The letters of Junius, Volum 1

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J. Wheble, 1771
 

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Authorship still in debate. Political letters swayed public opinion Les hele vurderingen

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Side 126 - I have described would never prostitute his dignity in parliament by an indecent violence either in opposing or defending a minister.
Side 78 - ... before he happily arrived at the caput mortuum of vitriol in your Grace. Flat and insipid in your retired state, but brought into action, you become vitriol again. Such are the extremes of alternate indolence or fury, which have governed your whole administration.
Side 78 - ... troops. Stand forth, my lord ; for thou art the man. Lord Bute found no resource of dependence or security in the proud, imposing superiority of Lord Chatham's abilities, the shrewd, inflexible judgment of Mr. Grenville, nor in the mild but determined integrity of Lord Rockingham.
Side 14 - Providence, it were possible for us to escape a crisis so full of terror and despair, posterity will not believe the history of the present times. They will either conclude that our distresses were imaginary, or that we had the good fortune to be governed by men of acknowledged integrity and wisdom : they will not believe it possible that their ancestors could have survived...
Side 199 - ... and leave it to themselves to determine, by their conduct at a future election, whether or...
Side 77 - You have now carried things too far to retreat. You have plainly declared to the people what they are to expect from the continuance of your administration. It is time for your Grace to consider what you also may expect in return from their spirit and their resentment.
Side 67 - First lived and died a hypocrite. Charles the Second was a hypocrite of another sort, and should have died upon the same scaffold. At the distance of a century, we see their different characters happily revived, and blended in your grace. Sullen and severe without religion, profligate without gaiety, you live like Charles the Second, without being an amiable companion, and, for aught I know, may die as his father did, without the reputation of a martyr.
Side 186 - The circumstances to which you are reduced will not admit of a compromise with the English nation. Undecisive...
Side 194 - The Praetorian bands, enervated and debauched as they were, had still strength enough to awe the Roman populace: but when the distant legions took the alarm, they marched to Rome, and gave away the empire.
Side 123 - Cautious therefore of giving offence where you have so little deserved it, I shall leave the illustration of your virtues to other hands. Your friends have a privilege to play upon the easiness of your temper, or possibly they are better acquainted with your good qualities than I am.

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