The Psychological Principles of Education: A Study in the Science of Education

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Macmillan, 1906 - 435 sider
 

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Side 226 - On the other hand, sit all day in a moping posture, sigh, and reply to everything with a dismal voice, and your melancholy lingers. There is no more valuable precept in moral education than this, as all who have experience know if we wish to conquer undesirable emotional tendencies in ourselves, we must assiduously, and in the first instance coldbloodedly, go through the outward movements of those contrary dispositions which we prefer to cultivate. The reward of persistency will infallibly come,...
Side 225 - Refuse to express a passion, and it dies. Count ten before venting your anger, and its occasion seems ridiculous. Whistling to keep up courage is no mere figure of speech. On the other hand, sit all day in a moping posture, sigh, and reply to everything with a dismal voice, and your melancholy lingers. There is no more valuable precept in moral education than this, as all who have...
Side 243 - We would not have our guardians grow up amid images of moral deformity, as in some noxious pasture, and there browse and feed upon many a baneful herb and flower day by day, little by little, until they silently gather a festering mass of corruption in their own soul.
Side 303 - Therefore, since custom is the principal magistrate of man's life, let men by all means endeavour to obtain good customs. Certainly custom is most perfect when it beginneth in young years : this we call education, which is in effect but an early custom.
Side 243 - Let our artists rather be those who are gifted to discern the true nature of the beautiful and graceful : then will our youth dwell in a land of health, amid fair sights and sounds, and receive the good in everything; and beauty, the effluence of fair works, shall flow into the eye and ear, like a healthgiving breeze from a purer region, and insensibly draw the soul from earliest years into likeness and sympathy with the beauty of reason.
Side 298 - The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ, Moves on : nor all your Piety nor Wit Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line, „. x Nor all your Tears wash out a Word of it.
Side 253 - Beloved Pan, and all ye other gods who haunt this place, give me beauty in the inward soul; and may the outward and inward man be at one.
Side 105 - On which ground, too, let him who gropes painfully in darkness or uncertain light, and prays vehemently that the dawn may ripen into day, lay this other precept well to heart, which to me was of invaluable service: 'Do the Duty -which lies nearest thee,' which thou knowest to be a Duty ! Thy second Duty will already have become clearer.
Side 337 - But of Beauty, I repeat again that we saw her there shining in company with the celestial Forms ; and coming to earth we find her here too, shining in clearness through the clearest aperture of sense.
Side 358 - It makes a great difference to a man whether one set of his ideas, or another, be the centre of his energy; and it makes a great 149 difference, as regards any set of ideas which he may possess, whether they become central or remain peripheral in him. To say that a man is "converted...

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