History of Education

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Scribner, 1919 - 461 sider
 

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Side 281 - A SOUND mind in a sound body, is a short but full description of a happy state in this world : he that has these two, has little more to wish for ; and he that wants either of them, will be but little the better for any thing else.
Side 376 - I thank God, there are no free schools nor printing, and I hope we shall not have these hundred years. For learning has brought disobedience and heresy, and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them, and libels against the best government. God keep us from both"!
Side 386 - Nor am I less persuaded, that you will agree with me in opinion, that there is nothing which can better deserve your patronage than the promotion of science and literature.
Side 265 - I call therefore a complete and generous education that which fits a man to perform justly, skilfully, and magnanimously all the offices both private and public of peace and war.
Side 283 - As the strength of the body lies chiefly in being able to endure hardships, so also does that of the mind. And the great principle and foundation of all virtue and worth is placed in this, that a man is able to deny himself his own desires, cross his own inclinations, and purely follow what reason directs as best, though the appetite lean the other way.
Side 426 - What knowledge is of most worth? the uniform reply is — science. This is the verdict in all the counts. For direct selfpreservation or the maintenance of life and health, the all-important knowledge is — science. For that indirect self-preservation which we call gaining a livelihood, the knowledge of greatest value is — science. For the due discharge of parental functions, the proper guidance is to be found only in — science. For...
Side 285 - Just so it is in the mind; would you have a man reason well, you must use him to it betimes, exercise his mind in observing the connexion of ideas, and following them in train. Nothing does this better than mathematics; which, therefore, I think should be taught all those who have the time and opportunity ; not so much to make them mathematicians, as to make them reasonable creatures...
Side 430 - Bear constantly in mind the truth that the aim of your discipline should be to produce a self-governing being ; not to produce a being to be governed by others. Were your children fated to pass their lives as slaves, you could not too much accustom them to slavery during their childhood ; but as they are...
Side 379 - Whereas, the prosperity and welfare of any people depend, in a great measure, upon the good education of youth, and their early introduction in the principles of true religion and virtue, and qualifying them to serve their country and themselves...
Side 377 - Virginia, have had it in their minds, and have proposed to themselves, to the end that the Church of Virginia may be furnished with a seminary of ministers of the gospel, and that the youth may be piously educated in good letters and manners, and that the Christian faith may be propagated amongst the Western Indians, to the glory of Almighty God...

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