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APPENDIX IV

TABULATION OF BLIND POPULATION BY STATE EMPLOYMENT QUOTAS (1956)

Total Blind Population

Employable

Blind

Assumed level of nationwide employment of blind and State quotas needed to reach assumed national levels.

(a)

Present level of national employment of blind based on Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Report.

183

366

549

(1) 732

915

276

414

552

690

253

506

1,012

1,265

773

96

192

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384

480

962

1199

238

476

595

682

1,364

2,046

12,728

3,410

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United States

332,820

81,000

10,000

20,000(a)

30,000

40.000

50,000

Wisconsin

6,075

1,478

Iowa

4,593

1,118

(2) 130

(1)
(2)

Estimate of 725 employed blind is based on data from Wisconsin register,
Estimate of 125 employed blind is based on data obtained from Executive Secretary

of Iowa Commission for the Blind,

Alabama

8,408

2.046

Arizona

3,177

Arkansas

3,952

California

22,634

5,508

Colorado

3,376

Connecticut

3, 432

Dist. of Columbia

2.408

Florida

9,310

2,266

Georgia

9,649

2,348 United States

291

582

873

1,164

1,455 Total Blind Population

Employable

Blind

Assumed level of nationwide employment of blind and State quotas needed to reach_assumed national levels.

332,820

81,000

10,000

20,000

30,000

40,000

50,000

973

237

29

58

87

116

145

16,300

3,967

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908

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Idaho

Illin

Indiana

8,108

1,973

Kansas

3,729

Kentucky

6,679

1,625

Louisiana

8,044

1,958

Naine

Naryland

6,018

Massachusetts

7,946

1,934

lichigan

13, 428

3,268

Minnesota

5,070

1,234

.

Missouri

8,940

2,176

Montana

1,101

Nebraska

2,350

New Hampshire

1,050

256

32

64

96

128

160 Total Blind Population

Employable

Blind

Assumed level of nationwide employment of blind and State quotas needed to reach assumed national levels.

81,000

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667

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257

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1,123

134

278

417

556

695

631

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336

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293

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279

35

70

105

140

175

United States

332,820

New Jersey

9,098

2,214

New Nlexico

2,742

New York

27,586

6,714

North Carolina

10.885

2,649

North Dakota

1,054

Ohio

17,537

4,268

Oklahoma

4,616

Oregon

2,592

Pennsylvania

20,800

5,062

Rhode Island

1,380

South Carolina

7,193

1,751

South Dakota

1,204

Tennessee

7,998

1,946

Texas

20,362

4,955

Utah

1,148

Vermont

698

170

21

42

63

84

105

Total Blind
Population

Employable
Blind

United States

Assumed level of nationwide employment of blind and
State quotas needed to reach assumed national levels.

332,820

01.000

10,000

20,000

30,000

40.000

50,000

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1,340

131

l'est Virginia

262

393

4,476

524

1,089

655

135

Wyoming

270

405

538

540

131

675

16

32

48

64

80 CHAPTER II

SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC INTEGRATION OF THE BLIND

Introduction

The ultimate goal of organizations of the blind is the complete integration of the blind into society on a basis of equality. One step toward this goal is the placement of blind persons in competitive employment to the full extent of their abilities. But there are other steps that need to be taken, All the obstacles that stand in the path of attaining this goal must be removed or overcome. All possible aids to the attainment of this goal must be encouraged and expanded. In order that the role played by organizations of the blind in their struggle to achieve social and economic integration may be properly understood, it is necessary to know something of the causes that make it a struggle.

As in most social movements, there exist very different and often conflicting points of view. Three basic sets of attitudes may be described: (1) the attitudes of the public, (2) the attitudes of agencies for the blind, and (3) the attitudes of the blind themselves.

These designations should not be construed to mean that all members of the public are characterized by the first of these attitudes, that all agencies and workers for the blind are characterized by the second, or that all blind persons and organizations of the blind are characterized by the third. Many members of the public are not the victims of the attitudes described as "public;" many workers for the blind have not succumbed to the common attitudes of agencies; many blind individuals, and even some organizations of the blind, have not yet developed the forward-looking attitudes characteristic of the blind and their organizations.

Public attitudes towards the blind

In ancient times the attitude of the public towards the blind was one of almost universal and unmitigated hostility. The struggle of all mankind for survival was a stark affair with no quarter asked and no quarter given. Neither the family nor the community could afford to burden itself with the blind. Blindness was looked upon as one of the worst evils that could befall a man. Though certa in blind persons attained a sort of spiritual preeminence, inspiring

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