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tion, reading aloud, and conversation. Candidates who satisfy the Examiners in this portion of the Examination as well as in that conducted on paper, will have a special note to that effect added to their Certificates.

In Section B Candidates must satisfy the Delegates in the general outlines of Greek History from B.C. 510 to the death of Alexander the Great, and of Roman History from the beginning of the First Punic war to the accession of Nerva, and must shew an accurate knowledge of one of the following periods : 1. From the outbreak of the Peloponnesian war to the peace of An

talcidas. 2. From the accession of Philip of Macedon to the death of Alexander. 3. From the beginning of the Second Punic war to the destruction of Carthage. 4. From the death of Sulla to

the death of Augustus. In Section C Candidates must satisfy the Delegates in the general outlines of English History from the accession of Henry II to the Revolution of 1688, and shew an accurate knowledge of one of the following periods : 1. The thirty years' war. 2. The reign of Louis XIV. 3. The acces

sion of Charles I to the Revolution of 1688. In Section D Candidates must satisfy the Delegates in 1. Algebra, including quadratic equations and the simplest properties of

Ratio and Proportion. 2. Euclid, Books I-IV. 3. The elements of Mechanics, including the properties of matter, the composition and resolution of forces, centre of gravity, the simple machines and the application of virtual velocities to them, the laws of motion, the

laws of falling bodies, and the motion of projectiles. In Section E Candidates must satisfy the Delegates in the elements of 1. PHYSICS ; 2. CHEMISTRY. They will also be permitted to offer for Examination the elements of 3. BIOLOGY; 4. GEOLOGY.

1. Physics. Candidates will be examined in (1) Mechanics, and in one at least of the following subjects, viz. : (2) Heat; (3) Light and Sound ; (4) Magnetism and Electricity. The extent to which these subjects will be required is represented by their treatment in Ganot's “ Elementary Treatise on Physics” or Deschanel's “ Elementary Treatise on Natural Philosophy,” translated by Professor Everett.

2. CHEMISTRY. Candidates will be examined in this subject to the extent represented by Roscoe's “Lessons in Elementary Chemistry,” to page 289.

They must also pass a practical Examination, which will comprise the analysis of single substances, and such elementary exercises as are included in Harcourt and Madan's “Exercises in Practical Chemistry.”

3. BIOLOGY. Candidates will be examined in (1) The Elements of General Biology to the extent represented by

Huxley and Martin's “ Elementary Biology."

” may

(2) Botany to the extent represented by Bentley's “Manual of

Botany,” Book I, and Book II chaps. I and 2, together with a knowledge of the leading structural and physiological characteristics of the following Classes of the Vegetable Kingdom, viz. : (1) Algæ; (2) Fungi ; (3) Lichenes; (4) Characeæ ; (5) Musci ; (6) Filices; (7) Lycopodiaceæ; (8) Coniferæ ; (9) Phanerogamia,

a Monocotyledones, 6 Dicotyledones. (3) Animal Physiology to the extent represented by Huxley's “Elemen

tary Lessons in Physiology." Huxley's “Anatomy of Invertebrated Animals,” and “ Anatomy of Vertebrated Animals”

also be consulted. Candidates must also pass a practical Examination in which they will be required to dissect and describe plants and parts of plants, and such common animals as are given in Huxley and Martin's “Elementary Biology."

4. GEOLOGY. Candidates will be examined in this subject to the extent represented by Sir C. Lyell's “Student's Elements of Geology."

They must also pass a practical Examination in which they
must shew an acquaintance with the general characters of the
more common rocks and fossils.
Candidates who pass in Section E may

offer
any

two of the four subjects on a future occasion.

In Section F Candidates must satisfy the Delegates in
1. The Elements of Logic to the extent represented by Whately's

“Elements of Logic”. (omitting the Appendices); and Jevons’s

“Elementary Lessons in Logic" (omitting chapters 22 and 23). 2. The Elements of Political Economy to the extent represented by

Adam Smith's “ Wealth of Nations,” Books I and II.

Examination for Honours.

2. THE EXAMINATION FOR HONOURS will include eight sections. No Candidate will be examined in more than one of these sections at the same Examination. Candidates will be divided into three classes in each section, according to their merits, and the names in each class will be placed in alphabetical order. The Delegates will place in the highest class such only as shew great proficiency. The eight sections will be

1. English. 2. Latin and Greek. 3. German, French, Italian, and Spanish. 4. Mathematics, Pure and Mixed. 5. Ancient History, with Latin and Greek Texts. 6. Modern History, with Original Texts. 7. Philosophy. 8. Physical Science.

1. English. Papers will be given on English Literature from Chaucer to Wordsworth, and on the philology and growth of the English Language. The following authors must be specially studied.

Chaucer. The Prologue ; The Knightes Dryden. Absalom and Achitophel, Part I. Tale (Morris).

Addison. Selections, iv. v. vi. (Clarendon Piers the Plowman (Skeat).

Press Series). Spenser's Faery Queen, Books I and II. Pope. Essay on Man. Hooker. Ecclesiastical Polity, Book I. Johnson. Lives of Milton, Dryden, Pope. Shakspeare. Macbeth ; Richard II ; Burke. On Present Discontents. Tempest.

Wordsworth. Poems of Fancy and ImBacon. Essays.

agination. [See Moxon's Edition in Milton. Minor Poems (omitting Comus); six volumes.

Vol. 2.]
Paradise Lost, I-IV; Areopagitica. Byron. Childe Harold, Cantos 3, 4.

2. Latin and Greek. This Examination will consist of composition in these languages, of papers on the philology and grammar of the languages, and of unprepared passages for translation into English. "Papers will also be set on the following books which must be specially studied. LATIN.

GREEK. Virgil. Georgics; Æneid I–VI. Homer. Odyssey I-XII. Horace. Odes; Epistles; Ars Poet. Sophocles. Antigone; Electra; Ed. Cicero. Pro Murenâ; Pro Sestio; with Rex; Ed. Coloneus.

Part II of Watson's Select Letters. Euripides. Medea ; Alcestis; Bacche; Pliny. Letters.

Hecuba.
Demosthenes. De Coronâ.

Æschines. In Ctesiphontem. 3. German, French, Italian, and Spanish. Candidates must offer German and one at least of the other three languages. The Examination will consist of composition in the languages offered; of papers on the philology and grammar of these languages; and of unprepared passages for translation into English. Papers will also be set on the following books which must be specially studied. GERMAN.

Corneille, Le Cid; Racine, Athalie ; The Nibelungenlied

Voltaire, Mérope. Walther von der Vogelweide

Sainte Beuve. Causeries du Lundi, (edited with notes in Pfeiffer's Deutsche

Vol. IX. Classiker des Mittelalters, Voll. 3

ITALIAN.

Dante. Inferno; Vita Nuova. Schiller. Wallenstein (Prolog; Wallen

Petrarca.

Trionfi. stein's Lager; Die Piccolomini ; Wal- Alfieri. Filippo ; Saul; La Congiura lenstein's Tod); Wilhelm Tell.

dei Pazzi. Goethe. Faust, Part I; Gedichte (Lie- Villari. Vita di Savonarola.

der, Gesellige Lieder).
Lessing. Nathan der Weise ; Laocoon.

SPANISH
Poema del Cid (Sanchez, Poesias Cas-

tellanas).
FRENCH.

Calderon. El principe constante; El Joinville. Mémoires.

magico prodigioso; Darlo todo y no Molière. Le Misanthrope; Les Femmes dar nada; Fineza contra fineza.

Savantes; Les Précieuses Ridicules ; Cervantes. Don Quijote, Part II.
Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme.

Solis. Historia de la conquista de Méjico. The Certificates issued to the Candidates will specify the languages in which they have gained distinction.

A vivá voce Examination in the Modern Languages for such as desire it will be held in Oxford and at such other large Centres as the Delegates may appoint. This will comprise writing from dictation, reading aloud, and conversation. Candidates who satisfy the

and I).

Examiners in this portion of the Examination as well as in that conducted on paper, will have a special note to that effect added to their Certificates.

Candidates who pass in this Section may offer any two of the selected languages on a future occasion. 4. Mathematics. Pure and Mixed. Papers will be set in PURE MATHEMATICS.

MIXED MATHEMATICS.
Algebra.

Mechanics.
Trigonometry, Plane and Spherical. Hydrostatics.
Pure Geometry, and the Elements of The Elements of Optics.
Analytical Geometry.

The Elements of Astronomy.
The Elements of Differential and In-
tegral Calculus.

5. Ancient History, &c. Papers will be set on Greek History from the earliest times to the death of Demosthenes, B.C. 322, and on Roman History from the earliest times to the death of Domitian. The following modern authors are recommended for study :-in Greek History, Grote, Curtius, Boeckh (Public Economy of Athens); in Roman History, Mommsen, Ihne, Merivale (Romans under the Empire). Candidates must offer in addition the following books, from the text of which passages will be set. Livy I-X, or XXI-XXX.

Caesar, De Bello Civili.
Tacitus, Annals.

Herodotus.
Caesar, De Bello Gallico.

Thucydides. 6. Modern History, &c. Papers will be set on (1) the History of England, including Constitutional History, to the Accession of Queen Victoria; (2) one of the following special periods of History, both English and Foreign, to be known accurately, viz. : From the Great Charter to the Accession

of Edward IV, with Joinville, Matthew Paris (1235–1259), and Froissart (from the beginning of Edward III's war in France to the deposition of Richard II). Or, From the Accession of Edward IV to the death of Elizabeth, with Bacon's Henry VII, Cavendish's Wolsey, and Philip de Commines. Passages for explanation and translation will be set from the text of these authors.

The following books are recommended for study : I. ON ENGLISH HISTORY. (1) Constitutional History :-Stubbs' Select Charters and Constitutional History; Hallam's Middle Ages and Constitutional History; May's Constitutional History. (2) General History :-Lappenberg's Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman Kings, (or Kemble's Saxons in England) with Freeman's OldEnglish History; Lingard's History of England, from Henry II; Ranke's English History. For the Hanoverian period no books are recommended, but Candidates are required to supplement their study of Hallam and May by an adequate knowledge of the continuous political history. This head of examination must be taken to include the social and literary history, and the history of the growth of the English Colonies and Dependencies.

II, ON THE SPECIAL PERIODS (in addition to the books ned above). (1) Milman's Latin Christianity; Hallam's Middle Ages ; Coxe's House of Austria ; Michelet's Histoire de France. Or (2) Robertson's Charles V; Coxe's House of Austria ; Ranke's History of the Popes and History of Germany during the period of the Reformation; Roscoe's Life of Lorenzo de' Medici and Life of Leo Š; Sismondi's Histoire des Français.

7. Philosophy. In this Section general papers will be set. Candidates must also offer at least two of the following groups of books, which must be specially studied. Passages will be set from the text of the books selected. If only two groups be offered (4) may not be combined with either (2) or (5), and (6) and (7) may not be taken together. (1) Aristotle. Nicomachean Ethics;

Philosophy. Elementa Logices Aristoteleae Butler. Preface and Three Sermons (Trendelenburg).

on Human Nature, with the DisPlato. Protagoras, Gorgias, Phi

sertation on Virtue. lebus, Theaetetus, Phaedo, and Bentham. Treatise of Legislation, Euthydemus.

by Dumont, translated by Hild(2) Bacon. Novum Organon.

reth : Introduction (Principles of Descartes. Discours de la Méthode.

Legislation); Civil Code, Parts I, Spinoza. Tractatus de Intellectus

II; Penal Code, Parts I, II.
Emendatione.

Mill. Utilitarianism.
Locke. Essay on the Human Un. Sidgwick. Methods of Ethics.
derstanding

(6) Aristotle. Politics. Leibnitz. Nouveaux Essais Philo- Plato. Republic. sophiques.

Maine. Ancient Law; Early In(3) Berkeley. Treatise on the Prin

stitutions. ciples of Human Knowledge ; Cornewall Lewis. Use and Abuse Alciphron; An Essay towards a

of Political Terms. New Theory of Vision.

Bagehot. English Constitution. Hume. Treatise of Human Nature. (7) Bluntschli. Staatsrecht. Kant. Prolegomena zu einer jeden De Tocqueville. De la Démocratie künftigen Metaphysik; Grundle

en Amérique. gung zur Metaphysik der Sitten.

Blanqui. Histoire d'Économie Poli(4) Sir W. Hamilton. Lectures on Logic

tique. and Metaphysics.

Adam Smith. Wealth of Nations Mansel. Prolegomena Logica.

(except Book IV). Mill. Logic; Examination of the Mill. Political Economy (except Philosophy of Sir. W. Hamilton.

Book IV);

on representative (5) Mackintosh. Introduction to Ethical Government; on Liberty.

A general acquaintance with the History of Philosophy will be required, and Candidates will also be expected to shew a more detailed knowledge of the periods and branches of philosophy specially represented by the groups of authors offered.

8. Physical Science. Candidates must shew an acquaintance with one or more of the following subjects, viz. : 1. Physics. 2. CHEMISTRY. 3. BIOLOGY. 4. GEOLOGY.

1. Physics. Candidates must shew an accurate general knowledge of Physics; they will also be allowed to present themselves for a more detailed examination in one or more of the following branches of Physics, viz. : (1) Sound ; (2) Heat; (3) Light; (4) Electricity and Magnetism. For the highest honours a Mathematical treatment of these subjects will be required.

2. CHEMISTRY. Candidates will be examined in the following subjects: (1) Chemical Physics ; (2) Inorganic Chemistry; (3) Organic Chemistry; (4) General and Theoretical Chemistry.

There will also be a practical Examination which will comprise (5) The Qualitative Analysis of Inorganic Substances ; (6) The Quantitative Analysis of Inorganic Substances. The use of books will be allowed to Candidates in the Practical Examination. 3. BIOLOGY.

Candidates will be examined in the general principles of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology.

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