Letters from Washington, on the Constitution and Laws: With Sketches of Some of the Prominent Public Characters of the United States. Written During the Winter of 1817-18

Forside
J. Gideon, junr., 1818 - 139 sider
 

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Utvalgte sider

Innhold

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 86 - In its foundation it is federal, not national ; in the sources from which the ordinary powers of the government are drawn, it is partly federal, and partly national ; in the operation of these powers, it is national, not federal ; in the extent of them again, it is federal, not national ; and finally in the authoritative mode of introducing amendments, it is neither wholly federal, nor wholly national.
Side 66 - In a short time the whole man is changed, and every object of his former delight is relinquished. No more he enjoys the tranquil scene ; it has become flat and insipid to his taste. His books are abandoned. His retort and crucible are thrown aside. His shrubbery blooms and breathes its fragrance upon the air in vain ; he likes it not. His ear no longer drinks the rich melody of music ; it longs for the trumpet's clangour and the cannon's roar.
Side 19 - Constitution to give to Congress from time to time information of the state of the Union...
Side 67 - ... were deliberately spread for him, and overwhelmed by the mastering spirit and genius of another, — this man, thus ruined and undone, and made to play a subordinate part in this grand drama of guilt and treason, — this man is to be called the principal offender ; while he, by whom he was thus plunged...
Side 89 - The Third Amendment in its prohibition against the quartering of soldiers "in any house" in time of peace without the consent of the owner is another facet of that privacy.
Side 89 - In all criminal prosecutions the accused shall enjoy the right of a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury...
Side 65 - Ohio, he rears upon it a palace and decorates it with every romantic embellishment of fancy. A shrubbery, that Shenstone might have envied, blooms around him. Music, that might have charmed Calypso and her nymphs, is his. An extensive library spreads its treasures before him. A philosophical apparatus offers to him all the secrets and mysteries of nature. Peace, tranquillity, and innocence shed their mingled delights around him.
Side 121 - Can storied urn, or animated bust, Back to its mansion call the fleeting breath ? Can Honor's voice provoke the silent dust, Or Flattery soothe the dull cold ear of Death...
Side 2 - In conformity to the act of Congress of the United States, entitled, " An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned ;
Side 67 - ... man, thus ruined and undone and made to play a subordinate part in this grand drama of guilt and treason, this man is to be called the principal offender, while he, by whom he was thus plunged in misery, is comparatively innocent, a mere accessory!

Bibliografisk informasjon