Sidebilder
PDF
ePub

THE

HISTORY OF EUROPE,

1809.

VOL. II. PART 1.

b

LIST of the CABINET MINISTERS and CHỊEF OFFICERS

of the Crown, 1809.

Earl CAMDEN,

President of the Council.
Lord Eldon,

Lord High Chancellor.
Earl WESTMORELAND, Lord Privy Seal.
Duke of PORTLAND,

First Lord of the Treasury.
Lord MULGRAVE........... First Lord of the Admiralty.
Earl ChaTHAM, .............. Master-General of the Ordnance.
Lord HAWKESBURY, Secretary of State for the Home Department.
Mr CANNING, .............. Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs.
Lord CASTLEREAGH, Secretary of State for War and Colonies.
Mr PERCEVAL, ...... Chancellor, and Treasurer of the Exchequer.

Mr R. DUNDAS,...

.............. President of the Board of Controul. Earl BATHURST,

President of the Board of Trade.
Mr Rose, ....

Treasurer of the Navy.
Lord C. SOMERSET....... | Joint Paymasters.
Mr LONG,

S
Earl of SANDWICH,

Postmasters General.

Earl of SANCHESTER }
Mr HUSK 18SON estey;}

} Joint Secretaries of the Treasury.

Mr Huskisson,
Hon. Mr WELLESLEY,
Sir William Grant....... Master of the Rolls.
Sir VICARY GIBBS, ........ Attorney-General.
Mr PLUMER, ......

Solicitor-General.

HISTORY OF EUROPE,

1809.

CHAP. I.

Meeting of Parliament. Debates on the King's Speech, and on the Overtures

from Erfurth. PARLIAMENT met before

so long as the people of Spain should Jan. 19. the issue of Sir John Moore's remain true to themselves, so long

campaign was known; but would he continue to them his most it was known that his army was ra- strenuous assistance and support. He pidly retreating, or rather flying to- had renewed to them, in the moment ward the coast, and intelligence was of their difficulties and reverses, the hourly expected, with more of anxiety engagements which he had voluntarithan of hope. The king's speech ly contracted at the outset of their was in a tone suited to the times. struggle against the usurpation and He had given orders, he said, that tyranny of France : those engagecopies of the proposals for opening a ments had been reduced into the form negociation, which had been trans- of a treaty of alliance, which, as soon mitted from Erfurth, and of the cor- as the ratifications were exchanged, respondence which thereupon took should be laid before parliament. place, should be laid before both Concerning Portugal, he said, that houses ; and he was persuaded that while he contemplated with the livethey would participate in the feelings liest satisfaction the atchievements of which he had expressed, when it was his forces in the commencement of the required that he should consent to campaign, and the deliverance of the commence the negociation by aban- kingdom of his ally, he most deeply doning the cause of Spain. He con- regretted the termination of that camtinued to receive from the Spanish paign, by an armistice and convengovernment the strongest assurances tion, of some of the articles of which of their determined perseverance in he had felt himself obliged formally the cause of their lawful monarchy, to declare his disapprobation. He ad their national independence ; and relied on the disposition of parliament VOL. II. PART 1.

A

« ForrigeFortsett »