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THE LADIES' REPOSITORY.

CINCINNATI MARCUT

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He sees that in obedience to toil, he receives the allot- || shall he not apprehend his imminent necessity—that ted pittance; he says it is enough for me and my chil. looking for of judgment to come? Yes, there is a

nrinciple within the soul of man sufficient, with proper

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THE LADIES' REPOSITORY.

CINCINNATI, MARCH, 1842.

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CALDWELL-LAKE GEORGE. Christ's faithful ministers. The second order is made (SEE ENGRAVING.)

up of the sanctified, or mature saints, who are ever LAKE GEORGE, the state of New York, is con-moving on the errands of love, and ministering not only nected with Lake Champlain, and is in some respects, to each other’s necessities, but also to the bodily or spirthe most remarkable body of water on the continent.itual wants of any of God's creatures within their reach. Such is its purity, that from the neighboring inhabitants The third order consists of the justified, or immature it has received the name of Lake Sacrament. It is said saints, who are employed in the same services as the to be chiefly fed by surrounding springs, and it empties former, but in a more humble sphere; such as is suited its waters into the south end of Lake Champlain, above to the weakness of their infant states. These are evanwhich it is elevated about one hundred feet. It is of gelical hierarchies, which for their office and ministry late years much frequented by travelers, loungers, and are indebted to grace. sportsmen. Many of those who have sailed on its But there are orders of nature as well as of grace. bosom, give very glowing descriptions of its varying They grow out of our private and public relations. and interesting aspects. The shadows of the moun- The monarch and the subordinate magistrate are “mintains passing over its clear, glassy waters, and the vary- isters of God” to the people, and may in their office be ing tints and shades thrown upon it by the sunbeams || called angels. Leaders of armies and subalterns—the reflected from the scenery of its shores, together with commanders of vessels, and all other unusurping authorthe majestic and enchanting character of that scenery ities, who have a perpetual or temporary official supeto the eye of him who has a relish for the bold and wild riority and care over a given number of persons, may, in nature, are said to present a tout ensemble of almost as to their functions, be called angels, for they minister, unequaled interest. Caldwell is a small town at the and angel is a name of that kind of office. The relations end of the Lake, much frequented by visitors. of professional and private life are of the same nature.

The teacher ministers to the pupil; the physician and

the nurse to the patient; the patron or benefactor to the Original.

object of his kindness. THE MOTHER AN ANGEL.

But I wish to select one other example from private life, which possibly surpasses all others, so far as the

privileges and obligations of nature are concerned. I “ How sweet to gaze upon thy placid brow,

refer to the mother. In a sense peculiarly high and My child! my child! like some unfolding bud

holy, she is an angel to her child. And this by the ap-
Of stainless snow.drop. Ah, how sweet in catch pointment, the power, the usages, and the fidelity of
Thy gentle breath upon my cheek, and feel
The bright replundance of thy silken hair,
My beautiful first-born. Life seems more fair

She is such by the appointment of nature. By this
Since thou art mine. How soon amid ils flowers I mean, that from the beginning, nature places the
Thy little feet will gambol by my side,

mother in such a relation to the child, that she only can My own pet lamb. And then to train thee up

afford the necessary ministrations. Hers are vital funcTo be an angel, and to live for GodO glorious hope!"

MRS. SIGOURNEY.

tions, in which the very being of the child is involved.

How affecting is this consideration to one who has firm Angel is said to be a name of office. It is therefore confidence in the doctrine of the soul's immortality. applied to mortals. The Scriptures, as in the Apoc And the fact cannot be disputed. Hence the assertion lypse, denominate the ministers of Jesus, angels.* 'The that by the appointment of nature, (by which I mean word äggeros signifies messenger, and may justly be ap- the appointment of God,) the mother is an angel to her plied to one employed by Providence, in some holy ser-child. The ministrations of God's invisible, celestial vice for the good and happiness of others. For these messengers, in behalf of mortals, do not commence so appointees of Jehovah are ministering messengers. early as hers. The infant passes under the watch and The celestial angels are "spirits, sent forth to minister ward of angels from the mother's earlier keeping. The to them who shall be heirs of salvation."

sacred treasure, with its immortal jewelry, is primarily In heaven the angels are supposed to constitute va- intrusted to her custody; and by a divine constitution rious hierarchies. The Jews held that the orders were of things, all the unwearied energies of her nature are four—those of Michael, of Gabriel, of Uriel, and of | at first spontaneously, and afterwards with the zeal of Raphael. of terrestrial angels there are certainly sev- glowing affection, pledged to the execution of her trust. eral orders. The first, or highest order, is composed of Thus by the appointment of the God of nature, she is

an angel-a minister of life and its supports to her * See Revelations, chapter ii.

child.

BY THE EDITOR.

nature.

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THE MOTHER AN ANGEL.

And this she is, secondly, by the power of nature; | as the world is, it retains traces enough of its primitive by which I mean, that as, according to the existing constitutional features, to abhor a mother's disaffection economy of nature, none other can, so by the same to, or her neglect of her offspring, as contrary to nature, economy, the mother does minister to the child. She and as indicative of a depth of depravity which no other is abundantly furnished for her office. This is proven act of sin and shame can equal. Thus, while the by all the indications of nature. Her maternal affec- mother stands as the appointee of the God of nature tions, as already hinted, are unfathomable and inex-to guard and cherish the physical and moral being of haustible. She is prepared to meet every demand upon her child, the world spontaneously pays her homage, her patience; every sacrifice of comfort, and case, and and dare not interrupt her. If she fail to execute the reputation, and health, and at last, of life itself, for the functions of her office, hers is the sin—her unfaithfulsake of her child. There is no such love as hers among ness shall be upon her own head. For that God who mortals—none so deep, so abiding, and so self-sacrific- made her an angel to her child, gave none else a like ing; or if this be disputed, none certainly that runs commission, and even published to the world by the back like hers to the fountain of being, taking its rise, strong voice of nature that of mortals, she alone was as it were, at the throne of God, by whose commandmade the nurse and guardian of its life and immortaliits streams flow out and become prolific of life on earth ties. Thus by the very usages of nature, or of society and in heaven.

under the dictation of nature, the mother is an angel But the economy of nature empowers the mother to to her child. minister not only to the physical, but also to the men And this she is, lastly, by the fidelity of nature. By tal and moral necessities of her child. She is the first this I mean, that such is the state of her affections toprophet whose mission is accredited, and the first whose wards her child, that she would spontaneously and oracles are heard and revered. See how the smiling gladly endure the toil, and make the sacrifices necessary babe, reposing on the bosom of maternal tenderness, to a faithful execution of her trust. Whatever her mafixes its gaze of deep attention on the moving eye and ternal errors are, they do not generally arise from disaflip of its parent. Speechless as it is, it is even now fection, or from a want of love to her offspring. How gathering from the expression of her features food for can they, when that love is the strongest passion of her its thought, and examples for its carriage. Her calm heart? when she willingly foregoes pleasure and comor passionate—her meek or haughty behavior, are fort and ease on her child's account? when she stands already impressing its unformed mind and heart, with ready at any moment to expose and sacrifice her life to sentiments which wait for development in the progress guard it? Surely with such feelings she would not of coming years. Her brooding fondness, as she sits willfully expose her child in its person or its choicest day by day cherishing its young and growing life, is interests to harm and ruin. No; nature, the parent of nourishing in its immortal affections the dove or the those glowing affections in the mother's bosom, which serpent—a heaven of holiness, or a hell of poisonous so tenderly embrace, and would so promptly guard her and destructive passions. So true is this, that there are child at every hazard and sacrifice, has imparted to her few of the saved or the lost who enjoyed in infancy a a spirit of fidelity which we can never sufficiently admother's protection, but will trace their felicity or de- mire. God has impressed her very constitution with a spair in a fature world to maternal fidelity or unfaith- law which binds her to maternal fidelity, and renders it fulness. Such, by nature, is the power of the mother peculiarly proper to say she is guardian to her child. over the nursling of her heart. She is to it an angel Why, then, in so many fatal instances do we see the of light, or a demon of destruction.

mother's efforts thwarted, and her ardent affections buThirdly; she is the same by the usage of nature. sied in vain, to guide her child so as to secure it from That is, in all nations and ages, the same indications fatal misfortunes? This question is as interesting as of nature exist; and they seem to be universally re- the facts which suggest it are sad and distressing. In spected. There was never a people so at war with replying to it, I shall maintain the analogy with which nature and her dictates, as to disregard her monitions I started, and still view the mother as a ministering in this particular. Such a thing was not possible; be- | messenger to her child. cause, if humanity in any age or nation became imbru We must reflect then, that there has been a great ted, even the beasts are subject to the same law. The revolution in heaven. In the beginning all the angels dam instinctively feeds and defends its young. were holy. They were perfectly pure in affection and

Mankind in all ages have paid respect to maternal faithful in obedience. They were employed in the ser rights, and regarded its affections and its functions as vice of their Maker, and their bliss flowed from his apholy. For early nurture and culture, the child is resign-probation and smile. But it was so in the progress of ed by common consent to the sympathies and energies his government, that a portion of them became guilty of her who alone is believed to have the resources, phys- of defection from the law and the love of their Maker. ical and moral, for so burdensome and wearisome a toil. They rebelled, and were driven from their thrones, and She is not interrupted or hindered in her work, but despoiled of their dominions. They were still angels, contrariwise, is by the silent suffrage of the world, de- retaining I suppose, faintly at least, all their original signated as the nominee of nature to the holy office attributes, except moral purity, which gave place to the which she fills. Furthermore-fallen and depraved Il most malignant passions, and turned their new abode

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THE MOTHER AN ANGEL.

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into hell. As angels, they still ministered in the king-|| account. He blinds people to the consequences of their doms of God, but not beneficently, as heretofore—not conduct. He sweetens the poisoned dish, which he to the good and happiness, but to the injury, and if puts into the hand of the mother; and she finding it possible, to the ruin of the creatures.

pleasant to her own, ministers it with fatal zeal to the When this world was created and man was formed taste of her child. to tenant it under the smile of God, these fallen angels Of all evil angels on earth, (I had well nigh said in attempted its ruin. In a measure they succeeded. hel!,) none are so injurious to the virtue and happiness They brought down the honor of our race, and laid it of mankind as these fond, but infanticidal mothers. If in the dust. This they accomplished by making man their evil agency but killed the body, it were bad enough; the agent of his own undoing—by leading him through but alas! it destroys the soul. It nourishes an existreacherous persuasion to rebel, like themselves, against tence which many a child will deprecate as a curse their Maker. Our rebellion produced in us the same for ever. And they themselves will be witnesses. An moral effect which had followed in them their treachery impious mother, moved by the instigation of the devil, to God. Our affections, which till then were pure as can do more than all the world beside to make her child the light of heaven, and benevolent as the purposes of a demon. And she does it. She may never dream of its throne, became earthly, sensual and devilish. From such a thing, but she guides her little one to perdition. that sad hour, grace, which came to our fallen world | She is its pioneer to the pit. She is its angel, but alas ! through the death of Jesus, has operated to check these she is a fallen angel. Ordained by Providence to train diabolical human passions, and over all willing and its young affections for the pure felicities of heaven, she waiting hearts gains a perfect moral conquest, by which is betrays her sacred trust, and fashions the soul which the subdued are made holy, and are employed once owed to her its very being for the unutterable agonies more as angels of light, in ministering to the needy of of despair. How? Like Satan in paradise, she chooses God's creatures. Others remain the servants of Satan, for it probibited delights-fruits which God pronounced and in league with fallen, invisible spirits, are constantly poisonous to the soul. First she gives it an example inflicting evil and misery.

of indulgence. When that fails, she whispers to it It follows, then, that there are two sorts of angels, encouragement to partake. When it turns to flee good and evil, in the invisible and in the visible world. under the strivings of God's Spirit, she allures it back In the invisible they are separated, occupying different hy soothing, deceitful words. With tones as treacherhabitations called heaven and hell; but here they areous as ever waked the echoes of the infernal dungeons, distinguished simply by their feelings and conduct, and she guides the reluctant hand of her child, who plucks, not by outward appearance or classification. The good eats, and is damned for ever. Well may she be called and evil angels in human form sustain, in common, the a FALLEN ANGEL. various public and private relations which belong to The pious mother is an angel of light. She vigithis world, such as result from constitutional compacts | lantly watches every influence which approaches her and civil governments, and from the more intimate alli-child, averting the evil and invoking the good. With ances of domestic life.

the pure and steady affections of devotion, she pleads Every human being is in his relations an angel of in prayer for the new-born spirit which God has aplight or an angel of darkness. The magistrate, the pointed her to guard and cherish. Her voice of devoteacher, the physician, the patron, the neighbor, the tion whispers to the fondling the name of Jesus, and friend, the member of a domestic circle over which he the unwearied energies of her devotion lead the little exerts any power, are all good or evil angels, to shed a one up the cross-bearing steeps of religion towards the pure or corrupt influence in a limited sphere. With throne and the bosom of God. Will angels be ashamed regard to the evil it may be observed, that Satan chiefly of that sister spirit? Will Jesus refuse to confess her carries on his work of destruction in human souls by in their presence? Will God be displeased to hear his setting depraved mortals to ruin one another. He can well beloved Son say to her, “Come, ye blessed of my appear to advantage in the form of man, because we do Father?” Heaven is the proper home of such an one. not instinctively dread or suspect our own species. Her sanctified spirit will be native to the regions which And when he can approach us through those who are, I glow in the light of that holiness whose intense effulas Eve was by Adam, especially loved and confided in, gence circles and pervades them for ever. he is most sure of conquest. Now none are so fully Well may we exclaim, THE MOTHER!! O the sig. confided in as the mother. Childhood is credulous, nificancy of that word! It suggests to the reflecting and its confidence is easily won even by strangers; but mind a scene more sublime than exists in the circle of towards a mother that confidence is spontaneous and creation. Connect it and its influences with probation, universal, approving all her acts and words, be they eternity, heaven and hell, and you will concede what I right or wrong. And so far as affection would warrant affirm. As to the faithful matron, who is the instruthis confidence, it is not misplaced, since scarcely a ment of salvation to her child, angels might envy her. mother can be found who does not desire the happiness | As to the godless mother, who is the instrument of her of her child, and purpose to promote it.

child's undoing, fiends themselves might fly her presBut Satan does not destroy in his agents the natural ence, accounting her too flagrantly vile to be received affections. He rather strives to turn them to his own llinto the society of reprobate spirits.

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