Latin Exercises: Adapted to Andrews and Stoddard's Latin Grammar

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Crocker and Brewster, 1839 - 336 sider
 

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Side 320 - So the sweet lark, high poised in air. Shuts close his pinions to his breast (If, chance, his mate's shrill call he hear), And drops at once into her nest. The noblest captain in the British fleet Might envy William's lip those kisses sweet.
Side 333 - When in the slippery paths of youth With heedless steps I ran, Thine arm, unseen, conveyed me safe, And led me up to man.
Side 333 - To all my weak complaints and cries Thy mercy lent an ear, Ere yet my feeble thoughts had learnt To form themselves in prayer.
Side 333 - When all thy mercies, O my God, my rising soul surveys, transported with the view, I'm lost in wonder, love, and praise. No. 78. 3 2 O how shall words with equal warmth the gratitude declare, that .glows within my ravish'd heart! but thou canst read it there.
Side 142 - ... this man alone is removed from this piratical crew, we may appear, perhaps, for a short time relieved from fear and anxiety, but the danger will settle down and lie hid in the veins and bowels of the republic. As it often happens that men afflicted with a severe disease, when they are tortured...
Side 92 - The name of a town (91) where any thing is or is done, if of the first or second declension, and singular number, is put in the genitive ! otherwise, in the ablative ; eg, 1.
Side 277 - HEXAMETER. The Hexameter or heroic verse consists of six feet. Of these the fifth is a dactyle, and the sixth a spondee ; all the rest may be either dactyles or spondees ; as, Ludere I quffi velíuíUu dumRe lém cala- I mo per- I mïsït ä- I gristl.
Side 25 - A noun in the predicate, after a verb neuter or passive, is put in the same case as the subject, when it denotes the same person or thing ; as, Ira furor brevis est, Anger is a short madness.
Side 167 - A noun and a participle are put in the ablative, called absolute, to denote the time, cause or concomitant of an action, or the condition on which it depends...
Side 286 - Cethegi of ancient times, though now deformed dust and neglected age presses upon them : he will adopt new words, which use, the parent [of language], shall produce : forcible and perspicuous, and bearing the utmost similitude to a limpid stream, he will pour out his treasures, and enrich Latium with a comprehensive language. The luxuriant he will lop, the too harsh he will soften with a sensible cultivation: those void of expression he will discard: he will exhibit the appearance of one at play...

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