The Statesmen of the Commonwealth of England: With a Treatise on the Popular Progress in English History, Volum 1

Forside
Longman, Orme, Brown, Green & Longmans, 1846
 

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Innhold

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 292 - Who art thou that judgest another man's servant? to his own master he standeth or falleth ; yea, he shall be holden up: for God is able to make him stand.
Side 337 - The noise subsided, and he was asked if he had anything to say why sentence of death should not be passed upon him.
Side 291 - Who coverest thyself with light as with a garment : who stretchest out the heavens like a curtain : Who layeth the beams of his chambers in the waters : who maketh the clouds his chariot : who walketh upon the wings of the wind...
Side 292 - Till body up to spirit work, in bounds Proportioned to each kind. So from the root Springs lighter the green stalk, from thence the leaves More airy, last the bright consummate flower Spirits odorous breathes...
Side 285 - Churches ; and we shall endeavour to bring the Churches of God in the three kingdoms to the nearest conjunction and uniformity in religion, confession of faith, form of Church government, directory for worship and catechising, that we, and our posterity after us, may, as brethren, live in faith and love, and the Lord may delight to dwell in the midst of us.
Side 264 - I am persuaded, his power and interest, at that time, was greater to do good or hurt, than any man's in the kingdom, or than any man of his rank hath had in any time : for his reputation of honesty was universal, and his affections seemed so publicly guided, that no corrupt or private ends could bias them.
Side 232 - Committee of the House of Commons, appointed to inquire into the Bankrupt Laws ; and i This and the two preceding motions were lost by large majorities.
Side xxvii - I marvel much that the house should stand upon granting of a subsidy or the time of payment, when all we have is her majesty's, and she may lawfully at her pleasure take it from us; yea, she hath as much right to all our lands and goods as to any revenue of her crown.
Side 248 - HAMBDEN was a man of much greater cunning, and it may be of the most discerning spirit, and of the greatest address and insinuation to bring any thing to pass which he desired, of any man of that time, and who laid the design deepest.
Side 199 - But herein to our prophets far beneath, As men divinely taught, and better teaching The solid rules of civil government, In their majestic unaffected style, Than all the oratory of Greece and Rome. In them is plainest taught, and easiest learnt, What makes a nation happy, and keeps it so ; What ruins kingdoms, and lays cities flat : These only with our law best form a king.

Bibliografisk informasjon