Works, Volumer 2-3

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J. Wiley & sons, 1887
 

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And connected analogies 9 How the dignity of treatment is proportioned to the expres sion of infinity
9
Examples among the Southern schools
10
Among the Venetians
11
Among the painters of landscape
12
Other modes in which the power of infinity is felt
13
The beauty of curvature
14
How constant in external nature
15
The beauty of gradation
16
vuuu sauuT0 17 How found in nature 18 How necessary in
18
Of Accuracy and Inaccuracy in Impressions
19
Of Unity or the Type of the Divine Compre hensiveness
50
Of Symmetry or the Type of Divine Justice
72
Of Moderation or the Type of Government
81
Secondly as Generic animal
101
The beauty of fulfilment of appointed function in every tion of the imagination
103
This last sense how inaccurate yet to be retained 103 4 This last sense how inaccurate yet to be retained 5 Of Ideal form First in the lower animals Š ...
104
Ideal form in vegetables
105
The difference of position between plants and animals 9 Admits of variety in the ideal of the former 10 Ideal form in vegetables destroyed by cultiv...
108
The ideality of
109
Thirdly in Man 1 Condition of the human creature entirely different from that of the lower animals
111
How the conception of the bodily ideal is reached 4 Modifications of the bodily ideal owing to influence of mind First of intellect
113
What beauty is bestowed by them
115
Ideal form to be reached only by love
121
Expressions chiefly destructive of ideal character 1st Pride
122
Portraiture ancient and modern
123
And prevented by its splendor
124
Or by severity of drawing
125
And modern art 27 Thirdly ferocity and fear The latter how to be distin guished from awe
126
Holy fear how distinct from human terror
127
Ferocity is joined always with fear Its unpardonableness 30 Such expressions how sought by painters powerless and
129
It is never to be for itself exhibitedat least on the face
130
Recapitulation
131
The inconsistency among the effects of the mental virtues on the form 116
133
PAGE
137
Miltons and Dantes description of flame
163
The imagination seizes always by the innermost point
164
It acts intuitively and without reasoning
165
Absence of imagination how shown
166
Distinction between imagination and fancy 8 Fancy how involved with imagination
168
Fancy is never serious
169
Various works in the Scuola di San Rocco 23 The Last Judgment How treated by various painters g 24 By Tintoret
182
The imaginative verity how distinguished from realism 26 The imagination how manifested in sculpture 27 Bandinelli Canova Mino da Fiesole
184
Recapitulation The perfect function of the imagination is the intuitive perception of ultimate truth
188
Of Imagination Contemplative 1 Imagination contemplative is not part of the essence but only a habit or mode of the faculty 2 The ambiguity of co...
192
Is not in itself capable of adding to the charm of fair things
193
But gives to the imagination its regardant power over them
194
The third office of fancy distinguished from imagination con templative
195
Various instances
197
Morbid or nervous fancy
200
The action of contemplative imagination is not to be expressed by art
201
Of the Superhuman Ideal
212
By what test is the health of the perceptive faculty to
1
The glory of all things is their Unity
2
The several kinds of unity Subjectional Original Of sequence and of membership
3
Unity of membership How secured
4
Variety Why required
5
Change and its influence on beauty
6
The love of change How morbid and evil 8 The conducing of variety towards unity of subjection
8
And towards unity of sequence
9
The nature of proportion 1st of apparent proportion
10
The value of apparent proportion in curvature
11
How by nature obtained
12
Apparent proportion in melodies of line
13
Error of Burke in this matter
14
Constructive proportion Its influence in plants
15
With what liabilities to error
16
Summary
17
Of the Real Nature of Greatness of Style
23
Of False Opinions held concerning Beauty
30
Universal feeling respecting the necessity of repose in art Its sources 65
65
First Purist
70
Of Vital Beauty First as Relative
89
form without color 201
99
anxieties overwrought and criminal 139
139
Evil consequences of such coldness 140
140
Of the Pathetic Fallacy
152
ADDENDA
225
Of Modern Landscape
248
The dignity of its function
308
APPENDIX
333

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Populære avsnitt

Side 168 - Dis's waggon! daffodils That come before the swallow dares, and take The winds of March with beauty; violets dim, But sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes Or Cytherea's breath; pale primroses, That die unmarried, ere they can behold Bright Phoebus in his strength...
Side 137 - And he took up his parable and said, Balaam the son of Beor hath said, and the man whose eyes are open hath said...
Side 91 - One lesson, shepherd, let us two divide, Taught both by what she shows, and what conceals • Never to blend our pleasure or our pride With sorrow of the meanest thing that feels.
Side 39 - From God who is our home. Heaven lies about us in our infancy. Shades of the prison-house begin to close Upon the growing boy; But he beholds the light and whence it flows, He sees it in his joy. The youth who daily farther from the East Must travel, still is Nature's priest, And, by the vision splendid, Is on his way attended. At length the man perceives it die away And fade into the light of common day.
Side 274 - Oh, what a tangled web we weave, When first we practise to deceive...
Side 280 - Fear and trembling Hope, Silence and Foresight ; Death the Skeleton And Time the Shadow ; — there to celebrate, As in a natural temple scattered o'er With altars undisturbed of mossy stone, United worship ; or in mute repose To lie, and listen to the mountain flood Murmuring from Glaramara's inmost caves, 1803.
Side 197 - Sweet flower ! for by that name at last, When all my reveries are past, I call thee, and to that cleave fast, Sweet silent creature ! That breath'st with me in sun and air, Do thou, as thou art wont, repair My heart with gladness, and a share Of thy meek nature ! TO THE SAME FLOWER.
Side 84 - That which doth assign unto each thing the kind, that which doth moderate the force and power, that which doth appoint the form and measure, of working, the same we term a law.
Side 167 - Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! my gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs? your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar?
Side 145 - On the dry smooth-shaven Green, To behold the wandering Moon, Riding near her highest noon, Like one that had been led astray Through the Heaven's wide pathless way; And oft, as if her head she bowed, Stooping through a fleecy cloud.

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