The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England, Volum 3

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Side 215 - I hold every man a debtor to his profession; from the which, as men of course do seek to receive countenance and profit, so ought they of duty to endeavor themselves, by way of amends, to be a help and ornament thereunto.
Side 364 - It is the glory of God to conceal a thing : but the honour of kings is to search out a matter.
Side 342 - ... for it would thence follow that one infinity is greater than another, and that infinity is wasting away and tending to become finite. The like subtlety arises touching the infinite divisibility of lines, from the same inability of thought to stop.
Side 20 - I have been no avaricious oppressor of the people. I have been no haughty, or intolerable, or hateful man, in my conversation or carriage : I have inherited no hatred from my father, but am a good patriot born. Whence should this be; for these are the things that use to raise dislikes abroad.
Side 50 - I have been like a piece of stuff bespoken in the shop ; and if her Majesty will not take me, it may be the selling by parcels will be more gainful. For to be, as I told you, like a child following a bird, which when he is nearest flieth away and lighteth a little before, and then the child after it again, and so in infinitum, I am weary of it...
Side 339 - MAN, as the minister and Interpreter of Nature, does and understands as much as his observations on the Order of Nature, either with regard to things or the mind, permit him, and neither knows nor is capable of more.
Side 232 - ALL crimes have their conception in a corrupt intent, and have their consummation and issuing in some particular fact ; which though it be not the fact at which the intention of the malefactor levelled, yet the law giveth him no advantage of that error if another particular ensue of as high a nature.
Side 226 - THE benignity of the law is such as, when to preserve the principles and grounds of law it depriveth a man of his remedy without his own fault, it will rather put him in a better degree and condition than in a worse : for if it disable him to pursue his action, or to make his claim, sometimes it will give him the thing itself by operation of law without any act of his own; sometimes it will give him a more beneficial remedy.
Side 198 - And that she did acknowledge you had a great wit, and an excellent gift of speech, and much other good learning. But in law she rather thought you Could make show to the uttermost of your knowledge, than that you were deep.
Side 37 - He affecteth popularity by gracing such as he hath heard to be popular, and not by any fashions of his own : he is thought somewhat general in his favours ; and his virtue of access is rather, because he is much abroad, and in press, than that he giveth easy audience. He hasteneth to a mixture of both kingdoms and occasions, faster perhaps than policy will well bear.

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