Memoirs of the Public and Private Life of Napoleon Bonaparte, Volum 1

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Side 277 - I am sure you must be aware that his Majesty cannot, and never will, in consequence of any representation or any menace from a foreign power, make any concession which can be in the smallest degree dangerous to the liberty of the press, as secured by the constitution of this country.
Side 334 - Majesty has gained more in ten years, both in territory and riches, than the whole extent of Europe. Your nation is at the highest point of prosperity ; what can it hope from war ? To form a coalition with some powers of the Continent ? The Continent will remain tranquil : 334 MEMOIRS OF [1805. a coalition can only increase the preponderance and continental greatness of France.
Side 333 - Called to the throne of France by Providence, and by the suffrages of the senate, the people and the army, my first sentiment is a wish for peace. France and England abuse their prosperity. They may contend for ages ; but do their governments well fulfil the most sacred of their duties, and will not so much blood shed uselessly, and without a view to any end, condemn them in their own consciences ? I consider it no disgrace to make the first step.
Side 410 - So little was the nature of the Council of State under180 THE COUNCIL OF STATE. stood by people in general that it was believed no one dared utter a word in that assembly in opposition to the Emperor's opinion. Thus I very much surprised many persons when I related the fact that, one day, during a •very animated debate, the Emperor, having been interrupted three times in giving his opinion, turned towards • the individual who had rather rudely cut him short, and said in a sharp tone : " I have...
Side 333 - I consider it as no disgrace to make the first step. I have, I hope, sufficiently proved to the world, that I fear none of the chances of war : it, besides, presents nothing that I need to fear.
Side 284 - I cannot pretend to know," said Louis, " what may be the intentions of the Almighty respecting my race and myself; but I am well aware of the obligations imposed upon me by the rank to which he was pleased I should be born. As a Christian, I shall continue to fulfil these obligations to my last breath. As a descendant of St. Louis, I shall endeavour to imitate his example, by respecting myself — even in captivity and chains. As successor of Francis the First, I shall at least aspire to say with...
Side 289 - I told him that it was very far from his majesty's intention. He then proceeded to count Markoff and the chevalier Azara, who were standing together at a little distance from me, and said to them, ' The English wish for war; but if they are the first to draw the sword, I shall be the last to sheathe it. They have no regard for treaties : we must henceforth cover them with shame.
Side 333 - Your majesty has gained more within ten years, both in territory and riches, than the whole extent of Europe. Your nation is at the highest point of prosperity ; what can it hope from war ? — To form a coalition with some powers of the continent ? the continent will remain tranquil : a coalition can only increase the preponderance and continental greatness of France.
Side 334 - Alas ! what a melancholy prospect to cause two nations to fight merely for the sake of fighting. The world is sufficiently large for our two nations to live in it, and reason is sufficiently powerful to discover means of reconciling every thing, when the wish for reconciliation exists on both sides. I have, however, fulfilled a sacred duty, and one which is precious to my heart.
Side 301 - I have long since renounced the hope of enjoying the pleasures of private life. All my days are employed in fulfilling the duties which my fate, and the will of the French people, have imposed upon me. Heaven will watch over France, and defeat the plots of the wicked. The citizens may be without alarm. My life will last as long as it will be useful for the nation ; but I wish the French people to understand, that existence, without their confidence and affection, would be for me without consolation,...