The political mirror, or, Review of Jacksonism

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J.P. Peaslee, 1835 - 316 sider
 

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Exhibited in his inaugural address
34
Mr Adams views particularly liable to misconstruction
35
ELECTION OF 1834
36
Principles on which he formed his cabinetand made appointment to office
37
Injurious effect of these principles upon his popularity
38
His policy exclusively American
39
Favourite objects of his policy
40
Inducements to the Panama Mission
41
Results anticipated by the administration from the convention 43 Views of previous administrations on the interests involved therein
43
Very important results of Mr Monroes declaration
44
Character of the Panama Convention
45
Deference of Mr Adams for the coordinate departments of the Gov ernment in preparing the Panama Mission 47 The Mission approved by Congress ...
46
Dangerous nature of the workings of party on the American Sys tem
51
Important that the system should be understood by the country
52
Power to lay taxes for other purposes than revenue long exercised
53
Interests involved in this question
54
The American System becomes apparently the settled policy of the countryIts scope
55
Active opposition excited against
56
Source of the power to enact a protective tariff
57
Principles on which it is opposed
58
Modified admission of the power
59
Congress may lay taxes for the regulation of commerce but not for the protection of manufactures
60
Various views as to the extent of the admitted power of taxation
61
Remarks on the opinion that the power of taxation is limited by the enumerated powers granted to Congress
62
The right to lay taxes for other purposes than revenue results from every construction of the taxing power
63
Of the expediency of exercising this power
64
Violent opposition proposed to
65
Of the right of the General Government to appropriate its funds
66
internal improvements 67 Consequences of a construction denying this right
67
Construction supporting renders the Constitution consistent
68
C Of the extent of this right 70 xli? powers to raise and appropriate monies for the public welfare are inseparable
70
Such dependence the effect of design
71
Views which support this construction
72
What is the limitation to the exercise of this power
73
The practice of the Government what
74
The power to make certain internal improvements depends on the enumerated powers
75
No substantive difference between the principles of the administra tion and its opponents
79
Who were the malcontents?
80
The question answered
81
Inducements of certain southern sections to oppose Mr Adams ad ministration His opponents unite in the cry of corruption SJ Removal of the publis...
84
General Andrew Jackson selected as a candidate for the Presidency
85
History of the pretence of retrenchment
86
Injustice to the administration of Mr AdamsSummary
87
BS Progress in the formation of n new party 89 A design to control the public press avowed by Mr Van Buren
89
Position of Mr Van Buren in 1827
91
Proofs of the combination
92
Components of the combination
93
Reciprocal concessions of the northern and southern partisans Mr Van Burens offering
94
Object of Mr Van Buiens visit to the South
95
Motive of the combination illustrated by the conduct of Mr Ran dolph
96
7 State of parties in the House
97
Claim of irresponsibility for General Jackson
98
Reasons for denying this
99
Exalted intellectual power ascribed to the General by an Enelish panegyrist
100
Supernatural intelligence attributed to him by an Americandepen
101
Eiaggeratnd praise begets inquiry
102
Birth and education of General Jackson
103
JS1 Sttl68 al Nashvillesuccess thereenters into public life J f ves incompetent to the civil offices to which he was appointed 1 His martial tastes 107 En...
107
He is engaged in the Creek
108
The Generals conduct in the campaign
109
The subject of great eulogium
110
Award of the historic muse
111
The General receives a commission in the regular army
112
First Florida campaign
113
Remarks on the campaign of New Orleans
114
Proclamation of martiaflaw
115
Claims of Mr Adams
116
Case of Mr Louaillier and others
117
The Generals conduct rebuked by the administration
118
Public opinion of Jacksons character
119
Causes of the Seminole war
120
How disposed
124
The Generals ignorance and disregard of the laws again exemplified
125
General Jackson Governor of Florida His tyrannical conduct
127
Proceedings against the Spanish exgovernor
128
Comment thereon
129
Nature of the ordinances of General Jackson in Florida
130
Effects of these ordinances upon the inhabitants
131
Disability of General Jackson for civil employment as deduced from his life
132
General Jackson elected to the Senate in 1824 resigns in 1825
134
How has the General become popular? 139 Admirably qualified as the agent of party CHAPTER VI
135
General Jackson chosen President State of the electoral vote
137
Causes of his election
138
Doubts of his political principles
139
Letter to Mr Monroe principles therein supported
140
The General becomes the slave of party
141
Violent emotions of party cupidity
142
Avowal of venality by the party presses
143
Corruption of the press
144
Proscription becomes the policy of the administration
145
Presidential policy as exposed in the inaugural speech
146
New source of power opened for the President
147
The nature of this power further exhibited
148
Further illustration
149
What abuseB required reform 151 Rapidity and extent of reform
151
New tenure of office
152
Abuse of the power of appointmentbribery change of the constitu tion plan of a great national party
153
Case of illustration from Boston 163 Case from Ohio
163
Case in the War Department
164
Case of proposed bargain between applicants
165
Case of reward for indecent violence
166
Reprobation of the Presidents course by an administration editor
167
Unconstitutional exercise of the appointing power
168
Theory of Mi Jefferson in his letter to Mr Gerry
169
Practice of Mr JeffersonCase of Col Allen McLane
170
Gross contrast between the practice and theory of the Jackson ad ministration
171
Counter proclamation of South Carolina
172
Division of political powers in free governments 173 How made in American Constitutions generally
173
Counter checks in the Constitution of the United States
174
Every department derives its powers from the Constitution
175
The Governments of the United States are limited Governments
176
Singular dread of legislati ve encroachment Slender provision against the Executive
177
Confidence of the first Congress in Presidential discretion
178
Analogy between the Executive power in England and America In road on the legislative power in the former
179
Federal Convention did not overlook the danger from Executive power
180
Provision against abuse of Treasury influence
181
Precautions against Executive power hitherto vain
182
but it is desira ble that the power to remove should not be so vested
183
Remedy for evils arising under the express provision and under the construction of the Constitution
184
Various opinions relative to the power to remove from office
185
Reasons for supposing it vested in the President alone
186
Reply to these reasons
187
18S Reasons for supposing the power in the President and Senate 189 Reasons against such supposition
189
Reasons for supposing the power subject to legislation
190
Arguments against
191
No experience upon this question when first decided in Congress
192
Appointing and removing power in Pennsylvania
193
Reasons for the decision of the question
194
Prophetic views of the opponents of the power
195
Limited views of the power by its friends
196
Extraordinary nature of the decision on this subject
197
The evils of this power to be remedied by the people
198
Settled state of the foreign policy of the United States
199
Unsettled condition of our domestic polity 201 Presidents message 1829 New propositions
201
Change of the constitutional mode of electing President
202
Rotation in office
203
Protection of domestic manufactures
204
Internal Improvement prostrated
205
Veto of the President on the Maysville road bill
206
Power acquired to the President thereby
207
Oblation to southern policy
208
Inconsistent use of the veto
209
Narrow rule of expediency adopted by the administration
212
Other causes assigned by the President for his veto
214
Results of the Presidents policy
215
Presidents power in legislation considered
216
Character of the veto
217
Views of the veto power in the Convention
218
Abuse of the veto power by President Jackson 220 True objects of the veto power
220
Exercise of this power by the several Presidents of the United States
221
Effect of the power when Congress is unbiassed by the President
222
Policy of the nation relative to Indian tribes
223
Prospects of the Cherokees and other southern Indians
224
Their relations with the State of Georgia
225
Relations with the United States Rights of the latter
226
227 General principles in relation to the intercourse between the Indiana and the whites
227
Concurrence of Georgia in these principles
228
Relations by compact between United Slates and Cherokees
229
United Stales to extinguish the Indian title in Georgia
230
Cherokees demonstrate a determination to retain their lands Geor gia seizes and divides them Cherokees appeal to the United States
231
The Jackson administration refuse to interfere
232
Treaties and laws relating to the Indians disregarded
233
The case admitted to be one of great difficulty
234
Measures of the administration in relation to
235
How viewed by the Indians
236
The Cherokees will not quit their homes
237
President prematurely broaches the recharter of the Bank of the United States
238
True cause of the untimely suggestion Government Bank proposed
239
Nature of a Government Bank
240
Would have boundless and baleful patronage
241
Views of this Bank by Committee of Ways and Means
242
Committee qualify their reproof in tenderness to the President
243
True light in which the report exhibits the President
244
Sense of the nation against the views of the administration 240 House of Representatives not yet overcome by executive influence 247 Its intractablc...
245
Mr Calhouns views in supporting General Jackson
248
Magical opposition to his wishes
249
Dependence of presidential aspirants upon General Jackson
250
Search after means to make a quarrel between the President and Vice President
251
Success of the search
252
Mr Calhoun made auxiliary to his own injury
253
Preparation of the explosion
254
The development of presidential hostility
255
The expose Proclamation of his innocence by Mr Van Buren
256
What should be the judgment upon the evidence?
257
True view of Mr Calhouns conduct in the Seminole business
258
Consequences of the quarrel
260
Management of public domain
266
Causes for this
271
Charge against the Bank for consulting its own interestsCase
279
President negatives the Land Bill
290
CHAPTER XVII
298
S77 Oppostion to the Tariff in the South
300
Character of the Maysville message by Mr Clay
310

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Populære avsnitt

Side 19 - With the movements in this hemisphere, we are of necessity more immediately connected, and by causes w^hich must be obvious to all enlightened and impartial observers. The political system of the Allied Powers is essentially different in this respect from that of America.
Side 118 - Both the constitutionality and the expediency of the law creating this bank are well questioned by a large portion of our fellow citizens; and it must be admitted by all that it has failed in the great end of establishing a uniform and sound currency.
Side 199 - I adjure you, as you honor their memory, as you love the cause of freedom, to which they dedicated their lives, as you prize the peace of your country, the lives of its best citizens, and your own fair fame, to retrace your steps. Snatch from the archives...
Side 210 - Army, shall be considered as a common fund for the use and benefit of such of the United States as have become, or shall become members of the confederation...
Side 304 - Resolved, That the President, in the late Executive proceedings in relation to the public revenue, has assumed upon himself authority and power not conferred by the Constitution and laws, but in derogation of both.
Side 77 - The duties of all public officers are, or, at least, admit of being made so plain and simple, that men of intelligence may readily qualify themselves for their performance; and I cannot but believe that more is lost by the long continuance of men in office than is generally to be gained by their experience.
Side 241 - The charter of the Bank of the United States expires in 1836, and its stockholders will most probably apply for a renewal of their privileges. In order to avoid the evils resulting from precipitancy in a measure involving such important principles, and such deep pecuniary interests, I feel that I cannot, in justice to the parties interested, too soon present it to the deliberate consideration of the Legislature and the People.
Side 20 - Governments and Spain we declared our neutrality at the time of their recognition, and to this we have adhered, and shall continue to adhere, provided no change shall occur which, in the judgement of the competent authorities of this Government, shall make a corresponding change on the part of the United States indispensable to their security.
Side 232 - Waiving the question of the constitutional authority of the Legislature to establish an incorporated bank as being precluded in my judgment by repeated recognitions under varied circumstances of the validity of such an institution in acts of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the Government, accompanied by indications, in different modes, of a concurrence of the general will of the nation...
Side 296 - State, that the Bank of the United States ought not to be rechartered.

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