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only was planted, and this engrafted with the different sorts required, I have no doubt but the crops would be much larger and more certain and regular.

Mr. Speechly describes the method of engrafting Vines as being successfully practised, and recommends the Syrian grape, which is of very large and luxuriant growth, as the best adapted for a stock to bear several sorts.

The Vine may be engrafted in the same manner as other trees, but engrafting by approach is the most certain method; the season for engrafting is the same as with trees generally, viz. a short time before the buds begin to swell. It is found, that the best time to graft is, when the

young

shoots of the stock have grown from six to nine inches; the sap is then not lost by bleeding.

Hitt describes his plate 5. as follows:
The figures in this plate exhibit Vines of dif-

ferent ages.

“Figure 1. represents a layer when first taken from the mother plant.

· Figure 2. the same when cut in the customary way.

“Figure 3. when planted and cut according to the method I practise, having one branch taken off, and the other shortened.

“ Figure 4. is the same with two shoots, raised from the two buds left on, when under the representation of figure 3.

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“Figure 5. represents the same Vine cut and nailed in the winter.

“ Figure 6. is the Vine cut and nailed in the winter, by the common method.

“ Figure 7. is one full grown with one of its sides cut and nailed in the winter, and the other remaining as it was nailed in the summer.

“ Figure 8. is a long branch supposed to be made last year, and turned in winter to cover a bare part of the wall.

Figure 9. is called the sow-gelder's horn, and is a method made use of by some of the best pruners to dispose of long branches."

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The explanation of his plate 6. and pruning of a Fig Tree against a wall.

“ This plate shows the shapes of a Fig Tree of different ages. Figure 1. is either a tree just planted with three branches left on, or one that has been planted a year with three buds or more upon it, which has produced shoots.

Figure 2. is a tree a year older than the first, brought to the shape it appears in, by displacing all other buds but those which produce the shoots.

Figure 3. is a tree almost full grown, though it had the same shapes as the other two figures, when it was young, and the horizontal parts A. B. and A. C. were like A. and B. in figure 1.; but had they been laid horizontally when so short, they would not have reached near enough the outsides of the space designed for the whole tree, and as they would increase but slowly in length after, part of the wall would have continued a long time bare.

“ As the roots of a Fig Tree are like those of vines, so must they be planted in the same way, though pruned differently.

“ If the young shoots of a Fig Tree are not too near each other, they will produce almost as much fruit as leaves, both from the same places, but not all of them at the same time; for the leaves drop off the trees, when the fruit near the upper ends of the branches are only like small buds. And there are many others appear the next spring from leaves, where leaves were shed from in the autumn, that

for training, and bearing in mind that it grows wide and luxuriant.

The Fig Tree when it has attained a surface of branches proportioned to the soil it occupies, produces its fruit at almost every bud which furnishes a leaf, but the fruit on the spring shoots is always the largest and finest; the figs however which grow on the Midsummer shoots, when they can be preserved during the winter, will become of a very delicious flavour, although small in size, and these will also ripen long before those on the spring shoots.

Unlike the vine, the Fig Tree throws its strongest branches from the most vertical, buds; but, notwithstanding, it always pushes out shoots from the point buds of horizontal branches, and although these are short, the buds are close together, and generally very fruitful.

The farther the bearers are from the root, the more certainly productive they are. I therefore prefer training them in the manner of the morello cherry-tree, which also throws its shoots from the point buds, and produces fruit on the last year's shoots, in the manner represented by figure A. B. plate 6.; but it will be necessary to keep the bearers at the full distance of the length of a leaf, that they may not overshadow the fruit too much, which will prevent its ripening.

Hitt says, “ Fig Trees (as I have experienced) prosper and bear best when planted in a dry soil, with a rock near the surface."

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The explanation of his plate 6. and pruning of a Fig Tree against a wall.

“ This plate shows the shapes of a Fig Tree of different ages. Figure 1. is either a tree just planted with three branches left on, or one that has been planted a year with three buds or more upon it, which has produced shoots.

Figure 2. is a tree a year older than the first, brought to the shape it appears in, by displacing all other buds but those which produce the shoots.

Figure 3. is a tree almost full grown, though it had the same shapes as the other two figures, when it was young, and the horizontal parts A. B. and A. C. were like A. and B. in figure 1.; but had they been laid horizontally when so short, they would not have reached near enough the outsides of the space designed for the whole tree, and as they would increase but slowly in length after, part of the wall would have continued a long time bare.

As the roots of a Fig Tree are like those of vines, so must they be planted in the same way, though pruned differently.

“ If the young shoots of a Fig Tree are not too near each other, they will produce almost as much fruit as leaves, both from the same places, but not all of them at the same time; for the leaves drop off the trees, when the fruit near the upper ends of the branches are only like small buds. And there are many others appear the next spring from leaves, where leaves were shed from in the autumn, that

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