The History of Painting in Italy: The school of Venice

Forside
W. Simpkin and R. Marshall, 1828
 

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Utvalgte sider

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 322 - Io mi son un che, quando Amore spira, noto, ed a quel modo Che detta dentro, vo significando. O frate, issa vegg...
Side 42 - Domenico Veneziano, who is known to have availed himself of it for many years, both in Venice and elsewhere. During that period Antonello visited other places, and more especially Milan, whence he returned to Venice for the second time, and, as it is said,
Side 367 - Veronese; the attitudes are more than usually natural, prompt, and varied, and the composition appears to have been managed with truth and with good sense. Although rapid in the handling, he did not abuse his celerity of hand, as so many artists have been known to do. His figures are accurately designed, and appear starting from the canvass, most frequently coloured with a very beautiful azure, in which they shine conspicuous over all. Such pieces as he conducted in fresco, still preserve the native...
Side 359 - ... in wax, and by this means he was enabled to draw with considerable judgment and exact precision, the several parts that are comprehended in the shadowing ; owing to which art, his designs were eagerly sought after, and his works repeatedly engraved by Pitteri, by Pelli, and by Monaco, besides other prints that were executed in Germany and elsewhere. His method of coloring, however, diminished in a great measure the chief merit of his pictures. His shades have increased and changed...
Side 28 - Jacometto de Flor." A much nobler work is a Coronation of the Virgin, in the cathedral of Ceneda, extremely rich in figures, insomuch as to have deserved the name of the " Painting of Paradise,
Side 132 - ... pictures embellished with fine portraits, with which he ornamented the castle of the city ; and still more so for several of his altar-pieces. Of these there is one at San Giorgio, representing the Redeemer, suffering under the cross, between various figures of cherubs, holding other instruments of his passion ; a piece that displays all the excellent maxims derived from his education. This artist may be pronounced the last of the great school, whose productions do credit to a good collection....
Side 203 - One of the second kind may be seen in the Medicean Museum, a picture which represents an academy of music. By this method he seemed to confess the poverty of his imagination, though he derived from it a very remarkable advantage. By dint of continually repeating the same things, he brought them to the utmost point of perfection of which they were susceptible ; as we may gather from his picture of the Nativity of our Lord, placed at San Giuseppe, in Bassano, the master-piece not only of Jacopo, but...
Side 187 - I may, without fear of temerity, observe, that it is impossible to produce any thing more perfectly graceful and pleasing, more beautiful in point of colouring, among works in fresco." (Trat. p. 598.) We next arrive at the name of Jacopo Robusti, the son of a Venetian dyer, and for this reason surnamed Tintoretto. He was pupil to Titian, who, jealous of his talents, soon banished him from his studio. He did not aspire, like the preceding artists, to the name of Titian's follower ; for he burned with...

Bibliografisk informasjon