CHICAGO: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE

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Side 38 - Prospero : — And, like the baseless fabric of this vision, The cloud-capped towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself, Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve ; And, like this insubstantial pageant faded, Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff As dreams are made of, and our little life Is rounded with a sleep. !N"or
Side 60 - the desert a highway for our GOD ! Every valley shall be exalted, And every mountain and hill shall be made low ; '' And the crooked shall be made straight, ? And the glory of the LORD shall
Side 93 - Tarshish was thy merchant by reason of the multitude of all kinds of riches ; With silver, iron, tin, and lead, they traded in thy fairs. Javan, Tubai, and Meshech, they were thy merchants ; They traded the persons of men and vessels of brass in thy market. They of the house of Togarmah traded in thy fairs With horses and horsemen and mules. The
Side 93 - they were thy merchants ; They traded the persons of men and vessels of brass in thy market. They of the house of Togarmah traded in thy fairs With horses and horsemen and mules. The
Side 143 - The time is come when they are particularly called to take yet more generous views of their vocation, and to give commerce a universality as yet unknown. I refer to the juster principles which are gaining ground on the subject of free trade, and to the growing disposition of nations to promote it. Free trade !—this is the plain
Side 143 - civilization, we shall look back on our present restrictions as we do on the swaddlingbands by which, in darker times, the human body was compressed. The growing freedom of trade is another and glorious illustration of the tendency of our age to universality.
Side 135 - the year ; and a detour in the voyage of over 3,000 miles in a direct line to the markets of the world; — these considerations have been sufficiently powerful to divert the great flow of animal and vegetable food from the South to the East. Up to 1860, the West found a local market for an inconsiderable portion of her
Side 143 - far and wide, and to unite men in more friendly ties. Let them adopt maxims of trade which will establish general confidence. Especially in their intercourse with less cultivated ^tribes, let them feel themselves bound to be harbingers of
Side 263 - had been levied on the farmers of the central west, their proprietors could have paid it and been immensely the gainers. This proposition will become evident if we look at the modes in which railroads have been beneficial ; especially in the

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