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that we have to imitate their virtues, and to follow their examples wherein they followed the Master. If this be true, then we may bring together the hymns of writers of different religious communions, from the ancient leaves of the Roman Breviary to the all but rhapsodical strains of the field preach

The Compiler has not been careful in all cases to assure. himself that each poem is copied with exactness from the author whose name is attached to it. Many of the hymns most in use have been repeatedly altered, restored, and real

the alteration being sometimes to their great improvement in language or sentiment. Any such alteration seems to be allowable, with this single restriction-other restrictions of justice and propriety being of course implied—that no stanza, line, or word of a hymn, be so changed as to attribute to the writer whose name attached to it, a sentiment or doctrine conflicting with the belief or opinions he himself expresses. Dr. Watts, who, by general consent, is the richest of all our lyrical poets, has written hymns and parts of hymns which would scarcely be accepted now in any church in Christendom. An occasional alteration of the sentiment even, in some of his pieces, seems to be more allowable than in the case of other writers, because it is on record that his religious opinions having undergone a change in a late period of his life, he himself wished to alter essentially some of his hymns, to which, however, the owner of the copyright would not assent.

This collection being designed to contain only such hymns as could be used appropriately in the public services of the sanctuary, some favorite pieces will be missed, as not coming under this condition. A few well known hymns, of a character of which a specimen is found in that beginning,

The hour of my departure's come,

are excluded, because, though beautiful for the household or sick chamber, they could not be used in public worship. Children's hymns are for a like reason excluded. Some others are left out because the sentiments they express cannot be truly attributed, as they are attributed, to all the members of

a promiscuous congregation. Of this class of hymns is one in most of the books beginning,

"God of mercy, God of love,

Hear our sad, repentant song;
Sorrow dwells on every face,
Penitence on every tongue."

A few other familiar hymns have been excluded, because of their strange confounding of Christian with heathen sentiments and feelings, as in the hymn, beginning,

"I would not live alway, I ask not to stay."

It is no part of Christian faith or feeling to contemn the scenes of man's earthly trial and happiness, nor shall we be likely to quench our excessive love for the world, by heaping upon it reproachful epithets.

A Hymn-Book, well used and improved, stands next to the Bible among the means for religious education. The sacred lines, associated with the youngest thoughts of religion, help to guide and direct mature years: they rise to remembrance in the solitary walk, or amid the occupations of duty: they come as memorials of the dead and the unseen, either to comfort or to warn : they cheer the loneliness of travel afar from home : they tremble often on the lips of the dying as the last effort of parting life to connect earth with heaven. Much of the contents of this volume has already long been blessed of God, through Christ, for such a holy and enduring ministry. May this volume be acceptable at least to the Society for which it was compiled, and whenever it is necessary may the treasures which it contains be united with others in a better form.

GEORGE E. ELLIS. Charlestoron, April, 1845.

A*

INDEX OF FIRST LINES.

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According to thy gracious word,
A charge to keep I have,
Adore, my soul, that awful name,
Affliction's faded form draws nigh,
Again our ears have heard the voice,
Again the Lord of life and light, .
Ah, wretched souls, who strive in vain,
All earthly charms, however dear,
All hail, the power of Jesus' name,
All nature's works his praise declare,
All powerful, self-existent God,
All-seeing God ! 't is thine to know, .
All ye nations, praise the Lord,
Almighty God, in humble prayer,
Almighty God, thy wondrous works,
Almighty God, thy word is cast,
Almighty King, whose wondrous hand,
Almighty Maker! Lord of all!
Am I a soldier of the cross?
Amidst a world of hopes and fears,
And art thou with us, gracious Lord,
And is the Gospel peace and love ?
And now my soul, another year, .
Angel, roll the stone away,
Another fleeting day is gone,
Another six days' work is done,
Around Bethesda's healing wave,
As body when the soul has fled,
As every day thy mercy spares,
Asleep in Jesus! Blessed sleep!
As o'er the past my memory strays,
A soldier's course, from battles won,
As the hart, with eager looks, .
As the sun's enlivening eye,
As various as the moon,
At God's command, the morning ray,

Hymn.

352
. 405

596
514
82
59
315
347
285
647
192
339

92
414
188
212

17
410
346
411
499
258
622
. 282
. 118

45
263
. 309

125
574
626
312
446
658
465
140

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381
. 245
317

112
. 313

311
310
529
62

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Author of good, to thee we turn,
A voice from the desert comes awful and shrill,
Awake, my drowsy soul, awake, .
Awake, my soul, and with the sun,
Awake, my soul! lift up thine eyes!
Awake, my soul! stretch every nerve,
Awake, our souls, away our fears,
Awake, ye saints, and raise your eyes,
Away from every mortal care,
Before Jehovah's awful throne,
Begin, my soul, the exalted lay,
Behold my servant, see him rise,
Behold the amazing sight, ·
Behold the blind their sight receive,.
Behold, the lofty sky,.
Behold the man; how glorious he,
Behold the morning sun,
Behold the path which mortals tread,
Behold the Prince of peace,
Behold the Saviour on the cross,
Behold the western evening light,
Behold where, breathing love divine,
Behold where, in a mortal form,
Be it my only wisdom here,
Beneath our feet, and o'er our head,
Beset with snares on every hand,
Be with me, Lord, where'er I go,
Beyond, beyond that boundless sea,
Blessed' be the everlasting God,
Bless, O my soul, the living God,
Blest are the humble souls that see, .
“Blest are the meek,” he said,
Blest are the pure in heart,
Blest are the sons of peace,
Blest are the souls that hear and know,
Blest day of God, most calm, most bright,
Blest Instructer, from thy ways, •
Blest is the man who fears the Lord,
Bound upon the accursed tree,
Bread of heaven, on thee we feed,
Bright was the guiding star that led,
Brother, thou art gone before us, .
By cool Siloam's shady rill,

25

42
. 236
279
248
206
270
213
552
260
278
556
252
253
388
.553
320
408
127
600
146
327
328
. 330
329
232

49
. 377
. 306
. 276
. 359

243
. 564
. 425

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