Selections from the Records of the Government of Bengal, Utgave 33,Del 3

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Side 634 - Where two parties have made a contract which one of them has broken, the damages which the other party ought to receive in respect of such breach of contract should be such as may fairly and reasonably be considered either arising naturally, ie, according to the usual course of things, from such breach of contract itself, or such as may reasonably be supposed to have been in the contemplation of both parties, at the time they made the contract, as the probable result...
Side 634 - But, on the other hand, if these special circumstances were wholly unknown to the party breaking the contract, he, at the most, could only be supposed to have had in his contemplation the amount of injury which would arise generally, and in the great multitude of cases not affected by any special circumstances, from such a breach of contract.
Side 634 - ... may reasonably be supposed to have been in the contemplation of both parties, at the time they made the contract, as the probable result of the breach of it.
Side 634 - Now if the special circumstances under which the contract was actually made were communicated by the plaintiffs to the defendants, and thus known to both parties, the damages resulting from the breach of such a contract, which they would reasonably contemplate, would be the amount of injury which would ordinarily follow from a breach of contract under these special circumstances so known and communicated.
Side 1173 - Ryots they shall retain possession of their own lands, and shall sow on them what crops they please, and the police will be careful that no Indigo Planter nor any one else be able to interfere in the matter, and Indigo Planters shall not be able forcibly to cause Indigo to be sown on the lands of those Ryots on the ground that the Ryots consented to the sowing, &c., of Indigo. If Ryots have so consented, the Indigo Planter may bring an action against them in the Civil Court. The Criminal Court has...
Side 1179 - An Act to enforce the fulfilment of Indigo contracts, and to provide for the appointment of a Commission of Enquiry.
Side 1173 - No. 4516, to the following purport, that in cases of disputes relating to Indigo Ryots they shall retain possession of their own lands, and shall sow on them what crops they please, and the Police will be careful that no Indigo Planter nor any one else be able to interfere in the matter, and Indigo Planters shall not be able forcibly to cause Indigo to be sown on the lands of those Ryots on the ground that the Ryots consented to the sowing, &c., of Indigo.
Side 906 - Secretary to the Government of Bengal. To — The Secretary to the Government of India, Home Department.
Side 1185 - ... labour, and one which the Government would above all others wish to encourage. That although your petitioners are convinced of this desire on the part of the Government of India, the present Governor of Bengal, the Honourable John Peter Grant, has since his appointment to his present office unfortunately acted in such a way as to throw nearly the whole of the Indigo districts, and especially Kishnaghur, into confusion, and unless something be done to remedy the present system of misrule, many...
Side 1172 - The planter is not at liberty, under pretext of having promised to sow indigo for him, to enter forcibly upon the land of the ryot. Such promises can only be produced against the ryot in the civil court, and the magisterial authorities have nothing to do with them, for there must be two parties to a promise; and it is possible that the ryots, whose.

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