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called fort Detroit, with all the troops, regulars and militia, then and there under his command, and all the public stores, arms, and every thing else of a public nature, appertaining to said fort and army: and in prosecution of his said traitorous intentions, did then and there traitorously omit and neglect to repair and strengthen the works of said fort, and put the same in a proper condition for resistance and defence against the approaches and attacks of said enemy; and did traitorously neglect and omit to fortify the places and passes at and near said fort, by and through which the enemy might reasonably have been expected to approach, and did approach said fort ; and did traitorously omit and neglect to resist, repel and defeat the enemy in their approaches to and towards said fort, for the purpose of attacking and reducing the same ; and in further prosecution of said traitorous intentions, did treacherously surrender the said fort, with all the troop, reg. ulars and militia, under his command ; and all the public stores, arms and documents, including every thing else of a public nature, appertaining to said fort and army, unto the said enemy of the United States, under the command of Major Gen. Brock : whereby the said Brig. Gen. Hull, on the 16th of Aug. aforesaid, at Detroit aforesaid, did traitorously surrender the said fort to the said enemy, and adhere to said enemy, giving them aid and comfort.

Charge 2..... Cowardice at and in the neighborhood of Detroit, between the first day of July and the seventeenth day of Aug. in the year 1812.

Substance of the specifications to this charge.

First specification. In this..... That the said Brig. Gen. Wm. Hull, having command of the north-western army of the United States, and having therewith entered the British province of Upper Canada, with the avowed object of attacking and reducing the British fort called Malden, at Sandwich, in said prov. ince, on the 8th Aug. 1812, did misbehave himself before the enemy, and manifest undue fear and apprehension of danger, by conduct and conversation evincing personal alarm, agitation of mind, and privation of judgment, by abandonig said object and intention, by quitting the position by him taken at said Sand. wich, and by retreating abruptly out of said province to Detroit, in the territory of Michigan, without any cause for so doing, arising from the number, state, or condition of the enemy opposed to him: whereby the officers and soldiers of the army of the United States, under his command as aforesaid, lost all confidence in his personal courage and military capacity ; the inhabitants of said province were taught to distrust his power and professions; a shade was cast upon the American arms, and the cause of the l'nited States suffered great detriment and disadvantage.

Second specification. Also in this.... That afterwards, to wit, on the 15th Aug. 1812, at Detroit aforesaid, the enemy having raised certain batteries on the bank of the river opposite the United States' fort Detroit, and baving commenced a cannonade against said fort, the said Brig. Gen. Hull then and there baving command of the north-western army of the United States, and the said fort, during the continuance of said cannonade did shameful. ty misbehave himself before the enemy, and manifest great fear of personal danger, by a course of conduct evincing personal alarm, agitation of mind, and privation of judgment, by timid and cowardly expressions and actions, then and there uttered and used in the presence of the officers and soldiers of said army : whereby a fatal encouragement was afforded the hostile enterprizes of the enemy, a pernicious example given the American troop, and the service of the United States exposed to hazard, shame and dise appointment.

Third specification. Also in this.... That afterwards, to wit, on the 16th Aug. 1812, at Detroit, in the territory of Michigan, the said Brig. Gen. Wm. Hull, having command of the United States' fort Detroit, and the northwestern army of the United States, (the British forces having crossed the river, and landed at Springwells, and marched towards the said fort Detroit, with design to attack the same) did, during the crossing of the river, the landing and march by the enemy as aforesaid, shamefully misbehave himself before the enemy, and manifest great fear and apprehension of personal danger, by various timid and cowardly actions and expressions, then and there used and uttered in the presence of the officers and soldiers of said army, by avoiding all personal danger, making no attempt to prevent the crossing and landing of the enemy as aforesaid, avoiding all personal danger in reconnoitering or encountering the enemy in battle, in their approaches to said fort ; hastily sending flags of truce to them with overtures for capitulation; withdrawing his person from the American troop in the open field to the said fort Detroit ; giving irresolute and fluctuating orders ; forbidding the American artillery to fire on the enemy; calling the American troop from the open field, and crowding them into said fort; precipitately declaring to the enemy that he surrendered said fort and army, before terms of capitulation were considered or suggested ; and generally by a course of conduct and conversation evincing personal fear, agitation of mind, and privation of judgment : whereby the said fort and army were rendered then and there an easy and certain conquest to the enemy; the officers and soldiers of a gallant army exposed to unmerited mortification and reproach, and the service of the United States suffered great detriment and discredit.

Fourth specification. And also in this.... That the said Brig. Gen. Wm. Hull, on the 18th Aug. aforesaid, at Detroit aforesaid, having command of the United States' fort Detroit, well garrisoned, and supplied with cannon, ammunition and provisions, and the northwestern army of the United States, then and there being in fine spirits, and eager to meet the approaching enemy in battle, act. ing from personal fear and apprehension, and contemplating a shameful abandonment and surrender of said fort and army, did shamefully misbehave himself before the enemy, and enter into a shameful capitulation, containing no consolatory stipulations for the security of such of the inhabitants of Canada as had joined the American standard, nor any reasonable stipulation for an opportunity of reporting to his government the circumstances of so unex. pected and important an event: and did shamefully abandon, surrender and give up said fort and army, and all the public stores, arms and documents, including every thing else of a public nature belonging to said fort and army, to the approaching enemy under the command of Maj. Gen. Brock, without any cause therefor, arising from the superior number, state, and condition of the said enemy, or from the actual want, or just expectation of sudden want of arms, ammunition, or provisions for said fort and army, and without any other adequate cause whatever: whereby the territorial sovereignty, rights, and property of the United States were shamefully ceded to the enemy; a brave army wantonly sacrificed by the personal fears of its commander, and the service of the United States suffering a great and afflicting loss.

Charge 3.....Neglect of duty, and unofficer-like conduct while commanding a separate army between the ninth of April and the seventeenth Aug. in the year 1812.

Substance of the specifications to this charge.

First specification, in this..... That the said Brig. Gen. Wm. Hull, having command of the north-western army of the United States, from the 25th May, to the 16th Aug. 1812, unmindful of the trust reposed in him during all the time aforesaid, as well on the march of the said army from Dayton to Detroit, and at Detroit, as in the province of Upper Canada, was guilty of neglect of duty, and unofficer-like conduct, in neglecting to inspect, train, ex. ercise, review, and order said army, with sufficient care and frequency, or to cause the same to be done ; and also by neglecting in due time and form, to prepare and make known to said army an order of battle on its march from Dayton to Detroit atoresaid : whereby the discipline of said army was in danger of being relaxed ; its comfort liable to be impaired; its confidence in the military skill and dispositions of its commander diminished, and the said army exposed to the hazard of disorder and defeat, in the event of an attack thereon by the enemy.

Second specification. Also in this.... That the said Brig. Gen. Wm. Hull, having command of the north-western army of the United

States, and having cause to know or believe that war existed between the United States and Great Britain, on the 1st July, 1812, at the rapids of the river Miami of the lake, was guilty of neglect of duty and unofficer-like conduct, by hiring or causing to be hired, an unarmed vessel, and putting on board thereof, to be transported to Detroit, (having cause to know or believe the iminent danger of its capture by the enemy) certain sick soldiers, a great part of the hospital stores of said army, and a trunk containing the official correspondence of the secretary of war, touching the expedition on which said army was employed, and touching a declaration of war by the United States against Great Britain ; and also the official muster-rolls, reports, and returns of the number, state, and condition of said army: and the said vessel afterwards, on the 2d July aforesaid, on its passage from said rapids to Detroit, was captured by the enemy, having on board there. of, at the said capture, the said soldiers, hospital stores, and said trunk, containing the said correspondence, muster-rolls, reports, and returns : whereby the said soldiers were made prisoners, the said stores lost, and the said correspondence, muster-rolls, reports and returns came to the possession, knowledge, and use of the enemy, to the great injury of the United States.

Third specification. Also in this.....That the said Brig. Gen. Wm. Hull, having command of the north western army of the United States, and the United States' fort Detroit, from the 7th of July to the 16th Aug. 1812, the said fort being greatly damaged and dilapidated, and the guns and gun carriages thereof damaged and out of repair, and well knowing their importance to the service of the United States, was guilty of neglect of duty in omitting, during all the time aforesaid, to repair and strengthen said fort, omitting to repair the said guns and gun carriages, and generally, by neglecting to put said fort in a proper state for resistance and defence : whereby the said fort was an easy conquest to the enemy. The said guns and gun carriages afterwards required for service, in the province of Upper Canada, were uofit for transportation and use, great time consumed in fitting them afterwards for service, and the operations of the war fatally suspended.

Fourth specification. Also in this..... That the said Brig. Gen. Wm. Hull, having command of the north-western army of the United States, and having avowed the intention with said army to invade the province of Upper Canada, to invest and reduce the fort of the enemy called Malden, and to maintain and enlarge his positions therein, and having on the 7th July, 1812, arrived at Detroit, and having on the 12th July aforesaid, invaded said prov. ince, and having on the 8th of Aug. following evacuated said province, well knowing that resolution and energy were necessary in the prosecution of his said intention, was guilty of negleet

of duty, and unofficer-like conduct, by not seasonably repairing, fitting, and tranpsporting the guns and gun carriages necessary in the prosecution of said intention, by an useless waste of time at Sandwich, in said province, without attempting the reduction of Malden, and in projects to conciliate the inhabitants of said province and neighbouring Indians, without resorting to the more effectual display of military power and capacity, to maintain his acquisitions, and perform his promises of protection, by postponing in the first instance, and abandoning in the next an attack of fort Malden, and finally, by evacuating said province without providing for the safety of such of the inhabitants thereof as had accepted his invitation to join the American standard, and without accomplishing in any degree his said avowed intention : wbereby the enemy were enabled to bring his power and conduct into suspicion and contempt, to reinforce fort Malden, and to prepare for the investment of the United States' fort Detroit : while on the other hand, the said United States' army was diminished in numbers by sickness and casualties ; the officers and soldiers dissatisfied and disgusted by a scene of inactivity, irresolution, and procrastination; the hope of support and co-operation from the inhabitants of said province and the Indians destroyed; and the general ardor of the army insensibly abated.

Fifth specification. Also in this..... That the said Brig. Gen. Wm. Hull, having command of the north-western army of the United States, arrived with said army at Detroit, on or about the 7th July, 1812; invaded the province of Upper Canada, on or about the 12th July aforesaid ; evacuated said province on or about the 8th Aug. following, and returned to Detroit, and abandoned and surrendered the said United States' fort Detroit, and said army, on the 16th Aug. aforesaid, to the enemy under the command of Maj. Gen. Brock, And that during all the movements aforesaid it was of high importance to the supply of said fort and army, that a free and open communication by and between the said fort and army and a certain United States' military post at the river Rasin should be preserved : and the said Hull, well knowing the premises, was guilty of neglect of duty and unofficer-like conduct, by suffering the enemy to interrupt said communication, viz. on or about the 1st Aug. 1812 ; also by detaching, on the 4th Aug. aforesaid, Maj. Thomas B. Van Horne to open or attempt to open said communication, with an inadequate force, having cause to know or believe the same inadequate : also by afterwards, on the 8th Aug. aforesaid, detaching Col. James Miller, with about 500 men, to open or attempt to open said conmunication, and neglecting to furnish and forward to said detachment an adequate supply of provisions, having cause to know or believe said detachment to be in want thereof, and unable to proceed without the same : and also by afterwards, on the 14th day of

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