the u.s. naval astronomical expedition

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Extraordinary dryness and transparency of the air 82 Winter at Valdivia 83 At the Island of Chilóe 83 SPRING at Santi
88
EARTHQUAKES
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105 The earthquake of December 6 1850 105 That of April 2 1851 108 Succeeding lesser agitations 115 May 26 1851
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CHAPTER V
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mission 132 The President 133 Cabinet ministers 133 Council of State 134 Provincial government 134 The administration
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Courtship 146 Forced inarriages 146 A marriage 147 Births 148 A christening 149 Social education
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160 Monasteries 160 The Dominicans 160 Franciscans 160 Recoleta Franciscans 160 Franciscan hermits 160 Merce
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darios white friars 161 Sacred Heart 161 Ceremonies on Ash Wednesday 161 Death of a dean of the cathedral 162 Exo
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Cathedral 180 Other churches 181 Convent of the Claras 182 La Merced 182 Santo Domingo 182 San Augustin 182
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Game 184 Fish 184 Vegetables 184 Fruits 185 Flowers 186 Bridges 187 The Tajamar breakwater 187 The Cañada
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fectionery 198 The Penitentiary 198 House of correction 201 Almshouse 201 Beggars 201 Insane persons 203 Asilia
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warehouses 228 Hospitals and Almshouse 228 Want of amusements 229 Population 229 Table of mortality during
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the mint during the same period 236 Table showing the principal exports and the value of each 237 Table showing the prin
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Marine fossils 246 Origin of the railroad 246 Leave Caldera for the interior 248 Appearance of the country 248 Sterility
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Village of Totoralillo 253 La Angostura 253 Water 254 Cuesta de Chañarcillo 254 Apertures in the hills by the roadside
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Minerstheir strength 259 Pilfering 259 Receivers of stolen ores 259 Gambling 259 Geological description of El Bolaco
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Meteorology at Caldera 270 Musical fish 270 Return to Valparaiso and from thence back to Coquimbo 271 Coquimbo bay
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Freirina and Vallenar 284 Mines of Carriso 284 Agua Amarga 285 Tunas 285 Camerones 285 Arqueros 286 Algodones
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Concepcion 291 Analysis of the coals 292 Other mines in Chile 293 English attempts to work the mines 293 Their failure
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A night in the cabins 299 Cauquenes 300 Celebrated for the cure of certain diseases 300 Beautiful location 300 Panimavila
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Side 242 - But Abraham said, Son, remember that thou in thy lifetime receivedst thy good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented. And beside all this, between us and you there is a great gulf fixed; so that they which would pass from hence to you cannot; neither can they pass to us, that would come from thence.
Side 35 - Peru, he gives so many cedar-planks, hams, or punchos, in exchange. Some time after we had been here, a snow arrived in the harbour from Lima, which occasioned great joy amongst the inhabitants, as they had no ship the year before, from the alarm Lord Anson had given upon the coast. 'This 'was not the annual vessel, but one of those that I mentioned before which come unexpectedly. The captain of her was an old man, well known upon the island, who had traded here once in two or three years for more...
Side 35 - Lima, as they never expect more than one in the year; tho' sometimes it happens that two have come, and at other times they have been two or three years without any. When this happens, they are greatly distressed, as this ship brings them baize, cloth, linens, hats, ribbons, tobacco, sugar, brandy, and wine ; but this latter article is chiefly for the use of the churches : matte, an herb from Paraguay, used all over South America instead of tea, is also a necessary article. This ship's cargo is chiefly...
Side 122 - ... which will insinuate itself under them, will be raised in their turn, till it either finds some vent or is again condensed by the cold into water, and by that means prevented from proceeding any further.
Side 122 - In like manner, a large quantity of vapor may be conceived to raise the earth in a wave, as it passes along between the strata, which it may easily separate in a horizontal direction, there being little or no cohesion between one stratum and another. The part of the earth that is first raised, being bent from its natural form, will...
Side 122 - ... upon a floor) to be raised at one edge, and then suddenly brought down again to the floor, the air under it being by this means propelled, will pass along, till it escapes at the opposite side, raising the cloth in a wave all the way as it goes. In like manner, a large quantity of vapour may be conceived to raise the earth in a wave, as it passes along between the strata which it may easily separate in an horizontal direction, there being little or no cohesion between one stratum and another.
Side iii - Academy of Arts and Sciences, has recently returned to the United States, bringing with him a rich contribution to science, in a series of observations amounting to nearly forty thousand, and embracing a most extensive catalogue of stars.
Side 114 - I feel so confident that you are nt liberty to submit them to your scientific friends if you please, and if any require further particulars I shall be happy to give them. I may, however, add something more ; — the barometer and thermometer indicated nothing, nor was there the least warning of any description ; but as invariably occurs after a heavy shock, we had on the third day after a shower of twelve hours' rain, for which I had already prepared, aware of its being the consequence, happen at...
Side 114 - ... R. Budge, FRGS, considers* the motion to have been westward, because water in basins, jugs, &c., spilt over the east side; clocks whose pendulums vibrated east and west stopped, •while those beating north and south did not ; walls standing east and west were cracked in every way — particularly lengthways, and vessels at sea felt it at an hour corresponding to the difference of longitude. He supposes the phenomenon to have been subject to instantaneous cessations, and says that it turned round...
Side 122 - Suppose a large cloth or carpet, spread on the floor, to be raised at one edge, and then suddenly brought down again to the floor, the air under it, being by this means propelled, will pass along till it escapes at the opposite side, raising the cloth in a wave all the way as it goes, In like manner a large quantity of...

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