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the meeting of Parliament will produce some further important measures; but what changes will take place in consequence, time must determine. The Superintending Committee of this Society do not feel it prudent, in the present state of affairs, to venture an opinion thus publicly, or to pre-judge the wisdom of the Legislature in this difficult business; well aware as they are that the clashing interests of the numerous population, together with the weight of duties and taxes necessary to defray the national expenditure, even in a time of comparative peace, must render the present period awful !

Subjoined to the aforementioned Parliamentary examination, are numerous tables and statements, respecting imports and exports of corn, flour, &c. to and from different countries, at different periods ; of which the most important to be inserted in this work, as affording curious information, is the following, viz.

An ACCOUNT of the Quantity of WHEAT and

WHEAT FLOUR Exported; and of FOREIGN WHEAT and WHEAT FLOUR Imported; in the following Years:

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Years. Quarters. Quarters. 1726 142,183 1727 30,315 1728 3,817 74,574 1729 18,993 40,315 1730 93,97176 1731 130,025 1732 1733 427,199 1734 498,196 6 1735 153,343 1736 118,170 16:09 1737 461,602 32 1738 580,596 1739 279,542 5,423 1740 54,390 1741

45,417 1742 293,260 1 1743 371,431

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ENGLAND.

Wheat and Flour Exported.

years.

Quarters. 1697 14,699 1698 6,857 1699 557 1700

49,056 1701

98,324 1702

90,230 1703 | 106,615 1704 90,313 1705 96,185 1706 188,332 1707 74,155 1708

83,406 1709 169,630 1710 13,924 1711 76,949 1712 ! 145,191 1713 176,227 1714 174,821 1715 | 166,490 1716 74,926 1717 22,954 1718 71,800 1719 127,762 1720 83,084 1721 81,633 1722 | 178,880 1723 157,720 1724 245,865 1725 | 204,413

2 1744 231,984 2 1745 324,839 6 1746 130,646 1747 266,907 1748 543,387 385 1749 629,049 382 1750 947,602 279 1751 661,416 3 1752 429,279 1753 299,609 754 | 356,270 201

1910 1911

148
12

An ACCOUNT of the Quantity of WHEAT and

WHEAT FLOUR Exported; and of FOREIGN WHEAT and WHEAT FLOUR Imported; in the following Years:

Foreign Wheat & Flour

Imported.

GREAT. BRITAIN

Foreign Wheat & Flour

Imported.

Wheat and Flour Exported.

Quarters.

5 141,562 20 162

3

Years. Quarters. Quarters. 1784 | 89,288 216,947 1785 132,685 110,863 1786 205,466 51,463 1787

120,536 59,339 1788 82,971 148,710 1789 140,014 112,656 1790 30,892 222,557 1791 | 70,626 469,056 1792 300,278 22,417 1793 76,869 490,398 1794 155,049 327,902 1795 18,839 313,793 1796 24.679 879.200 1797 54,525 461,767 1798 59,782

396,721 1799 39,362

463,185 1800 22,013 1,264,520 1801 28,406 1,424,766 1802 149,304 647,664 1 803 76,580 373,725 1904 63,073

641,140 1805 77.955 920,834 1806 29,566

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GREAT-
BRITAIN,

Wheat
and Flour
Exported.

Nars.

Quarters. 1755 237,466 1756 102,752 1757

11,545 1758

9 234 1759 227,641 1760 393,614

1761 441,956 . 1762 295,385

1763 429,538 1764 396,857 1765 107,126 1766 164,939 1767 5,071 1768 7,433 1769 49,892 1770 75,449 1771 10,089 1772

6,959 1773 7,037 1774 15,928 1775 91,037 1776 210,664 1777 87,686 1778 141,070 1779 222,261 1780 224,059 1781 103,021 1782 145,152 1783 51,9-13

56 72

1 104,547

11,020 497,905 349,268 4,378

34 2,510 25,474 56,857 289,149 560,988

20,578 233,323 106,394

5,039

3,915 159,866

80,695 584,183

310,342 1807 24,365

400,759 1808 77,567 81,466 1809 31,278 448,487 1810 75,785 1,530,691 1811

292,038 1812 46,325 246,376

97,765

ARTICLE XXIII.

[The following subject was introduced in a rather unusual

manner; but on account of its importance to planters, it gains a place in the present volume. If the appearance of the infect be equally alarming next summer, the Committee of Agriculture and Planting will be glad of information of the fact, but more so to hear of a remedy.)

To the Editor of the Bath Chronicle.

NY disastrous event respecting our Timber

Trees cannot fail to be noticed with national folicitude. A disease of a most inveterate and alarming nature, has lately attacked the Larch tree, in sundry situations, and it is very desirable to know whether it be general, or local. It has visited some of the largest as well as the smaller plants of that beautiful race, in the form of a whitilh insect re. sembling the American bug, which fome years ago began its destructive ravages on our apple-trees. But the modern enemy is vastly more multitudinous, insomuch that the largest larches are frequently found covered with this insect, like a hoar frost, throughout all their branches. We have heard of some plantations in which this kind of tree is universally visited by the enemy in question, and that the proprietors meditate a speedy and total removal of them from their woods. This may be too hasty a step; especially if it be found that the insect does Dot prey upon any other kind of plant. The Larch, in addition to its fingular beauty, has of late years been much reckoned on as the most valuable for timber, of all our varieties of firs. To lose it would be, therefore, a national misfortune. In the present state of the subject, those Gentlemen in the western counties, who have plantations, would confer a particular favour by sending accounts of their larches, directed to Mr. Ricards, at Hetling-house, Bath; also their opinion as to the origin of the disease ; how far the insect resembles any formerly known; and what the most probable means,

if

any there be, of its extirpation ?

WM. MATTHEWS. Hetling-House, July 11, 1814.

On the LARCH BLIGHT.

[Communicated by Letter to Mr. MATTHEWS.]

Innox Cottage, Frome, 30th Aug. 1814. MY GOOD FRIEND,

YOUR notice in the Bath Chronicle, July 11th, of the disorder lately observed to attack Larch Plantations, claims particular attention

VOL. XIII.

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