The History of the Reign of the Emperor Charles V: With a View of the Progress of Society in Europe, from the Subversion of the Roman Empire to the Beginning of the Sixteenth Century

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Harper, 1836 - 643 sider
 

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Side 456 - I had left you by my death this rich inheritance, to which I have made such large additions, some regard would have been justly due to my memory on that account ; but now, when I voluntarily resign to you what I might have still retained, I may well expect the warmest expressions of thanks on your part.
Side 482 - He resolved to celebrate his own obsequies before his death. ' He ordered his tomb to be erected in the chapel of the ' monastery. His domestics marched thither in funeral pro'cession, with black tapers in their hands. He himself followed ' in his shroud. He was laid in his coffin, with much solemnity. ' The service for the dead was chanted, and Charles joined 'in the prayers which were offered up for the rest of his soul, 1 mingling his tears with those which his attendants shed, as if 'they had...
Side 126 - ... and then from all thy sins, transgressions, and excesses, how enormous soever they may be, even from such as are reserved for the cognizance of the holy see; and as far as the...
Side 329 - ... which they held to be sacred, or valued as beneficial, imputed to him not only all the defects and vices of a man, but the qualities of a demon. The other, warmed with the admiration and gratitude, which they thought he merited as the restorer of light and liberty to the Christian church, ascribed to him perfections above the condition of humanity, and viewed all his actions with a veneration bordering on that, which should be paid only to those who are guided by the immediate inspiration of...
Side 464 - Some months before his resignation he had sent an architect thither to add a new apartment to the monastery, for his accommodation ; but he gave strict orders that the style of the building should be such as suited pis present station, rather than his former dignity. It consisted only of six rooms, four of them in the form of friars...
Side 330 - ... most culpable, gave no disgust to his contemporaries. It was even by some of those qualities, which we are now apt to blame, that he was fitted for accomplishing the great work which he undertook. To rouse * mankind, when sunk in ignorance or superstition, and to encounter the rage of bigotry armed with power, required the utmost vehemence of zeal, as well as a temper daring to excess. A gentle call would neither have reached, nor have excited those to whom it was addressed. A spirit more amiable,...
Side 330 - His mind, forcible and vehement in all its operations, roused by great objects, or agitated by violent passions, broke out, on many occasions, with an impetuosity which astonishes men of feebler spirits, or such as are placed in a more tranquil situation. By carrying some praiseworthy dispositions to excess, he bordered sometimes on what was culpable, and was often betrayed into 1546.
Side 132 - In consequence of this event, the vicariat of that part of Germany which is governed by the Saxon laws, devolved to the Elector of Saxony ; and under the shelter of his friendly administration, Luther...
Side 18 - Asia, while former adventurers returned home and imported many of the customs to which they had been familiarized by a long residence abroad. Accordingly, we discover, soon after the commencement of the Crusades, greater splendour in the courts of princes, greater pomp in public ceremonies, a more refined taste in...
Side 218 - Italians could commit, these the wretched inhabitants were obliged to suffer. Churches, palaces, and the houses of private persons were plundered without distinction. No age, or character, or sex, was exempt from injury. Cardinals, nobles, priests, matrons, virgins, were all the prey of soldiers, and at the mercy of men deaf to the voice of humanity. Nor did these outrages cease, as is usual in towns which are carried by assault, when the first fury of the storm was over; the Imperialists kept possession...

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