Holidays with Hobgoblins: And Talk of Strange Things

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J.C. Hotten, 1861 - 332 sider
 

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Side 169 - The guarded gold : so eagerly the fiend O'er bog, or steep, through strait, rough, dense, or rare, With head, hands, wings, or feet, pursues his way, 950 And swims, or sinks, or wades, or creeps, or flies.
Side 91 - The third year (for this must be done thrice,) they are supposed to see the ghosts of all those who are to die the next year, pass by into the church. When any one sickens that is thought to have been seen in this manner, it is presently whispered about that he will not recover, for that such, or such an one, who has watched St. Mark's Eve, says so.
Side 331 - Unknown Poem, written by John Bunyan, whilst confined in Bedford Jail, for the support of his Family, entitled Profitable Meditations, Fitted to Man's Different Condition : In a Conference between Christ and a Sinner. By JOHN BUNYAN, Servant to the Lord Jesus Christ. Small 4to. half -morocco, very neat, price 7*. Gd. The few remaining copies now offered at 4s. Gd. ' A highly Interesting memorial of the great allegorist.'— ATHKNSDM.
Side 91 - Brand, that it was customary in that county for the common people to sit and watch in the church porch on St. Mark's Eve, from eleven o'clock at night till one in the morning. The third year (for this must be done thrice,) they are supposed to see the ghosts of all those who are to die the next year, pass by into the church.
Side 166 - Persons who have seen this bird assert that when the wings are spread they measure sixteen paces in extent, from point to point; and that the feathers are eight paces in length, and thick in proportion.
Side 202 - When hares kindle on cold hearth-stones, and lads shall marry ladies, and bring them home, then shall you have a year of pining hunger, and then a dearth without corn.
Side 286 - This crab runs very fast, and always endeavours to get into some hole or crevice on the approach of danger ; nor does it wholly depend on its art and swiftness, for while it retreats it keeps both claws expanded, ready to catch the offender if he should come within its reach, and if it succeeds on these occasions it commonly throws off the claw, which continues to squeeze with incredible force for...

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