Annual Register, Volum 28

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Side 142 - On the whole it appears, and my argument shows, With a reasoning the court will never condemn, That the spectacles plainly were made for the Nose, And the Nose was as plainly intended for them.
Side 3 - Johnson's at once from meanness and from vanity. The mind of this man was indeed expanded beyond the common limits of human nature, and stored with such variety of knowledge, that I used to think it resembled a royal pleasure-ground...
Side 254 - Enemy aforementioned to neutral Places; but also from one Place belonging to an Enemy, to another Place belonging to an Enemy, whether they be under the Jurisdiction of the same Prince or under Several...
Side 257 - Soundings ; of two months from the Soundings to the city of Gibraltar; of ten weeks in- the Mediterranean Sea; and .of eight months in any...
Side 1 - ... immediately to produce that of the company, not merely from the notion that it was proper to laugh when he did, but purely out of want of power to forbear it. He was no enemy to splendour of apparel or pomp of equipage—" Life (he would say) is barren enough surely with all her trappings ; let us therefore be cautious how we strip her.
Side 2 - His manner of repeating deserves to be described, though, at the same time, it defeats all power of description; but whoever once heard him repeat an ode of Horace, would be long before they could endure to hear it repeated by another.
Side 1 - that the size of a man's understanding might always be justly measured by his mirth; " and his own was never contemptible. He would laugh at a stroke of genuine humour, or sudden sally of odd absurdity, as heartily and freely as I ever yet saw any man : and though the jest was often such as few felt besides himself, yet his laugh was irresistible...
Side 18 - Ireland, except those of the growth, produce, or manufacture of any of the countries beyond the Cape of Good Hope to the Straits of Magellan, should be imported into each kingdom from the other reciprocally under the same regulations, and at the same duties (if subject to duties) to which they would be...
Side 241 - If one of the contracting parties should be engaged in war with any other power, the free intercourse and commerce of the subjects or citizens of the party remaining neuter with the belligerent powers, shall not be interrupted. On the contrary, in that case as in full peace, the vessels of the neutral party may navigate freely to and from the ports and on the coasts of the belligerent parties, free vessels...
Side 139 - In stately sounds exalting high The reign of bounteous Ptolemy : Like the plenty-teeming tide Of his own Nile's redundant flood, O'er the cheer'd nations, far and wide...

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