Prolegomena Logica: An Inquiry Into the Psychological Character of Logical Processes

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W. Graham, 1851 - 320 sider
 

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Side 26 - I find, indeed, I have a faculty of imagining, or representing, to myself the ideas of those particular things I have perceived, and of variously compounding and dividing them.
Side 125 - The only thing whose existence we deny, is that which philosophers call Matter or corporeal substance. And in doing of this, there is no damage done to the rest of mankind, who, I dare say, will never miss it.
Side 36 - When the understanding is once stored with these simple ideas, it has the power to repeat, compare, and unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted wit or enlarged understanding, by any quickness or variety of thought, to invent or frame one new simple idea in the mind, not taken in by the ways before mentioned; nor can any force of the understanding destroy those that are there...
Side 72 - finite.' Therefore there is no idea or conception of any thing we call ' infinite.' No man can have in his mind an image of infinite magnitude, nor conceive infinite swiftness, infinite time, or infinite force, or infinite power. When we say...
Side 317 - Were it possible that a human creature could grow up to manhood in some solitary place, without any communication with his own species, he could no more think of his own character, of the propriety or demerit of his own sentiments and conduct, the beauty or deformity of his own mind, than of the beauty or deformity of his own face.
Side 61 - Proper names are not connotative: they denote the individuals who are called by them; but they do not indicate or imply any attributes as belonging to those individuals.
Side 125 - It will be urged that thus much at least is true, to wit, that we take away all corporeal substances. To this my answer is, that if the word substance...
Side 27 - I can consider the hand, the eye, the nose, each by itself abstracted or separated from the rest of the body. But then whatever hand or eye I imagine, it must have some particular shape and color.
Side 292 - If a straight line meet two straight lines, so as to make the two interior angles on the same side of it taken together less than two right angles...
Side 27 - It is, I know, a point much insisted on, that all knowledge and demonstration are about universal notions, to which I fully agree...

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