American Electrical Cases (cited Am Electl. Cas.): Being a Collection of All the Important Cases (excepting Patent Cases) Decided in the State and Federal Courts of the United States from 1873 [to 1908] on Subjects Relating to the Telegraph, the Telephone, Electric Light and Power, Electric Railway, and All Other Practical Uses of Electricity, with Annotations, Volum 1

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William Weeks Morrill
M. Bender, 1894
 

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Side 381 - ... such as may fairly and reasonably be considered either arising naturally, ie according to the usual course of things, from such breach of contract itself, or such as may reasonably be supposed to have been in the contemplation of both parties, at the time they made the contract, as the probable result of the breach of it.
Side 366 - Now, if the special circumstances under which the contract was actually made were communicated by the plaintiffs to the defendants, and thus known to both parties, the damages resulting from the breach of such a contract, which they would reasonably contemplate, would be the amount of injury which would ordinarily follow from a breach of contract under these special circumstances so known and communicated.
Side 776 - It is agreed between the sender of the following message and this company that said company shall not be liable for mistakes or delays in the transmission or delivery, or for nondelivery, of any unrepeated message, whether happening by negligence of its servants or otherwise, beyond the amount received for sending the same...
Side 760 - An Act to aid in the Construction of Telegraph Lines, and to secure to the Government the use of the same for postal, military and other purposes...
Side 595 - Where two parties have made a contract which one of them has broken, the damages which the other party ought to receive in respect of such breach of contract should be such as may fairly and reasonably be considered either arising naturally...
Side 155 - These contracts are not articles of commerce in any proper meaning of the word. They are not subjects of trade and barter offered in the market as something having an existence and value independent of the parties to them. They are not commodities to be shipped or forwarded from one State to another, and then put up for sale.
Side 706 - They extend from the horse with its rider to the stage coach, from the sailing vessel to the steamboat, from the coach and the steamboat to the railroad, and from the railroad to the telegraph, as these new agencies are successively brought into use to meet the demands of increasing population and wealth. They were intended for the government of the business to which they relate, at all times and under all circumstances.
Side 377 - A telegraph company occupies the same relation to commerce as a carrier of messages, that a railroad company does as a carrier of goods.
Side 161 - If these premises were true, the conclusion drawn from them would be inevitable. This mere private corporation, engaged in its own business, with its own views, would certainly be subject to the taxing power of the State, as any individual would be...
Side 162 - The principle we are discussing has its limitation, a limitation growing out of the necessity on which the principle itself is founded. That limitation is, that the agencies of the Federal government are only exempted from State legislation, so far as that legislation may interfere with, or impair their efficiency in performing the functions by which they are designed to serve that government.

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