English Premiers from Sir Robert Walpole to Sir Robert Peel, Volum 2

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Chapman and Hall, 1871

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Side 296 - But it may be that I shall leave a name sometimes remembered with expressions of goodwill in the abodes of those whose lot it is to labour and to earn their daily bread by the sweat of their brow, when they shall recruit their exhausted strength with abundant and untaxed food, the sweeter because it is no longer leavened by a sense of injustice.
Side 246 - I to be champion of the Decalogue, and to be eternally raising fleets and armies to make all men good and happy? We have just done saving Europe, and I am afraid the consequence will be, that we shall cut each other's throats.
Side 186 - The statesman-warrior, moderate, resolute, Whole in himself, a common good. Mourn for the man of amplest influence, Yet clearest of ambitious crime, Our greatest, yet with least pretence, Great in council and great in war, Foremost captain of his time, Rich in saving common sense, And, as the greatest only are, In his simplicity sublime.
Side 246 - For God's sake, do not drag me into another war! I am worn down and worn out with crusading and defending Europe and protecting mankind; I must think a little of myself. I am sorry for the Spaniards - I am sorry for the Greeks I deplore the fate of the Jews; the people of the Sandwich Islands are groaning under the most detestable tyranny; Baghdad is oppressed - I do not like the present state of the Delta - Tibet is not comfortable.
Side 277 - The Queen, having considered the proposal made to her yesterday by Sir Robert Peel, to remove the Ladies of her Bedchamber, cannot consent to adopt a course which she conceives to be contrary to usage, and which is repugnant to her feelings.
Side 174 - In matters of commerce, the fault of the Dutch Is giving too little and asking too much; With equal advantage the French are content: So we'll clap on Dutch bottoms a twenty per cent.
Side xii - But it is singular to remark how ready some people are to admire in a great man, the exception rather than the rule of his conduct. Such perverse worship is like the idolatry of barbarous nations, who can see the noon-day splendour of the sun without emotion, but who, when he is in eclipse, come forward with hymns and cymbals to adore him.
Side 65 - Her home is on the deep. With thunders from her native oak, She quells the floods below, As they roar on the shore When the stormy winds do blow ; When the battle rages loud and long, And the stormy winds do blow.
Side 62 - Really," said Pitt, with a sly severity, and it was almost the only sharp thing I ever heard him say of any friend, " I had not the curiosity to ask what I was to be.
Side 214 - For ever silent; even if they broke In thunder, silent; yet remember all He spoke among you, and the Man who spoke; Who never sold the truth to serve the hour, Nor palter'd with Eternal God for power; Who let the turbid streams of rumour flow Thro...

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