Lives of Lord Castlereagh and Sir Charles Stewart, the Second and Third Marquesses of Londonderry: With Annals of Contemporary Events in which They Bore a Part ...

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W. Blackwood and Sons, 1861

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Small regular forces of the Government
39
Savage conduct of the Irish militia and volunteers
41
Treaty between the Irish rebels and the French Government
43
Renewed attempt of the French in 1797 and battle of Camperdown
44
First rising of the rebels in 1797
46
Violent designs and proceedings of the rebels
47
Arrest of the Executive Committee
48
Lord Edward Fitzgeralds arrest and death
49
Death of Lord Edward Fitzgerald and Captain Ryan
50
Breaking out of the rebellion
52
Reinforcements from England and successes of the royal forces
54
Battle of Vinegar Hill
55
Lord Castlereaghs humane injunctions to General Lake in regard to the rebels
56
Earl Camden iB succeeded by Lord Cornwallis
58
4951 Lord Cornwalls picture of the state of Ireland at this period 5961
59
Amnesty proposed by Lord Cornwallis and Lord Castlereagh
62
Violence and passions of the extreme Protestant party in Dublin
63
Efforts of Lords Cornwallis and Castlereagh on the side of mercy
64
Landing of the French in Killala Bay
65
The mmpart is breached from a distance
66
Defeat of the British at Castlebar
67
Surrender of the iuvaders to Lord Cornwallis
68
Good effects of this abortive invasion
69
Aspect of the trenches before the assault
70
The assault of the place
71
Results of the rebellion
72
Renewed dangers of French invasion
73
Both armies are placed in cantonments
74
Views of Lord Cornwallis and Lord Castlereagh on the Irish Govern ment
75
C2 Mr Pitts projects for pacifying Ireland
76
Appointment of Lord Castlereagh as Secretary for Ireland in lieu of Mr Pelham
78
Resume of Lord Castlereaghs achievements at the War Office 313
79
Great difficulties of the duties with which he was charged
80
Adaptation of Lord Castlereaghs character for the task
81
Opposition to it in Dublin
82
Mr Pitts views on the Union and Catholic emancipation
83
6971 Articles of the proposed Union and Lord Castlereaghs views regard ing it 8587
85
Importance of this memoir
88
First movement towards the Union
90
Rapid progress of the resistance to the Union
91
Views of the Catholics on the question
92
Memoir by Lord Castlereagh on the subject
93
Views of Government and Lord Castlereagh on Catholic emancipation
95
in bringing forward the measure
98
The Union is passed in the British House
99
The Union is rejected by the Irish Parliament
100
Effect of this defeat on Mr Pitt Lord Cornwallis and Lord Castle reagh
101
The English Government resolves to persevere
103
He continues to assist the determination of Government on the subject
105
Efforts of the Opposition during the recess
107
Disturbed and alarming Btate of the island
108
Military force in Ireland at this time
110
Increasing difficulties with the militia and yeomanry
112
Naval preparations of the French for the invasion of Ireland
113
Changes in the project of Union at the instance of Lord Castlereagh
115
The measure is carried in the Irish House
116
Treasonable efforts of the Opposition and dismissal of Lord Down shire
117
Fresh difficulties in the way
118
Increasing difficulties attending the measure which is at length passed
120
Its reception in Parliament and the country
122
Difficulties on the part of Government in the creation of peerages
123
Its settlement by concession of Ministers
126
Difficulty in regard to the Catholic claims
127
Increased difficulties attending the Catholic question
128
Difficulties of the King and Cabinet on the subject
130
Mr Pitts views on the occasion
132
Illness of the King which precludes all further discussion of the Catho lic claims at this time
134
Lord Hardwicke the new LordLieutenant
135
Beneficial effects of the Union
137
Lord Hardwicke succeeds Lord Cornwallis in Dublin and Lord Castle reagh remains in London
138
Obloquy to which Lord Castlereagh was exposed from the magnitude of his public services
139
CHAPTER II
141
24 His measures in Parliament regarding Ireland 142143
142
Woeful picture of Ireland by the Earl of Clare
145
for War
212
Treaties in consequence concluded with the Allied powers
213
But the succour is promised too late to save from Friedland and Tilsit
214
The secret articles of Tilsit become known to the British Ministry
216
Copenhagen expedition and capture of the Danish fleot
218
Great impression produced by this stroke in Europe
219
Arguments of Opposition againBt the expedition
220
810 Lord Castlereaghs answer 221223
221
Vindication of the Copenhagen expedition furnished by Napoleon to his historians
225
Judicious placing of the British army after Copenhagen in Sweden
226
Lord Castlereaghs plan of an attack on South America
227
His plan for detaching it from the Spanish Crown
228
His early conferences regarding it with Sir A Wellesley
229
Lord Castlereaghs plans in regard to South America
230
The success of the Copenhagen expedition hastens Junots march to Lisbon
232
The Prince Regent of Portugal and fleet sail for Brazil
233
Great naval force at the disposal of Napoleon
234
State of the land forces
236
Lord Castlereaghs system for supplying the army with troops and the defence of the country
238
Advantages of the ballot for the local militia
239
True principles on the subject for Great Britain
240
Great success of Lord Castlereaghs measures for recruiting the army
242
Breakingout of the Spanish war
243
27 Lord Castlereaghs disposition of the land force and transports of Great Britain for active operations
244
His projected operation against Boulogne
245
Portugal is selected as the battlefield by Lord Castlereagh
247
Choice of a Commanderinchief
249
Landing of the expedition and battle of Vimeira
251
Convention of Cintra which in the circumstances was expedient
253
Advance of Sir John Moore into Spain
255
Great effects of Sir J Moores advance against Soult
256
Lord Castlereagh disapproves of the abandonment of Spain by the British army
257
Lord Caatlereaghs instructions to Moore and Baird for the disposal of the army which retreated to Corunna
259
Lord Castlereagh resolves to persevere in the Peninsular contest
260
Ease with which Antwerp might have been taken at first and even after
303
Intrigue in the Cabinet to overturn Lord Castlereagh
309
advance of the age
316
CHAPTER IV
318
His services in 1799 in Holland 818
319
First operations in Portugal 820
321
Gallant actions near Sahagun and retreat of the army towards Galicia
322
Disastrous march to Corunna
324
Horrors of the retreat
325
Battle offered at Lugo and march to Corunna
326
Arrival of the army at Corunna
327
Preparation for the battle of Corunna
328
Battle of Corunna
329
292
330
State of affairs when he landed in Portugal
331
Advance to the Douro
332
Soulfs incipient revolt against Napoleon
333
Advance of Sir A Wellesley to the Douro
334
Passage of tho Douro
335
Pursuit of the French out of Portugal
336
Operations in Spain are determined on with Cuesta
337
Plan of operations
338
Interview with Cuesta and appearance of the Spanish army
339
Advance to Talavera and preparations for a battle there
340
The French forces unite and again approach Talavera
341
Position of tho troops at Talavera
343
SO Battle of Talavera
344
Desperate attack of the French on the centre and right
345
Victory of the British
346
Picturesque anecdotes during the battle
347
Position of the British army after the battle
348
Sir Arthur retreats by the bridge of Arzobispo to the south of
350
General Stewarts answer
359
He is made a Knight of the Bath
363
CHAPTER VIII
363
Desponding feelings in the army
364
Gloomy aspect of affairs in the British army
372
Defeat of the attack on the British left
378
Weak points of the line
385
Wellingtons foresight of Hassenas designs
389
Movements of Wellington on the retreat of the French
391
330
392
Wretched condition of the French army
393
Wellingtons difficulties
395
Napoleons plan for a fresh invasion of Portugal
397
State of the French army when it reentered Spain
409
Material losses of the French army during the campaign
410
CHAPTER VI
412
Wellingtons movements to regain Badajos
413
Wellington undertakes the siege of Badajos
414
Position of the troops covering the blockade of Almeida
415
Description of Fuentes dOnore
417
Necessity of relieving Almeida and Badajos
418
Attack of Massena on Fuentes dOnore
419
Arrival of the Imperial Guard and renewal of the battle
421
Preparations for battle on the 5th by Wellington
422
Desperate conflict in Fuentes dOnore
424
Massena retreats without a further attack
425
Lord Londonderrys reflections on this battle
426
This was a turningpoint in Sir Charles Stewarts fortunes
427
Maaseuas orders to Brennier to evacuate Almeida
428
Blowing up of Almeida and escape of Brenuier
429
Wellington despatches troops nnd stores for Etremadura
431
Operations for the first siege of Badajos
432
Progress of the siege which is suspended
433
Forces on both sides
434
Description of the field of battle
435
Battle of Albuera
436
Gallant attack of Stewarts division
437
Gallant advance of Houghtons brigade
438
Glorious charge of the Fusilier brigade under Cole which regains the day
439
Victory of the British
440
Results of the buttle on both sides
441
Soult retires to Llerona and Beresford resumes the siege of Badajos
442
Siegetrain of Wellington and stores
443
Description of Badajos
444
Fort St Christoval
445
Repulse of the storm of Fort St Christoval
446
A second assault on Fort Christoval is resolved on
447
Ruisiug of the siege and forces on both 6ides
448
Improved situation of Wellington
449
The French generals decline the conflict
450
Habits of the orniy when in these cantonments
451
Movement of the army to new cantonments on the Tagus its reinforce ment and plan of operations
452
Ciudad Rodrigo is rovictualled and Wellington establishes a distant blockade
453
Wellingtons preparations and advance of the enemy who relieve Ciudad Rodrigo
455
Appronch to El Bodon
456
Glorious cavalry action under Alteu and Sir Charles Stewart
457
Retreat of tho British to Guinaldo and their dangerous position
458
Splendid appearance of the French army here collected
459
Munnont declines battle
460
Rotreat of tho British and its reasons
461
Tho French decline the conflict
462
Tho French go into winter quarters
463
Wellingtons projects at this time
464
69 Wellington approaches Ciudad Rodrigo
466
Investment of Ciudad Rodrigo and its difficulties
467
433
469
470
470
472
472
Situation of Germany and treaties with Prussia at this period by Great
480
CHAPTER VII
482
Regency question
483
35 Lord Costlereaghs speech in support of the restrictions 484486
484
Ferment in the country against the Peninsular war
487
711 Lord Costlereaghs speech on the Spanish war of 1809 488493
488
Growing despondence on the Peninsular war in the country
494
Grounds of Lord Castlereagh and Wellingtons confidence in the war in the Peninsula
495
Immense difficulty of getting specie for the British army
497
Appointment of the Bullion Committee
498
Bullion Report
499
Mr Vansittarts counterresolutions
500
1829 Lord Castlereaghs argument against the Bullion Report 501512
501
Result of the debate 612
513
What if the report of the committee had been adopted
514
Lord Castlereaghs speech on the battle of Albuera 615
516
Great distress in Great Britain at this time
517
The Orders in Council issued by the British Government
518
Their disastrous effects in Great Britain 619
520
Events which led to Lord Castlereagh being appointed Foreign Secretary
521
Assassination of Mr Perceval 621
523
4244 Lord Castlereaghs reply 524526
524
Repeal of the Orders in Council
525
Situation of Europe when Lord Castlereagh returned to power
528
Great change produced by Lord Castlereaghs accession to office
529
Sir Charles Stewarts important services with the Government
544
Conference of Maret and Schwartzenberg
550
Conclusion of this conference
556
Sir Charles Stewarts first steps in Germany
563
387
566
Mutual advance of the opposite armies
569
SO Combat of Weissenfels and death of Bessieres
570
Movements before battle of Liitzeu 671
574
Success of the Allies on the French right and desperate conflicts there 675
577
Crisis of the battle which turns to the advantage of the French
578
The Allies resolve to retreat and Bluchers nocturnal irruptions into Marmonts lines
580
Results of the battle and forces on both sides 531
583
its strategic advantages 684
585
Passage of the Elbe by the French
586
The King of Saxony is reconciled to Napoleon
587
Bolder tone assumed with the Cabinet of Vienna
588
Metternichs proposals on hearing of the battle of Liitzen
589
Metternichs proposals for a general peace
590
Which are repudiated with scorn by Napoleon
591
Napoleons change of plan in consequence of this discovery
592
Napoleons immense preparations for the prosecution of the war
593
His measures to augment the reserve on the Rhine
594
His vast measures for fortifying and strengthening the Elbe
595
Forces of the Allies 695
596
Advance and composition of the French army
597
Opening of a direct negotiation between France and Russia
598
Combat of Konigswartha and defeat of the French
599
Description of the field of battle by Sir Charles Stewart
600
French force and plan of attack
601
Commencement of the battle and progress of the French on the Allied left
602
Progress of the action on tho Allied right and centre
603
Renewal of the battle on the day following
604
Decisive attack of Ney with the French left wing on the Allied right
605
Final and decisive attack of Ney and Marmont upon Blucher
606
Napoleons movements in pursuit of the Allies
607
Combats during the retreat
608
Death of Duroc
610
Continuation of the retreat and combat at Haynau
611
The Allies move towards Bohemia
612
Reasons which led both parties at this period to desire an armistice
613
Reasons against it but it is at length concluded
614
An armistice is agreed to by both parties
615
CHAPTER IX
622
Sir Charles Stewarts account of him in his published work
629
Forces of Great Britain at this time and their distribution
630
His real and Becret views at this period
635
IS Signature of the Treaty of June 15 by England Russia and Prussia
641
Interview of Metternich with Napoleon
647
as Great sensation produced by this interview
653
His works at Torgau Wittenberg and Magdeburg
659
Napoleons plan of operations for the campaign
665
State of the negotiations with Austria
666
Intrepid conduct of Lord Cathcart and Sir Charles Stewart in regard to an Austrian subsidy
668
Change of policy on the part of Bernadotte
670
Treacherous attack on the free corps of Lutzow and the poet Korner
672
Sir Charles Stewarts gloomy views of the negotiations
673
Napoleons delay in sending plenipotentiaries to Prague
674
Fresh difficulty raised by Napoleon as to the form of the conferences
676
Secret conference of Metternich and Narbonne
677
de Narbonne in vain tries to persuade Napoleon of his danger
678
Napoleon goes to Mayence to meet the Empress
680
Final proposals of Austria
681
Noble conduct of M de Caulaincourt
682
Termination of the congress and declaration of war by Austria against France
683
Napoleon tries in vain to engage Austria in a further secret negotiation
684
Fresh effort of M de Caulaincourt to bring about a peace
685
Last effort of Caulaincourt to induce Napoleon to make peace
686
Sir Charles Stewarts confidential conversation with Metternich
687
Grand review of the Austrian army
688
Advance of money to the Austrians by Lord Cathcart and Sir Charles Stewart
689
Difficulties about a commanderinchief
690
French review
691
G4 Reflections on these conferences
692

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Side 136 - Majesty's service, considering this line of conduct as most likely to contribute to its ultimate success. The Catholic body will, therefore, see how much their future hopes must depend upon strengthening their cause by good conduct.
Side 255 - I believe, so far advanced as we should and ought to have been on the night of the 21st. ' I assure you, my dear Lord, matters are not prospering here ; and I feel an earnest desire to quit the army. I have been too successful with this army ever to serve with it in a subordinate situation, with satisfaction to the person who shall command it, and of course not to myself. However, I shall do whatever the Government may wish.
Side 56 - I consider the rebels as now in your power, and I feel assured that your treatment of them will be such as shall make them sensible of their crimes, as well as of the authority of Government. It would be unwise, and contrary, I know, to your own feelings, to drive the wretched people, who are mere instruments in the hands of the more wicked, to despair. The leaders are just objects of punishment...
Side 225 - An English officer of literary celebrity was employed by Alexander, or those who were supposed to share his most secret councils, to convey to the British ministry the emperor's expressions of the secret satisfaction which his Imperial Majesty felt, at the skill and dexterity which Britain had displayed in anticipating and preventing the purposes of France, by her attack upon Copenhagen. Her ministers were invited to communicate freely with the czar, as with a prince, who, though obliged to give...
Side 191 - The evacuation of the country of Hanover, and of the north of Germany. 2. The establishment of the independence of the republics of Holland and Switzerland. 3. The re-establishment of the King of Sardinia in Piedmont, with as large an augmentation of territory as circumstances will admit.
Side 45 - Lord * * * *, where the company consisted of Mr. Fox, Mr. Sheridan, and several other distinguished Whigs, — all persons who had been known to concur warmly in every step of the popular cause in Ireland, and to whom, if Lord Edward did not give some intimation of the object of his present journey, such an effort of reserve and secrecy was, I must say, very unusual in his character.
Side 252 - I shall be obliged to leave Spencer's guns behind for want of means of moving them ; and I should have been obliged to leave my own, if it were not for the horses of the Irish commissariat. Let nobody ever prevail upon you to send a corps to any part of Europe, without horses to draw their guns.
Side 136 - The leading part of his Majesty's ministers, finding insurmountable obstacles to the bringing forward measures of concession to the Catholic body whilst in office, have felt it impossible to continue in administration under the inability to propose it with the circumstances necessary to...
Side 77 - I have seen Mr. Pitt, the Chancellor, and the Duke of Portland, who seem to feel very sensibly the critical situation of our damnable country, and that the Union alone can save it.
Side 368 - Commander-inChief down to the regimental subaltern, occasionally enjoyed the field-sports of hunting, shooting, and fishing. The men, too, had their pastimes, when not employed on duty. In a word, seldom has an army, occupying ground in the face of its enemy, enjoyed so many hours of relaxation, or contrived to unite so completely the pleasures of country life with the serious business of war. It is probably needless to add, that so great a show of security in their leader had the best possible effect...

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