Gas Review, Volum 7

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American Thresherman, 1914
 

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Side 74 - Dictionary, for example, defines a standard as, "any measure of extent, quantity, quality, or value established by law, or by general usage and consent." Social work standards aim to represent measures primarily of quality and value; but until they are more objectively defined, it will be difficult to get them established either by law or by general usage and consent.
Side 76 - ... there are no international controversies so serious that they cannot be settled peaceably if both parties really desire peaceable settlement, while there are few causes of dispute so trifling that they cannot be made the occasion of war if either party really desires war. The matters in dispute between nations are nothing; the spirit which deals with them is everything.
Side 40 - Ib. per square inch, and the effect is very marked, the explosion becoming almost inaudible. This effect of the presence of steam in the explosive charge is of course well known, but the quantity of steam formed in an engine cooled in this manner is so large that it constitutes a substantial advantage of the method. It will be noticed that the formation of the steam does not involve any thermodynamic loss, such as occurs when water is sprayed into the cylinder in an atomized condition and evaporated...
Side 38 - The jets are directed to all parts of the surface of the combustion-chamber and against the face of the piston. The projection of liquid water against the walls and the proper distribution of that water are the first essentials of effective cooling by water-injection; but there are other conditions which must be satisfied in order that the system may be a practical success. It is the experience of all who have had much to do with gas engines, that whenever liquid water has by accident or design been...
Side 78 - C. under atmospheric pressure. The agreement between the available heat and the amount of water evaporated is satisfactory, such difference as there is being accounted for partly by greater radiation loss consequent on the higher temperature of the engine, and partly by the reduction in flame temperature produced by the steam, which somewhat reduces the total amount of heat passing into the walls. The engine consumed in this trial 15 cubic feet of Cambridge coal gas per BHp-hour reckoned at atmospheric...
Side 22 - Rule. — Multiply the diameter of the driver by its number of revolutions, and divide the product by the number of revolutions of the driven; the quotient will be its diameter.
Side 78 - Ibs. of water at a temperature of 20° C. under atmospheric pressure. The agreement between the available heat and the amount of water evaporated is satisfactory, such difference as there is being accounted...
Side 36 - About 30 per cent. of the heating value of the fuel passes into the metal of the engine in this way, and it is necessary to provide means for its removal as fast as it goes in. In all engines hitherto made (except the small air-cooled engines) the removal of the heat has been effected by the circulation of water round the cylinder, and (in large engines) in the substance of the piston and exhaust-valve. External water-cooling is the ultimate cause of most of the disadvantages under which the gas...
Side 80 - ... changes in the quality of the gas. Safety Plug. It is one of the advantages of this method of cooling that failure of the water supply — such as may occasionally occur owing to the pump-valve sticking — entails nothing worse than a temporary shut-down. If the water-cooling of the piston in a large gas engine is stopped for a few minutes, the engine is very likely to be wrecked by the seizing of the expanding piston in the cold cylinder. But if the engine is cooled by injection, nothing of...
Side 78 - ... has been observed at the bends of the exhaust-pipe where the gases impinge on the metal, and corrosion in the exhaust-pipe is also liable to occur at any place where water can accumulate. This, however, is not serious or rapid, and such as it is can easily be avoided by arranging the pipe suitably. Except at these points, no corrosion has been observed anywhere, and the experience of this engine has completely proved that the necessary and sufficient condition for the prevention of corrosion...

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