The Origin and History of the English Language: And of the Early Literature it Embodies

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C. Scribner, 1862 - 574 sider
 

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Side 78 - Denn dein ist das Reich und die Kraft und die Herrlichkeit in Ewigkeit. AMEN.
Side 561 - Dangerous it were for the feeble brain of man to wade far into the doings of the Most High; whom although to know be life, and joy to make mention of his name; yet our soundest knowledge is to know that, we know him not as indeed he is, neither can know him: and our safest eloquence concerning him is our silence, when we confess without confession that his glory is inexplicable, his greatness above our capacity and reach. He is above, and we upon earth; therefore it behoveth our words to be wary...
Side 1 - Origin and History of the English Language, and of the early literature it embodies. By the Hon. George P. Marsh, US Minister at Turin, Author of " Lectures on the English Language.
Side 98 - ... once has heard The cry for help, the tongue that all men speak, When want or woe or fear is in the throat, So that each word gasped out is like a shriek Pressed from the sore heart, or a strange wild note Sung by some fay or fiend. There is a strength Which dies if stretched too far or spun too fine, Which has more height than breadth, more depth than length. Let but this force of thought and speech be mine, And he that will may take the sleek, fat phrase, Which glows and burns not, though it...
Side 273 - I have often tymes passed and ryden the way, with gode companye of many lordes: God be thonked. And zee schulle undirstonde, that I have put this boke out of Latyn into Frensche, and translated it azen out of Frensche into Englyssche, that every man of my nacioun may undirstonde it.
Side 423 - in feith, it shal be don.'— And as he spak that word, al sodeinly This cok brak from his mouth deliverly, And heighe up-on a tree he fleigh anon. And whan the fox saugh that he was y-gon, 'Alias!' quod he, 'O Chauntecleer, alias! I have to yow...
Side 393 - Ful worthy was he in his lordes werre, And therto hadde he riden, no man ferre, As wel in cristendom as in hethenesse, And evere honoured for his worthynesse. At Alisaundre he was whan it was wonne. Ful ofte tyme he hadde the bord bigonne...
Side 490 - For it is notoyrly knowen thorugh the unyversal world that there been nine worthy and the best that ever were, that is to wete, thre Paynyms, thre Jewes, and thre Crysten men. As for the Paynyms, they were tofore the Incarnacyon of Cryst, whiche were named, the fyrst Hector of Troye, of...
Side 491 - And in dyvers places of Englond many remembraunces ben yet of hym and shall remayne perpetuelly, and also of his knyghtes : fyrst, in the abbey of Westmestre, at Saynt Edwardes shryne, remayneth the prynte of his seal in reed waxe, closed in beryll, in whych is...
Side 71 - Pro Deo amur et pro Christian poblo et nostro commun salvament, d'ist di in avant, in quant Deus savir et podir me dunat, si salvarai eo cist meon fradre Karlo et in...

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