Asiatick Researches: Or, Transactions of the Society Instituted in Bengal, for Inquiring Into the History and Antiquities, the Arts, Sciences, and Literature, of Asia, Volum 10

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Vol. 2-3, 5-12 have lists of the members of the society.
 

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Side 202 - when a man becomes infirm and weary of the " world, he is said to invite his own children to " eat him in the season when salt and limes " are cheapest. He then ascends a tree, round " which his friends and offspring assemble, and " as they shake the tree, join in a funeral " dirge, the import of which is, ' The season " is come, the fruit is ripe, and it must de" scend.' The victim descends, and those that " are nearest and dearest to him deprive him " of life and devour his remains in a solemn...
Side 166 - This consideration alone," adds that able author, " is sufficient to give it claim to the highest degree of antiquity, and to originality, so far as that term can be applied. The various dialects of this speech, though they have a wonderful accordance in many essential properties, have experienced those changes which separation, time, and accident produce ; and, in respect to the purposes of intercourse, may be classed into several languages...
Side 180 - Such historical narratives are extremely numerous ; indeed there is reason to believe that there is one of every State or tribe ; and though occasionally embellished by fiction, it is only from them that we can obtain an outline of the Malay history, and of the progress of the nation. The juridical customs or traditions of the Malays have likewise been collected into codes of different antiquity and authority. Among those of the greatest authority are the " Undang Undang," and the
Side 176 - Pantiins the Malays often recite, in alternate contest, for several hours ; the preceding Pantun always furnishing the catch-word to that which follows, until one of the parties be silenced or vanquished, or, as the Malays express it, be dead (suda matt).
Side 410 - ... able to remove at once the sins of man. An imperceptible something within it, the wise ever demonstrate to exist by proofs difficultly apprehended. But BRAHMA alone thoroughly knows this vast and inaccessible mountain, as he alone knows the supreme soul. With its lakes overspread by the bloom of lotus, and overshadowed by arbours of creeping plants whose foliage and blossoms are enchanting, the pleasing scenery subdues the hearts of women who maintained their steadiness of mind even in the company...
Side 544 - The battle lasted two hours; and for two hours and a half more were our conquering soldiers engaged in pursuit. When one hour of the day remained, the field was entirely cleared of the enemy; and as the entrenchments of their camp were strong, and the fortifications formidable, we would not permit our army to assault it. " An immense treasure, a number of elephants, part of the artillery of the emperor, and rich spoils of every description, were the reward of our victory.
Side 118 - He adds alfo, according to CLEMENS of Alexandria, that the Hindus and the Jews were the only people who had a true idea of the creation of the world, and the beginning of things.
Side 490 - Kazi be a person capable of disquisition (Ijtihad), he may consider in his own mind, what is consonant to the principles of right and justice, and applying the result with a pure intention to the facts and circumstances of the case, let him pass judgment accordingly.
Side 544 - AN immense treasure, a number of grand elephants, the artillery of the emperor, and great spoils of every description, were the reward of our victory." Upwards of twenty thousand of the enemy were slain on the field of battle, and a much greater number were made prisoners. IMMEDIATELY after...
Side 123 - Though not an object of worship among Buddhists, the cross is a favourite emblem and device among them. It is exactly the cross of the Manicheans, with leaves and flowers springing from it. This cross, putting forth leaves and flowers (and fruit also, as I am told), is called the divine tree, the tree of the gods, the tree of life and knowledge, and productive of whatever is good and desirable, and is placed in the terrestrial paradise (Col.

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