The practical draughtsman's book of industrial design, tr. from the [Nouveau cours raisonné de dessin industriel] of m. Armengaud, ainé, and mm. Armengaud, jeune, and Amouroux. Rewritten and arranged, with additional matter

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Side 198 - But every man who rises above the common level has received two educations : the first from his teachers ; the second, more personal and important, from himself.
Side 3 - ... and the Builder ; and by its aid only, is the Inventor enabled to express his views before he attempts to realise them. Boyle has remarked, in his early times, that the excellence of manufactures, and the facility of labour, would be much promoted, if the various expedients and contrivances which lie concealed in private hands, were, by reciprocal communications, made generally known ; for there are few operations that are not performed by one or other with some peculiar advantages, which, though...
Side 160 - Rule : Multiply the square of the diameter of the cylinder in inches by the cube root of the stroke in feet, and divide the product by 47. The quotient is the nominal horse-power of the engine.
Side 47 - It is demonstrated in geometry, that the square of the hyjiothcuuse, or longest side of a right-angled triangle, is equal to the sum of the squares of the two sides forming the right angle. It follows from this property, that if any two of the sides of a right-angled triangle be given, the third may be at once ascertained. First, If the sides forming the right angle be given, the hypothenuse is determined by adding together their squares, and extracting the square root. Example. — The side, AB,...
Side 25 - When a measure is taken on any of the sectoral lines beginning at the centre, it is called a lateral distance ; but when a measure is taken from any point on one line to its corresponding point on the line of the same denomination on the other leg, it is called a transverse or parallel distance. The divisions of each sectoral line are...
Side 25 - ... equal to one another, but unequal to the angle made by all the other pairs of lines. The solution of questions on the sector is said to be simple when the work is begun and ended upon the same pair of lines ; compound, when the operation is begun upon one pair of lines and finished upon another. In a compound solution the two pairs of lines used must make equal angles at the...
Side 92 - When this is done, the pitch circle is rorrectly divided into as many equal parts as there are to be teeth. The compasses are then to be opened to an extent of one and a quarter of those divisions, and with this radius arcs are described on each side of every division on the pitch line a, a, from that line to the line d, d. One point of the compasses being set on c, .the curve f, g, on one side of one tooth...
Side 104 - THE FALL OF BODIES. 258. When bodies fall freely of their own weight, the velocities which they acquire are proportionate to the time during which they have fallen, whilst the spaces passed through are as the squares of the times. It has been ascertained by experiment that a body falling freely from a state of rest, passes through a distance of 16 feet and a small fraction, in the first second of time. At the end of this time it has a velocity equal to twice this distance per second. From this it...
Side 102 - These are usually accounted six in number, viz. the Lever, the Wheel and Axle, the Pulley, the Inclined Plane, the Wedge, and the Screw.
Side 26 - Example. — To adjust the Sector as a Scale of One Inch to Four Chains. — Make one inch the transverse distance of 4 and 4 ; then the transverse distances of the other corresponding divisions and subdivisions will represent the number of chains and links indicated by these divisions : thus, the transverse distance from 3 to 3 will represent three chains ; the transverse distance at...

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