Philadelphia Medical and Physical Journal, Volum 1

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J. Conrad & Company, 1804
 

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Side 194 - IDE, of the said District, hath deposited in this office, the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit : " Inductive Grammar, designed for beginners. By an Instructer." In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States...
Side 187 - ... a custom loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose, harmful to the brain, dangerous to the lungs, and in the black stinking fumes thereof nearest resembling the horrible Stygian smoke of the pit that is bottomless.
Side 36 - British man of war, in the harbour of Portsmouth, were seated round the fire, one of them began to play a plaintive air on the violin. He had scarcely performed ten minutes, when a mouse apparently frantic, made its appearance in the centre of the floor. The strange gestures of the little animal, strongly excited the attention of the officers, who with one consent resolved to suffer it to continue its singular actions unmolested. Its exertions now appeared to be greater every moment — it shook...
Side 200 - In passing through the large prairies they were much distressed for water and provisions, for they saw neither beast nor bird; and though there was an abundance of salt springs, fresh water was very scarce. In one of these prairies, the salt springs ran into small ponds, in which, as the weather was hot, the water had sunk, and left the edges of the ponds so covered with salt, that they fully supplied themselves with that article, and might easily have collected bushels of it. As they were travelling...
Side 120 - ... animal creation. He was never known to have been at enmity with any man. During the whole course of his life, there was not a single instance of his engaging in a litigious contest with any of his neighbours, or others. He zealously testified against slavery; and, that his philanthropic precepts, on this subject, might have their due weight and force, he gave liberty to a most valuable male slave, then in the prime of his life, who had been bred up in the family almost from his infancy. He was,...
Side 121 - ... naturally industrious and active, both in body and mind; observing, that he never could find more time than he could employ to satisfaction and advantage, either in improving conversation, or in some healthy and useful bodily exercise: and he was astonished to hear men complaining, that they were weary of their time, and knew not what they should do. He was born and educated in the sect called Quakers. But his religious creed may, perhaps, be best collected from a pious distich, engraven by his...
Side 57 - It is to be observed, that the Spring before this Sickness, there was a numerous company of Flies, which were like for bigness unto Wasps...
Side 120 - His common drink was pure water, small-beer, or cyder mixed with milk. Nevertheless, he always kept a good and plentiful table. Once a year, commonly on new year's day, he made a liberal entertainment for his relations, and particular friends. His stature was rather above the middle size, and upright. His visage was long, and his countenance expressive of a degree of dignity, with a happy mixture of animation and sensibility. He was naturally industrious and active, both in body and mind; observing,...
Side 200 - Jessamine-county, a gentleman with whom I have been long acquainted, and who is well known to be a man of veracity, communicated a relation to me, which, at all events, appears to merit serious attention. After he had related it in conversation, I requested him to repeat it, and committed it to writing. It has certainly some internal marks of authenticity. The country which is described was altogether unknown, in Virginia, when the relation was given, and was probably very little known to the Shahnees-Indians.

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