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• 199

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Page
Mr. Forbes to Mr. Hardy, 25th May, 1793,-Committals, by the Lords,
of Butler and Bond, for Breach of Privilege

158
Mr. Grattan to Mr. Day, 16th July, 1794–French War

171
Lord Fitzwilliam to Mr. Grattan, August 23rd, 1794,-Lord Lieuten-
ancy of Ireland

173
Mr. Grattan to Mr. Berwick, 12th September, 1794,–His Arrival in
London

174
Mr. Pitt to Mr. Grattan, 15th October, 1794,-Requesting an Interview 175
Same to same, 15th October, 1794,-Confidential Communi-
cation.

176
Mr. Grattan to Mr. M'Can, 27th October, 1794,-Respecting the Nego-
tiations with Lord Fitzwilliam

178
Lord Fitzwilliam to Mr. Grattan, 30th October, 1794,-Accepts the
Lord Lieutenancy of Ireland

179
Mr. Forbes to Mr. Serjeant Adair, 25th February, 1795,— Respecting
Mr. Pitt and the Catholics

196
Lord Loughborough to Mr. Grattan, 28th February, 1795,- Respecting
Lord Fitzwilliam and the Beresfords

197
Edmund Burke to Mr. Grattan, 3rd March, 1795,-Lord Fitzwilliam-

Intrigues of the Beresfords, &c.
Same to same, 5th March, 1795,-Beresfords_Lord Clare-
Lord Fitzwilliam-the Catholics

202
Lord Fitzwilliam to Mr. Grattan, 25th April, 1795,-Lord Fitzwilliam's

Interview with the King on the subject of his Recall-His
Defence in the House of Lords

208
Lord Milton to Mr. Grattan, 26th April, 1795,-Debates in the Lords
on Lord Fitzwilliam's Recall

. 212
Mr. John Therry to Mr. Grattan, 6th January, 1797,-- Loyalty of the

Roman Catholics on the appearance of the French off Bantry 264
Lord Camden to the Duke of Portland, 10th January, 1797,-On the

Good Conduct and Loyalty of the Irish in 1796, when the

French appeared
Lord Moira to the Whig Club, 30th April, 1797,-On his Motion in
Parliament

276
Doctor Haliday to Lord Camden, 29th March, 1797,-On the State of
the North and General Lake's Proclamation

311
Charles James Fox to Mr. Grattan, 7th April, 1797,-On the State of
Ireland

314
The Bishop of Waterford to Mr. Grattan, 14th May, 1797,-On the
Secret Committee-Mr. Grattan's conduct

317
Mr. Grattan to the Bishop of Waterford, 17th May, 1797,-Reply to
the above on his conduct

317
Same.. to Mr. (afterwards Lord) Monck, May 1797–Retires from
Yeomanry

318
Same .. to Mr. M'Can, - 1797,--His health Convictions and
executions

319
Same to same, 27th Sept. 1797,-Of Peter Burrowes—Sheridan 321
Same .. to same, 3rd October, 1797,-Conduct of Government 322
Same to same, 11th October, 1797,- The Orangemen

322

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· 265

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INDEX TO LETTERS.

xiii

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Mr. Grattan to Rev. Mr. Berwick, 26th October, 1797,-Mr. Pitt-
Sheridan-Fitzgibbon

323
Sir Laurence Parsons to Lord Camden, March, 1798,-Resigns com-
mand of Militia

344
Lord Camden to Sir L. Parsons, 28th March, 1798,-Accepts the
Resignation

344
Mr. Thomas Addis Emmett to Mr. Peter Burrowes, 19th Nov. 1806,-
His feelings as to Ireland, and return thither

361
Mr. Grattan to Mr. M'Can, 27th June, 1798,-Dr. Duigenan's Pam-
phlet

383
Mrs. Grattan to same, 27th June, 1798,-Journey to North Wales 383
Mr. Grattan to Dr. Duigenan, 7th August, 1798,-In reply to his
attack

403
Same .. to the Rev. Mr. Berwick, 19th September, 1798,-Books
of Divinity-Landing of the French-Lord Cornwallis

404
Same .. to Mr. M'Can, 21st September, 1798,-Hughes’s Evidence 405
Wm. Dowdall to Mr. Grattan, 6th October, 1798,-Neilson's Evidence 409
Samuel Neilson to Mr. Grattan, 5th October, 1798,- Report of Secret
Committee-his Evidence

410
Mr. Grattan to the Rev. Richard Bermingham, 23rd October, 1798,-
Guild of Merchants' resolution against him

411
Same .. to Mr. M‘Can, 27th October, 1798,-Hughes's Evidence 412
Same to Mr. Fox, 20th October, 1798, on their removal from
the Privy Council

412

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October,

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Same... to Mr. Erskine, ist November, 1798,- His statement on

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the Report of House of Lords

413
Mr. Erskine to Mr. Grattan, Nov. 1798,--His opinion on the case

414
Mr. Grattan to the Editor of the Courier, 9th November, 1798,-On

the conduct of the Guild of Merchants and the Dublin
University

416
Same .. to Mr. Berwick, 10th November, 1798,-Lords' Com-
mittee Report-Neilson's evidence

419
Same .. to same, 15th November, 1798,-On the attacks upon him 420
Same .. to Mr. M'Can, 18th November, 1798,-On Hughes's visit
to Tinnehinch

421
Same to Mr. Berwick, 30th November, 1798,--Politics of
the day

422
Same .. to same-On the Corporation of Derry

422
Samuel Neilson to the Editor of the Morning Chronicle as to Mr. Grattan 422
Wm. Dowdall to Mr. Grattan, December, 1798,-On Bird's intima-
tion of the attempts against Mr. Grattan

425
Same .. to J. Bird, as to Mr. Grattan

. 426
J. Bird to Mr. Grattan, 1st December, 1798,-As to the attempts
against Mr. Grattan

426
Mr. Grattan to Mr. Fox, 6th December, 1798,-Lords' Report, and
conduct of Irish Ministers

429
Same .. to same, 20th anuary, 1799,–On the rejection of
the Union

434
Mr. Fox to Mr. Grattan, 4th February, 1799,-On the Union . 435
440
Same .. to same, 8th September, Prepares to return to Ireland 441

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• 437

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Henry Dundas to the Earl of Mornington as to Ireland and the Union 436
Marquess Cornwallis to the Earl of Mornington as to Ireland

437
Same .. to same, as to Ireland and the Union
Mrs. Grattan to Mr. M'Can, 5th March, 1799,-On Mr. Grattan's
health

· 438
Same to same, 10th April, 1799,

ditto

• 438
Same to same, 11th May, 1799,

ditto

• 439
Same to same, 15th May,--Dilapidations at Tinnehinch 439
Same to same, 29th June,-Goes to Isle of Wight

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LIFE AND CORRESPONDENCE

OF

HENRY GRATTAN.

CHAPTER I.

The rights of the City of Dublin invaded—Conduct of the Lord Chan

cellor on Mr. Curran's speech before the Privy Council-Adverse decision-Indignation of the people-Proceedings of the Whig Club, and their vindication in reply to the Chancellor's attack—Meeting of the citizens of Dublin-Their resolutions-Letters of Mr. Grattan to Mr. M‘Can, Mr. Day, and the Rev. Edward Berwick-Mr. Foster chosen Speaker of the new parliament, Responsibility Bill— Mr

Grattan's letter to Mr. Day on that subject. Not satisfied with his successful proceedings against the opposition, the Chancellor (Lord Clare), now sought to quell the popular spirit that prevailed in the metropolis, and he involved the Government in a squabble with the city. Alderman James had been appointed Commissioner of the Police; he set up as candidate for the office of Lord Mayor, under the patronage of the Government, and was chosen by the Aldermen, but rejected by the Commons,* who selected Alderman Howison, a popular individual. In such a case, the custom was, that the Aldermen should send down the name of another candidate. This they declined to do, and insisted that Alder

* These bodies sat apart, the board of aldermen resembled the Upper House, the sheriffs and common councilmen the Lower; a fair representation for the city, had they not been corrupted and prejudiced by the castle.

VOL. IV. n.

B

man James was elected. The approbation of the Privy Council being necessary to confirm the election of the Lord Mayor, both parties appealed to that body on behalf of their respective candidates. The case was argued before them, Doctor Duigenan defending Alderman James, and George Ponsonby, and Mr. Curran, Alderman Howison. The result was that the council sent the parties to a new election.

It was on this occasion, that Mr. Curran made a splendid speech, in which he alluded to Lord Clare, and portrayed his character in colours which could not be mistaken, and the brilliancy of which will never fade. His description of Ireland was spirited and patriotic; his description of Lord Clare was just, eloquent and severe, and conveyed the most caustic satire in the most polished style, — which latter quality is not

always to be found in Curran's speaking. But a long metaphorical invective was not perhaps the best mode of encountering Lord Clare. Curran had beforehand mentioned that he meant to attack him; so that he was immediately stopped : for though the Lord-lieutenant (who is the head of that court) was present, yet Lord Clare assumed the right to direct, and accordingly he cleared the chamber. This, however, did not prevent the publication of the speech and the invective. But if Curran had pressed very hard on the legal opinion of the Chancellor, which in point of law was quite wrong, and had delivered some very hard sentences before he could have been stopped, he would have borne him down, and his success would have been more complete. Curran, however, did neither.

The Chancellor never forgave this attack; the picture was too like; there was no mistaking it, and in consequence he fatally revenged himself

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