The Metallurgy of Lead: Including Desilverisartion and Cupellation

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J.Murray, 1870 - 567 sider
 

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Side 176 - The bellows are burned, the lead is consumed of the fire; the founder melteth in vain : for the wicked are not plucked away. Reprobate silver shall men call them, because the Lord hath rejected them.
Side 19 - Gennesareth, &c. A Canoe Cruise in Palestine and Egypt, and the Waters of Damascus.
Side 5 - BIGG-WITHER (TP). Pioneering in South Brazil; Three Years of Forest and Prairie Life in the Province of Parana.
Side 18 - LIVINGSTONE'S LAST JOURNALS. The Last Journals of David Livingstone in Central Africa, from 1865 to his Death. Continued by a Narrative of his Last Moments and Sufferings, obtained from his Faithful Servants Chuma and Susi.
Side 123 - ... cooled below its point of fusion, by which the metal is obtained in a state of minute subdivision. In doing this, he was struck with the circumstance, that, as the lead cooled down to nearly its fusing point, little particles of solid lead made their appearance, like small crystals, among the liquid...
Side 124 - After observing this phenomenon once or twice, he began to conceive that possibly some difference might be found in the proportions of silver held by the part that crystallized, and the part that remained liquid. Accordingly, he divided a small quantity of lead into two portions, by melting it in a crucible...
Side 126 - ... in some measure retained by shutting the ash-pit door. Above the centre of this line of pots, at the height of six or eight feet, it is convenient to have a small iron railway, with a frame or carriage on four wheels to move backwards and forwards the whole length of the range of pots, from which is to depend a chain, terminated by a hook at the bottom, and reaching to nearly the top of the pots. This is for the purpose of more easily conveying the ladles filled with crystals from pot to pot.
Side 5 - The Cathedral: its Necessary Place in the Life and Work of the Church.
Side 213 - The use of crucibles (/dai-oi), bellows, cavities of some peculiar sort (X&UIM), perhaps chimneys, great variety of carbonaceous fuel, the power of purifying and alloying, and knowledge of the properties of alloys, appear quite conspicuous among the ancient arts. The inscriptions* on these masses of lead are in the same general form as the ' marks' of the different mines now in work, and which, no doubt, are their literal and lineal descendants.
Side 124 - ... phenomenon once or twice, he began to conceive, that possibly some difference might be found in the proportions of silver, held by the part that crystallized, and the part that remained liquid. Accordingly, he divided a small quantity of lead into two portions, by melting it in a crucible, and allowing it to cool very slowly with constant stirring, until a considerable quantity crystallized, as already mentioned, from which the remainder, while still fluid, was poured off. An equal weight of...

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