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AN

ELEMENTARY TREATISE.

ON

G E O M E TRY,

SIMPLIFIED FOR

BEGINNERS NOT VERSED IN ALGEBRA.

PART I,

CONTAINING

PLANE GEOMETRY,

WITH ITS APPLICATION TO THE SOLUTION OF PROBLEMS.

BY FRANCIS J. GRUND.

New Edition, stereotyped.

BOSTON:
CARTER, HENDEE & co.

1834.

Educ T 148.34.436

HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY

GIFT OF THE
CONGREGATIONAL LIBRARY OF BOSTON

DEC 11 1935

DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS, TO WIT:

District Clerk's Office. Be it remembered, that on the fourth day of December, A. D. 1830, in the fiftyfifth year of the Independence of the United States of America, Francis GRUND, of the said district, has deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as author, in the words following, to wit:

AN ELEMENTARY TREATISE ON GEOMETRY, simplified for Beginners not versed in Algebra. Part I, containing Plane Geometry, with its Application to the Solution of Problems. By Francis J. Grund. Second Edition.

In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, “ An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned';" and also to an act, entitled, “ An act supplementary to an act, entitled, . Ản act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the

copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned ;' and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints."

JNO. W. DAVIS,
Clerk of the District of Massachusetts.

RECOMMENDATIONS.

From John Farrar, Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy

at Harvard University. Mr. Grund's Elementary Treatise on Geometry contains much useful matter, not generally to be found in English works of this description. There is considerable novelty, also, in the style and arrangement. The subject appears to be developed in a manner well suited to the younger class of learners, and to such an extent, and with such illustrations, as renders it a valuable introduction to the more extended works on Ge. ometry.

JOHN FARRAR. FEBRUARY 18th, 1830.

From G. B. Emerson, Principal of the English Classical School,

Boston. Mr. Grund's Geometry unites, in an unusual degree, strictness of demonstration with clearness and simplicity. It is thus very well suited to form habits of exact reasoning in young beginners, and to give them favorable impressions of the science. I have adopted it as a text book in my own school.

GEO. B. EMERSON. FEBRUARY 18th, 1830.

From E. Bailey, Principal of the Young Ladies' High School, Boston.

DEAR SIR-From the specimens of your work on Geometry which I have seen, and especially from the sheets I have used in my school since it went to the press, I have formed a high opinion of its merits. The general plan of the work appears to be very judicious, and you have executed it with great ability. Simplicity has been carefully studied, yet not at the expense of rigid demonstration. In this respect, it seems admirably fitted for the use of common schools. Believing your work cal

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