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ON

THE DELINEATION OF FORM;

INTENDED TO BE

PREPARATORY

TO

ELEMENTARY WRITING

OR

OUTLINE DRAWING.

BY THE REV. CHARLES RICHSON, M.A.,

CLERK IN ORDERS OF THE CATHEDRAL, MANCHESTER.

WITH AN INTRODUCTION,

BY GEORGE WALLIS,

LATE HEAD MASTER OF THE MANCHESTER SCHOOL OF DESIGN.

LONDON:
DARTON & CO., HOLBORN HILL.

MANCHESTER : PRINTED BY T. SOWLER, H, SAINT ANY'S-SQUARE.

PREFACE.

Few persons have made themselves acquainted with the management of Juvenile and Infant Schools in poor and populous districts without feeling regret that so little attention is paid, as is common in the former class of schools, to the study of drawing, and that in the latter, so little variety should be introduced into the collective exercises for teaching children to write. The want of adequate assistance to attend to such subjects has often been pleaded as an excuse for their neglect, but, since the recent measures of Government, by introducing an efficient class of assistants into schools for the poor, will afford increased facilities for conveying useful instruction, the ground for such excuse is in course of removal.

The design of the following Lessons is to assist in making linear construction a familiar study in elementary schools, and the obvious connexion between outline drawing and the elements of writing appears to afford an apt facility for such a purpose. In this design, however, there is nothing entirely new, and in the arrangement of the exercises, the Author has to acknowledge some suggestions from an American publication, entitled, “Graphics; a Manual of Drawing and Writing, by Rembrant Peale."

In any new attempt at recommending the use of linear examples in preference to rigid models for teaching OUTLINE DRAWING, it ought to be remarked that the very useful work by Mr. Butler Williams, which has received the high sanction of the Committee of Privy Council, and is entitled “Instruction in Drawing for the Use of Elementary Schools," is designed to promote the use of rigid forms, such as wire models, in preference to linear examples in teaching the elements of this art. But although there are few teachers of drawing, who have attained any eminence in their profession, that will not admit the great importance of using rigid models as early as possible, there are many who consider that some effectual means of disciplining both the eye and hand ought to be adopted before examples of this kind are introduced. In attempting the delineation of form, a child finds less mental effort in copying a drawing than in describing a model, and hence many teachers recommend that linear examples should precede rigid forms in giving elementary instruction. In this view of the subject, the Author of the following Lessons entirely concurs, and it is gratifying to him to find that the opinion which he entertains is confirmed by so experienced a teacher as Mr. Wallis, whose remarks on the connexion which subsists between outline drawing and elementary writing form the first chapter of this work.

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