Principles of the Law of Torts

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W. Clowes, 1885 - 416 sider
 

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Side 110 - We think that the true rule of law is, that the person who for his own purposes brings on his lands and collects and keeps there, anything likely to do mischief if it escapes, must keep it in at his peril, and, if he does not do so is prima facie answerable for all the damage which is the natural consequence of its escape.
Side 64 - With respect to the question whether a principal is answerable for the act of his agent in the course of his master's business, and for his master's benefit, no sensible distinction can be drawn between the case of fraud and the case of any other wrong.
Side 266 - That no action shall be brought whereby to charge any person upon or by reason of any representation or assurance made or given concerning or relating to the character, conduct, credit, ability, trade, or dealings of any other person, to the intent or purpose that such other person may obtain credit, money, or goods upon, unless such representation or assurance be made in writing, signed by the party to be charged therewith.
Side 272 - Malice in common acceptation means ill-will against a person, but in its legal sense it means a wrongful act, done intentionally, without just cause or excuse. If I give a perfect stranger a blow likely to produce death, I do it of malice, because I do it intentionally and without just cause or excuse.
Side 367 - But if the persuasion be used for the indirect purpose of injuring the plaintiff, or of benefiting the defendant at the expense of the plaintiff, it is a malicious act which is in law and in fact a wrong act, and therefore a wrongful act, and therefore an actionable act if injury ensues from it.
Side 163 - IT were infinite for the law to judge the causes of causes, and their impulsions one of another : therefore it contenteth itself with the immediate cause ; and judgeth of acts by that, without looking to any further degree.
Side 326 - In such cases the occasion prevents the inference of malice, which the law draws from unauthorized communications, and affords a qualified defence depending upon the absence of actual malice. If fairly warranted by any reasonable occasion or exigency, and honestly made, such communications are protected for the common convenience and welfare of society ; and the law has not restricted the right to make them within any narrow limits.
Side 20 - Whenever the death of a person shall be caused by wrongful act, neglect, or default, and the act, neglect, or default is such as would, if death had not ensued, have entitled the party injured to maintain an action and recover damages in respect thereof...
Side 261 - I apprehend it to be the rule of law that, if persons take upon themselves to make assertions, as to which they are ignorant whether they are true or untrue, they must, in a civil point of view, be held as responsible as if they had asserted that which they knew to be untrue.
Side 171 - LC are satisfied, the action does not the less lie because the natural 2 4 ^ '* and probable consequence of the act complained of is an act done by a third person : or because such act so done by a third person is a breach of duty or contract by him, or an act illegal on his part, or an act otherwise imposing an actionable liability on him.

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