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nate to Mr. Markham, that the pre

paring of his instructions (which were undoubtedly intended to be conclusive) took up so much time, as considerably to delay his return to the confined Rajah. It seemed indeed scarcely well to be expečted, that in the neighbourhood of a capital city, adjoining befides to a large town, and in a part of the world where the people are so exceedingly attached to their native princes, such a matter could have hung in suspence during the greater part of a day, while the multitude, ignorant of what was really passing, dreaded every moment to be that, which might prove fatal to their sovereign, without its producing some violent popular commotion. It appears then upon the whole, that the governor general had placed too great a confidence in the effect to be produced by his name, and in the respe&t or terror attached to his situation and character, in venturing up on so bold and extraordinary a measure, without having such a force inmediately upon the spot, as would be sufficient effectually to overawe the people, and if not entirely to prevent, to be at least able to check commotion in the very bud. Perhaps likewise he fell into that common European error, which neither reason nor experience have been able to eradicate, and built too much upon the supposed timidity of the people. The antient palace of Rammagur, lay on the opposite side of Vol. XXVI.

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held, or the reliance that was placed on their inoffensive charaćter, that these grenadiers were led by their officers, upon a service so fingular and alarming, without ammunition. Major Popham, upon some intelligence of this fatal error, and perhaps of the appearance we have mentioned, dispatched another company of sepoys, with ammunition, to supply and reinforce the first party; but these found the place alreadly so entirely blocked up by armed men, and all the avenues so choked by multitudes of people, that they found it impossible to make their way through such a crowd, determined as it was not to admit their passage. It seems probable that the appearance of this party, served greatly to increase the rage of the already inflamed multitude; who perhaps confidered them as conveying, or being the intended executors of, the final doom of their prince; for the attack of the grenadiers in the square, infiantly commenced on their arrival. These being destitute of their usual means of defence, were little capable of withstanding the weight and fury of the outrageous multitude, who burst in like a torrent on all sides upon them.

The unfortunate party were al

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the Rajah was nearly overwhelmed with terror, at the commencement of the tumult, expecting his life to be the immediate forfeit to the rashness of the people. He was, however, carried off by his attendants during the confufion, through a ... on the garden side, which led to the river; and the banks being there very steep, he was let down into 3 boat that conveyed him to the other side, by a number of turbans tied together. The tumultuous crowd who effected his rescue, and who seemed to be equally destitute of judgment and leaders, looked to nothing farther than his mere escape, and followed him across the river, in the same disorder that they had before passed. Lieutenant Birrel, who led that company of sepoys, which brought up the ammunition, as the crowd decreased, pushed on to the palace, where he had a smart scuffle, in which about 30 of his men were killed or wounded, in clearing it of a party of the rioters, who had loitered behind the main body. . Major Popham arrived soon after with the remainder of his detachment, which had been encamped at about two miles distance; but he had only the mortification of behclding the mangled bodies of his dead and wounded soldiers, without its being in his power to take any vengeance of the authors of the massacre. The Rajah, in his manifesto, as well as in several of his letters to the governor general, attributes the whole outrage and mischief that happened, to the unparalleled intolence of an inferior of ficer belonging to the resident; whe

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