Sidebilder
PDF
ePub

Reinette des Carmes :

Raised in the garden of Mr. Smith, near the city of Baltimore, in America, and brought into Liverpool by Captain George Hobson, of the Belvidere, of Baltimore, in 1817. One of its fruit fourteen inches and three quarters in circumference, and four inches in height, weighed one pound seven ounces and a half avoirdupoise.

118. BARCELONA PEARMAIN. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 747. Pom. Mag. t. 85.

Glace Rouge. Hort. Soc. Cat. No.365.

Kleiner Casseler Reinette. Hort. Soc. Cat. No.913., according to the Pom. Mag.

Speckled Golden Reinette. Hort. Soc. Cat. No.933., according to the Pom. Mag.

Reinette Rouge,
Reinette Rousse, of various collections.

Fruit middle-sized, oval, not angular, rather long, with a small shallow eye, the divisions of the calyx acute, erect. Stalk short, usually a little thickened on one side. Skin uneven, with numerous irregular russet spots ; on the sunny side of a deep warm red, on the other a brownish yellow. Flesh firm, inclining to yellowish, with a rich aromatic but slight agreeable acid.

A dessert apple from November till February.

This apple is of foreign origin, but has been for several years known in this country. It is a very good bearer, and deserves to be more extensively cultivated.

119. BAXTER'S PEARMAIN. G. Lind. in Hort. Trans. Vol. iv. p. 67. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 748.

Fruit pretty large, of a longish figure, nearly as broad at the crown as the base, having a few obtuse slight angles, extending the length of the fruit. Eye small, a little hollowed. Stalk half an inch long, rather stout. Skin a light green, a little coloured with faint red on the sunny side. Flesh firm. Juice saccharine, and well flavoured.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

growing in a garden occupied by Mrs. Sanctuary, at

A culinary apple from November till March.

This is a real Norfolk apple, in general cultivation throughout the county. It makes a large tree, is hardy, and a very good bearer.

120. BEDFORDSHIRE FOUNDLING. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 51.

Cambridge Pippin. Ib.

Fruit very large, three inches and a half deep, and three inches and a quarter in diameter, irregularly ribbed, with very broad obtuse angles on the sides, generally two or three of these are longer than others, which give the crown an oblique inclination. Eye not large, but open, rather deeply placed in a somewhat narrow basin. Stalk short, deeply inserted. Skin pale greenish yellow on the shaded side, sprinkled with a few green specks ; on the sunny side slightly tinged with pale orange, and sprinkled thinly with dull red specks. Flesh yellowish white, tender, mellow. Juice sub-acid and slightly saccharine. Core generally large and hollow.

A culinary apple from November to January.

121. BELLE BONNE. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. iv. p. 68. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 52.

Rolland, of some collections.

Fruit middle sized, about ten inches in circumference, somewhat conical; broad at the base, full in the middle, and narrow at the crown. Eye small, flat, closed by the segments of the calyx. Stalk half an inch long, slender, in some obliquely inserted under an elongated lip. Skin thick, pale, greenish yellow, brightened on the sunny side by a few reddish streaks, which become russetty at the base, and surround the stalk. Flesh firm, juicy, and well flavoured.

A valuable dessert and culinary apple from October till January

The only old tree I have ever seen of this sort is now

:

1

Catton, near Norwich, and was planted about fifty years ago. Ray, in 1668, has a summer and a winter Belle and Bonne ; but their identity cannot now be ascertained.

122. BENWELL'S PEARMAIN. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 749.

Fruit middle-sized, somewhat oblong, and narrowed at the crown. Eye small, surrounded by a few somewhat obscure plaits. Stalk half an inch long, rather deeply inserted.

Skin muddy green, with numerous brownish red dashes on the sunny side. Flesh crisp, yellowish white. Juice sub-acid, with a very pleasant aromatic flavour.

An excellent dessert apple from Michaelmas to Christmas.

The above name was given to this apple by Mr. Kirke, of Brompton, who received it a few years ago from Mr. Benwell, of Henley-upon-Thames, in Oxfordshire.

123. Bossom APPLE. Hort. Trans. Vol. iv. p. 528.

Fruit obtusely pyramidal. Eye placed in a shallow hollow, surrounded by several rather indistinct plaits. Stalk an inch long, deeply inserted. Skin pale greenish yellow, very much russetted ; and, in some specimens, with a bright red on the side exposed to the sun. Flesh dull white, inclining to yellow, fine in texture, crisp, with a sugared juice ; it bakes of a fine colour, and melts perfectly.

A large handsome culinary apple from November till March.

Specimens of this, from the Earl of Egremont's, at Petworth, were exhibited at the Horticultural Society, in 1820.

124. BREEDON PIPPIN. Hort. Trans. Vol. ii. t. 10. f. 1.

Fruit flatly conical, with an inclination to square, especially near the eye ; two inches and three quarters in the widest, and two inches and a quarter in its

p. 268.

narrowest diameter, a good deal flattened and irregular at the crown. Eye seated in a broad and shallow basin, surrounded by plaits and wrinkles variously formed ; at the base it is also flat, and broader than the crown. Stalk long, inserted in a regular and well hollowed cavity. Skin of a pale, rather dull yellow, tinged with reddish orange on the sunny side. . Flesh yellowish, firm, very sweet, with a rich vinous acid, a little spicy, and having a flavour something resembling a pine.

A dessert apple from November till after Christmas.

Raised by the Rev. Dr. Symonds Breedon, at Bere Court, in Berkshire.

125. CATSHEAD. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 147.
Cat's Head. Forsyth, Ed. 3. No. 21.
Costard. Ray, 1688.
Coustard, of the Norman Gardens.

Fruit large, long, nearly as broad at the crown as the base, having usually three obtuse angles on the upper, and two more acute, which are also shorter, on the under side. Eye large, open, and hollow. Stalk half an inch long, slender, rather deeply inserted. Skin very smooth, pale green, scarcely coloured on the sunny side. Flesh tender. Juice plentiful, sub-acid.

A culinary apple from October till January. 126. CHESTER PEARMAIN. Hort. Soc. Cat. No.751.

Fruit rather small, more long than broad, and tapering from the base to the crown. Eye very small, slightly depressed. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, slender. 'Skin pale yellow, with a little faint red on the sunny side. Flesh crisp, with a sugary perfumed juice.

A dessert apple from October to February. 127, CLAYGATE PEARMAIN. Hort. Trans. Vol. v.

P. 402.

Fruit a large and handsome Pearmain. Skin dull yellow, nearly covered with broad stripes of deep red. Flesh yellow, rather dry, like all apples of this class, but sweet and

very

rich.

F

A dessert apple from November till February.

The Claygate Pearmain may be considered as a valuable addition to our stock of table apples. It originated in a hedge-row in the hamlet of Claygate, near Thames Ditton ; and its fruit was first exhibited at the Horticultural Society, by John Braddick, Esq., December 17, 1821.

128. COCKLE PIPPIN. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 169. Pom. Mag. t. 136.

Nutmeg Cockle Pippin. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 169.

Nutmeg Pippin, of various Collections, according to the Pom. Mag.

White Cockle. 16.

Fruit middle-sized, oblong, tapering a little from the base to the crown, very slightly angular on the sides, about two inches and a half long, and two inches and a quarter in diameter. Eye narrow, with a closed slender calyx, rather shallow, surrounded by narrow plaits. Stalk half an inch long, slender, one half of which is sunk in a narrow funnel-shaped cavity. Skin pale green, becoming bright yellow, with a few grey specks, and partly covered, especially near the base, with a pretty thick light brown russet. Flesh yellowish, firm, and tender. Juice saccharine, mixed with acid, and a slight pleasant perfume.

A dessert apple, and also excellent for culinary purposes from November till May.

129. COLONEL HARBORD's PIPPIN. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. iv. p. 65.

Fruit rather large, inclining to a conical shape, about eleven inches in circumference each way, angular on the sides. Eye large, in a rather shallow basin, surrounded by bold plaits or wrinkles. Stalk half an inch long. Skin pale yellowish green, partially russetted on one side. Flesh white mixed with green, soft, very juicy, with a pleasant brisk astringency.

« ForrigeFortsett »