Principles of Political Economy, with some of their applications to Social Philosophy, Volum 2

Forside
John W. Parker, 1849
 

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Utvalgte sider

Innhold

I
3
II
11
III
23
IV
32
V
34
VI
48
VII
70
VIII
89
XXII
231
XXIII
243
XXIV
250
XXV
262
XXVI
280
XXVII
299
XXVIII
306
XXIX
313

IX
98
XI
104
XII
110
XIII
121
XIV
141
XVI
147
XVII
156
XVIII
168
XIX
178
XX
190
XXI
219
XXX
337
XXXI
346
XXXII
368
XXXIII
384
XXXIV
409
XXXVI
418
XXXVII
429
XXXVIII
439
XL
447
XLI
473
XLII
497

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 484 - The only case in which, on mere principles of political economy, protecting duties can be defensible, is when they are imposed temporarily (especially in a young and rising nation) in hopes of naturalizing a foreign industry, in itself perfectly suitable to the circumstances of the country.
Side 349 - Fourthly, by subjecting the people to the frequent visits and the odious examination of the tax-gatherers, it may expose them to much unnecessary trouble, vexation, and oppression...
Side 121 - It is hardly possible to overrate the value, in the present low state of human improvement, of placing human beings in contact with persons dissimilar to themselves, and with modes of thought and action unlike those with which they are familiar.
Side 506 - Experience, however, proves that the depositaries of power who are mere delegates of the people, that is of a majority, are quite as ready (when they think they can count on popular support) as any organs of oligarchy, to assume arbitrary power, and encroach unduly on the liberty of private life.
Side 349 - The certainty of what each individual ought to pay is, in taxation, a matter of so great importance, that a very considerable degree of inequality, it appears, I believe, from the experience of all nations, is not near so great an evil as a very small degree of uncertainty.
Side 512 - Letting alone, in short, should be the general practice: every departure from it, unless required by some great good, is a certain evil.
Side 122 - ... it may be said without exaggeration that the great extent and rapid increase of international trade, in being the principal guarantee of the peace of the world, is the great permanent security for the uninterrupted progress of the ideas, the institutions, and the character of the human race.
Side 348 - The subjects of every state ought to contribute towards the support of the government, as nearly as possible, in proportion to their respective abilities; that is, in proportion to the revenue which they respectively enjoy under the protection of the state.
Side 348 - The tax which each individual is bound to pay ought to be certain and not arbitrary. The time of payment, the manner of payment, the quantity to be paid, ought all to be clear and plain to the contributor and to every other person.
Side 247 - ... the unlimited, growth of man's power over nature. Our knowledge of the properties and laws of physical objects shows no sign of approaching its ultimate boundaries: it is advancing more rapidly, and in a greater number of directions at once, than in any previous age or generation, and affording such frequent glimpses of unexplored fields beyond, as to justify the belief that our acquaintance with nature is still almost in its infancy.

Bibliografisk informasjon