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THE SERVICES AND PROGRESS OF PROMOTION OF THE
GENERALS, LIEUTENANT-GENERALS, MAJOR-
GENERALS, COLONELS, LIEUTENANT-
COLONELS, AND MAJORS OF THE
ARMY, ACCORDING TO

SENIORITY:

WITH

DETAILS OF THE PRINCIPAL MILITARY EVENTS OF

THE LAST CENTURY.

THIRD EDITION.

IN FIVE VOLUMES.

VOL. III.

LONDON:

Printed by A. J. Valpy, Red Lion Court, Fleet Street.
SOLD BY T. EGERTON, WHITEHALL; SHERWOOD,
NEELY, AND JONES, PATERNOSTER ROW;

AND ALL OTHER BOOKSELLERS.

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Subscribers' Copies (price 21. 10s. boards) are to be had only on application to Mr: Valpy, Red Lion Court, Fleet Street, or by letter addressed to the Editor, Military Library, Whitehall.

It is requested that all letters may be sent free of postage.

lull. Sowder sadha 3-21-32

Lieutenant-Generals.

283. LIEUTENANT-GENERAL JOHN HOPE.

In November, 1778, this officer was appointed a Cadet in General Houston's regiment of the Scots Brigade, then serving in Holland, and after being drilled, &c. went through the subordinate ranks of Corporal and Serjeant; and in December, 1779, received an Ensigncy in the same regiment, then quartered in Bergen-op-Zoom : he niarched with it to Maestrecht, where he continued till August, 1781, and then returned home. The 26th of April, 1782, he obtained a company, and again joined his regiment at Maestrecht. Having quitted the Dutch service, he was, with other officers in similar situations, placed by the King on half-pay. The 29th of September, 1787, he obtained a company in the 60th ; and in December of that year was again placed on half-pay. In June, 1788, he was appointed to a troop in the 13th Light Dragoons; and in November, 1792, Aid-deCamp to Lieutenant-General Sir William Erskine, with whom he went to Flanders early in 179.3. He served the campaign of that and the following year, and was present at all the actions in which the cavalry were engaged. He accompanied Sir William to England in 1795, and who died in March of that year. - The 25th of March he was promoted to a Majority in the 28th Light Dragoons; and the 20th of February, 1796, to a LieutenantColonelcy. In April following he embarked with his regiment for the Cape, and remained there till the regiment was drafted; in January, 1799, he arrived in England. The 19th of April he was appointed to the 37th foot; and in February, 1800, sailed to join the regiment at St. Vincent's. He remained in the West Indies till November, 1804, when he returned home and R. M. Cul III.

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exchanged into the 60th ; his commission in the latter corps was dated the Soth of June, 1804. The 1st of January, 1805, he received the rank of Colonel, and was placed on the Staff as Assistant Adjutant-General in North Britain; at the close of 1805 he was appointed Deputy Adjutant-General to the expedition destined for the Baltic, under Lieutenant-General Lord Cathcart ; but the troops being recalled, this officer did not proceed on that expedition, but returned to his Staff at Edinburgh. In May, 1807, he was again appointed Deputy Adjutant-General to the Forces going up the Baltic under the same officer, and did duty as such. He was present at the siege and capture of Copenhagen. In April, 1808, he was appointed Brigadier-General on the Staff in North Britain, and subsequently Deputy Adjutant-General to the Forces in that country; the 25th of July, 1810, Major-General, and placed on the Staff of the Severn District, from whence, in 1812, he was removed to that of the army under Lord Wellington in the Peninsula, where he was present at the battle of Salamanca, for which he has the lionor of wearing a medal.

He was subsequently placed on the Staff of Ireland and of North Britain, where he continued till his appointment to the rank of Lieutenant-General, the 12th of August, 1819.

284. LIEUTENANT-GENERAL GEORGE MEYRICK. This officer had the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in the army the 19th of March, 1796; of Colonel in the army the 1st of January, 1805; of Major-General the 25th of July, 1810; and of Lieutenant-General the 12th of August, 1819. He has been on half-pay many years.

LIEUTENANT-GENERAL SIR ALAN CAMERON,

K.C.B. This officer raised, and was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel Commandant of, the 79th foot, the 30th of January, 1794; Lieutenant-Colonel the 3rd of May, 1796; Colonel in the army, and of the 79th foot (which he raised) the 1st of January, 1805 ; Major-General the 25th of July, 1810; and LieutenantGeneral the 12th of August, 1819.

In 1809 he was appointed to the Staff of the army in the Peninsula, and which he quitted in 1810, on leave of absence. He was present at the battle of Talavera, as a BrigadierGeneral, and has the honor of wearing a medal for that service. His services have been rewarded by the distinction of Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath.

286. LIEUTENANT-GENERAL ANDREW, LORD BLAYNEY.

LORD BLAYNEY entered the service as Ensign in the 32d regiment on the 25th of November, 1789, and proceeded to join his regiment, then stationed at Gibraltar. He performed the various duties of a Subaltern in that garrison, and had the opportunity of forming his principles and future conduct from the regiment being at that period remarkable for its excellent order, and most perfect state of exemplary good discipline. Lord Blayney soon after embarked for the West Indies, from which place he exchanged into the 41st regiment as Lieutenant, then under the command of Sir Charles Gordon, from which regiment he obtained his company in the 38th by purchase, his Lordship being particularly anxious to obtain rank in that corps,

on account of his Father having died Colonel of it. In 1794 he obtained the Majority of the 89th regiment, by raising recruits for that rank, and joined the regiment in Flanders; or rather embarked on the expedition to Ostend, under the Earl of Moira, now the Marquess of Hastings. The rapid marches, the various privations and difficulties to which that small body were exposed, have been already stated in this work. His Lordship was frequently during that period engaged ; and the grand object was at length most miraculously effected, by forming a junction with the army under the command of His Royal Highness the Duke of York.

His Lordship served the entire of these campaigns; was frequently, in the course of them engaged either in the command of his own regiment, or commanding a detachment: most particularly one, shortly after his joining the army, with some Hessian and other troops, when it fell to his lot to command as Field Officer, and was sharply engaged. In the course of these campaigns it is worthy to remark upon the conduct of the

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