Cato. Dialogue on medals. Essay on Virgil's Georgies. Poemata. Poems on several occasions. Rosamond; an opera. Story of Salmacis and Hermaphroditus

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T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1811

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Side xxi - Or dost thou warn poor mortals left behind, A task well suited to thy gentle mind ? Oh! if sometimes thy spotless form descend, To me, thy aid, thou guardian genius, lend! When rage misguides me, or when fear alarms, When pain distresses, or when pleasure charms, In silent whisperings purer thoughts impart, And turn from ill a frail and feeble heart, Lead through the paths thy virtue trod before, Till bliss shall join, nor death can part us more.
Side 43 - Profuse of bliss, and pregnant with delight! Eternal pleasures in thy presence reign, And smiling plenty leads thy wanton train; Eas'd of her load, subjection grows more light, And poverty looks cheerful in thy sight: Thou mak'st the gloomy face of nature gay, Giv'st beauty to the sun, and pleasure to the day.
Side 221 - Tis not in mortals to command success, But well do more, Sempronius; we'll deserve it.
Side 45 - I bridle in my struggling Muse with pain, That longs to launch into a nobler strain.
Side 183 - For, wit lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those together with quickness and variety wherein can be found any resemblance or congruity, thereby to make up pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy...
Side xix - Can I forget the dismal night that gave My soul's best part for ever to the grave? How silent did his old companions tread, By midnight lamps, the mansions of the dead, Through breathing statues, then unheeded things, Through rows of warriors, and through walks of kings!
Side 287 - It must be so — Plato, thou reasonest well — Else whence this pleasing hope, this fond desire, This longing after immortality ? Or whence this secret dread, and inward horror, Of falling into naught ? Why shrinks the soul Back on herself, and startles at destruction ? 'Tis the divinity that stirs within us; 'Tis Heaven itself that points out an hereafter, And intimates eternity to man.
Side 367 - The man resolved and steady to his trust, Inflexible to ill, and obstinately just, May the rude rabble's insolence despise, Their senseless clamours and tumultuous cries , The tyrant's fierceness he beguiles, And the stern brow, and the harsh voice defies, And with superior greatness smiles.
Side 304 - Th' assembled deities survey'd. Great Pan, who wont to chase the fair, And lov'd the spreading oak, was there ; Old Saturn too, with upcast eyes, Beheld his abdicated skies ; And mighty Mars, for war renown'd, In adamantine armour frown'd ; By him the childless goddess rose, Minerva, studious to compose Her twisted threads ; the web she strung. And o'er a loom of marble hung : Thetis, the troubled ocean's queen Match'd with a mortal, next was seen, Reclining on a funeral urn, Her short-liv'd darling...
Side 289 - And, in the anguish of my heart beseech you To quit the dreadful purpose of your soul ! CATO. Thou hast been ever good and dutiful. [Embracing him.

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