The Plurality of Worlds: With an Introduction by Edward Hitchcock

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Gould and Lincoln, 1855 - 368 sider

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Side 23 - O rack me not to such a vast extent; Those distances belong to thee: The world's too little for thy tent, A grave too big for me.
Side 271 - Look then abroad through nature, to the range Of planets, suns, and adamantine spheres, Wheeling unshaken through the void immense; And speak, O man ! does this capacious scene With half that kindling majesty dilate Thy strong conception, as when Brutus rose Refulgent from the stroke of...
Side 68 - Far other life you live, far other tongue You talk, far other thought, perhaps, you think, Than man. How various are the works of God! But say, what thought?
Side 336 - The recognition of an ideal exemplar for the vertebrated animals, proves that the knowledge of such a being as man must have existed before man appeared. For the Divine Mind which planned the archetype also foreknew all its modifications. The archetypal idea was manifested in the flesh, under divers modifications, upon this planet, long prior to the existence of those animal species that actually exemplify it.
Side 351 - Ask for what end the heavenly bodies shine, Earth for whose use? Pride answers, " 'Tis for mine: For me kind nature wakes her genial power, Suckles each herb, and spreads out every flower; Annual for me, the grape, the rose renew The juice nectareous, and the balmy dew ; For me, the mine a thousand treasures brings; For me health gushes from a thousand springs; Seas roll to waft...
Side 129 - The intelligent part of creation is thrust into the compass of a few years, in the course of myriads of ages ; why not then into the compass of a few miles, in the expanse of systems...
Side 141 - Taking the apparent semidiameter of the nubecula major at 3°, and regarding its solid form as, roughly speaking, spherical, its nearest and most remote parts differ in their distance from us by a little more than a tenth part of our distance from its centre.
Side 260 - Look how the floor of heaven Is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold. There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st But in his motion like an angel sings, Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubims : Such harmony is in immortal souls ; But whilst this muddy vesture of decay Doth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it.

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