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Examination of Women.

REGULATIONS FOR THE YEAR 1883. The condition restricting the Examinations to Women over Eighteen

Years of age has been removed. The Examinations will consist of a First Examination and a Second Examination. These cannot be passed by any Candidate in the same calendar year. No Candidate will be admitted to the Second Examination unless she has passed the First, or some other Examination accepted by the Delegates as equivalent.

At present the Delegates accept as nt—the Matriculation Examination of the University of London (or the General Examination for Women): the Cambridge Higher Local Examinations, if the Candidate has passed in Group C and with distinction in two languages of Group B: the Oxford Senior Local Examinations, if the Candidate has passed in Section C, and with the special recommendation of the Examiners in two languages of Section B: The Examination for Certificates of the Oxford and Cambridge Schools Examination Board, if the Candidate has passed in two subjects of Group I and in Elementary Mathematics.

The First Examination will be held in June and December 1883.
The Second Examination will be held in June 1883 only.

The Examinations to be held in June will commence on the 4th of June 1883, and the Examination to be held in December will commence upon the roth of December 1883.

Candidates for the Examinations to be held in June may be examined, with consent of the Local Secretary and upon payment of the Local Fee (if any), at any of the places appointed for the Local Examination of Girls, except London. Candidates for the Examination to be held in December will be examined in Oxford only. Printed forms of entry for the Examinations to be held in June may be obtained from G. E. BAKER, Esq., Clarendon Building, Oxford, on and after February ist, and must be returned to him with the Fees, those for the Second Examination on or before March 3rd, and those for the First Examination on or before April 14. Forms for the First Examination, to be held in December, may be obtained in the same way on and after October ist, and must be returned with the Fees on or before November ist.

There will be a First Examination held under the Regulations for 1882 in December 1882 in Oxford only. The Examination will commence upon the inth of December 1882. Forms of entry may be obtained from G. E. BAKER, Esq., Clarendon Building, Oxford, on and after October ist, and must be returned with the Fees on or before November ist 1882.

The Fees payable will be for the First Examination, or for the Examination in the Rudiments of Faith and Religion, £2; and £2 ros. for the Pass Examination, or for the Examination for Honours. No Fee can be returned under any circumstances, or be carried to the credit of a Candidate at a subsequent Examination.

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I. THE FIRST EXAMINATION. Every Candidate will be required to satisfy the Delegates in 1. English Composition. 2. Any two of the following languages : (a) Latin, (6) Greek, (c) French or Italian,

(d) German.
3. Arithmetic.
4. (a) Euclid, Books I and II or (6) Algebra to Simple

Equations, including Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication,
Division, Greatest Common Measure, Least Common Mul-
tiple, Fractions, Extraction of Square Root, and Simple
Equations containing one or two unknown quantities, and

problems producing such equations.
In all the Exercises attention must be given to spelling, punc-
tuation, and correctness of expression.
The books to be prepared in Latin and Greek are
Latin. Cæsar, Bell. Gall. I, II.

Virgil, Æneid I.
Greek. Euripides, Alcestis.

Plato, Apologia. Candidates will be expected to answer questions on the Grammar of the languages selected, and to translate a piece of easy English into Latin, French or Italian, and German, as the case may be.

II. THE SECOND EXAMINATION
Will consist of a Pass Examination and an Examination for
Honours.

1. THE PASS EXAMINATION will consist of Six Sections, viz. The Pass Examina A. Languages. B. Ancient History. C. Modern tion,

History. D. Mathematics. E. Physical Science.
F. Logic and Political Economy.

Candidates will not satisfy the Delegates unless they pass, at the same Examination, in Section A and in one of the other Sections. Candidates, who have so passed, may offer any of the other Sections at a subsequent Examination. No Candidate will be examined in more than two of Sections B, C, D, E, F, at any one Examination.

In Section A the Examination will be in the same languages as those prescribed for the First Examination, but will be of a higher character. Candidates will be required to pass in two languages.

The books to be prepared in Latin and Greek are
Latin. Cicero, De Senect., De Amicitia, and Pro Roscio. Horace, Odes Book II and

Ars Poetica.
Greek. Thucydides IV. .

Sophocles, Antigone.
A vivá voce Examination in the Modern Languages for such as
desire it will be held in Oxford and at such other large Centres as
the Delegates may appoint. This will comprise writing from dicta-

tion, reading aloud, and conversation. Candidates who satisfy the Examiners in this portion of the Examination as well as in that conducted on paper, will have a special note to that effect added to their Certificates.

In Section B Candidates must satisfy the Delegates in the general outlines of Greek History from B.C. 510 to the death of Alexander the Great, and of Roman History from the beginning of the First Punic war to the accession of Nerva, and must shew an accurate knowledge of one of the following periods : 1. From the outbreak of the Peloponnesian war to the peace of An

talcidas. 2. From the accession of Philip of Macedon to the death of Alexander. 3. From the beginning of the Second Punic war to the destruction of Carthage. 4. From the death of Sulla to

the death of Augustus. In Section C Candidates must satisfy the Delegates in the general outlines of English History from the accession of Henry II to the Revolution of 1688, and shew an accurate knowledge of one of the following periods : 1. The thirty years' war. 2. The reign of Louis XIV. 3. The acces

sion of Charles I to the Revolution of 1688. In Section D Candidates must satisfy the Delegates in 1. Algebra, including quadratic equations and the simplest properties of

Ratio and Proportion. 2. Euclid, Books I-IV. 3. The elements of Mechanics, including the properties of matter, the composition and resolution of forces, centre of gravity, the simple machines and the application of virtual velocities to them, the laws of motion, the

laws of falling bodies, and the motion of projectiles. In Section E Candidates must satisfy the Delegates in the elements of 1. PHYSICS ; 2. CHEMISTRY. They will also be permitted to offer for Examination the elements of 3. BIOLOGY; 4. GEOLOGY.

1. Physics. Candidates will be examined in (1) Mechanics, and in one at least of the following subjects, viz. : (2) Heat; (3) Light and Sound ; (4) Magnetism and Electricity. The extent to which these subjects will be required is represented by their treatment in Ganot's “ Elementary Treatise on Physics” or Deschanel's “ Elementary Treatise on Natural Philosophy,” translated by Professor Everett.

2. CHEMISTRY. Candidates will be examined in this subject to the extent represented by Roscoe's “Lessons in Elementary Chemistry,” to page 289.

They must also pass a practical Examination, which will comprise the analysis of single substances, and such elementary exercises as are included in Harcourt and Madan's “Exercises in Practical Chemistry.”

3. BIOLOGY. Candidates will be examined in (1) The Elements of General Biology to the extent represented by

Huxley and Martin's “ Elementary Biology."

(2) Botany to the extent represented by Bentley's “Manual of

Botany," Book I, and Book II chaps. I and 2, together with a knowledge of the leading structural and physiological characteristics of the following Classes of the Vegetable Kingdom, viz. : (1) Algæ; (2) Fungi ; (3) Lichenes; (4) Characeæ ; (5) Musci; (6) Filices ; (7) Lycopodiaceæ; (8) Coniferæ ; (9) Phanerogamia,

a Monocotyledones, 6 Dicotyledones. (3) Animal Physiology to the extent represented by Huxley's “ Elemen

tary Lessons in Physiology.” Huxley's “ Anatomy of Invertebrated Animals,” and “ Anatomy of Vertebrated Animals” may

also be consulted. Candidates must also pass a practical Examination in which they will be required to dissect and describe plants and parts of plants, and such common animals as are given in Huxley and Martin's “ Elementary Biology."

4. GEOLOGY. Candidates will be examined in this subject to the extent represented by Sir C. Lyell's “Student's Elements of Geology."

They must also pass a practical Examination in which they must shew an acquaintance with the general characters of the more common rocks and fossils.

Candidates who pass in Section E may offer any two of the four subjects on a future occasion.

In Section F Candidates must satisfy the Delegates in
1. The Elements of Logic to the extent represented by Whately's

“Elements of Logic" (omitting the Appendices); and Jevons's

" Elementary Lessons in Logic" (omitting chapters 22 and 23). 2. The Elements of Political Economy to the extent represented by

Adam Smith's “ Wealth of Nations,” Books I and II.

Examination for Honours.

2. THE EXAMINATION FOR HONOURS will include eight sections. No Candidate will be examined in more than one of these sections at the same Examination. Candidates will be divided into three classes in each section, according to their merits, and the names in each class will be placed in alphabetical order. The Delegates will place in the highest class such only as shew great proficiency. The eight sections will be

1. English. 2. Latin and Greek. 3. German, French, Italian, and Spanish. 4. Mathematics, Pure and Mixed. 5. Ancient History, with Latin and Greek Texts. 6. Modern History, with Original Texts. 7. Philosophy. 8. Physical Science.

1. English. Papers will be given on English Literature from Chaucer to Wordsworth, and on the philology and growth of the English Language. The following authors must be specially studied.

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