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the subssion was moved this

baitutions, the House, thien, by the subject gentleman that he commenced his excellent

the mean

of the House. He would not, indeed, have decide as to what were the necessary and saluselling that

Been among them those incessant talkers, who tary privileges of members of that House, and am one of discus all questions, great and small, and speak at the same time were to keep a watchful eye those who

by the hour and the day; but he would have on the rights of the citizen, so as not to pass 3 sense of observed with me much of the silent unabtru. the narrow barrier betwixt the exercise of right But an end sive wisdom of this body. Were it not for this and the infiction of wrong. Whilst endeavor. ad already

circumstance, I should feel so severe a censure, ing then, to ascertain and exercise those rights Touse, but from a source on evalled and respectable, as which are necessary to distinguish a deliber. I was ulmust insupportable

ative body, guided by the light of reason, and Ecollect the Thave, however, an humble request to make acting on the dictates of justice--from a mere ѕ сопimen Edhe kunorable member from South Carolina. mob, driven by force, or influenced by threats; ill be now

It is this: Wat whenever, hereafter, he shall and at the same time desirous carefully to avoid the nation, sze me fall ng into a dangerous error, and infringing upon the rights of individuals—he not been deem bis reproof necessary, he will be good had thought it becoming that the House should

enchugh to remember his own strength and my act cautiously and with reflection; he thought

weakness and if he cannot reprove me in it a subject as well entitled to deliberation, mald tell his words and lones of kindness, he will at ture deliberation, as any subject which had served as least do it in those of a mitigated severity, least, ever been

brought before that House; and yet, able indivi

penadventure, the fear of such another rebuke, had the call for the previous question, made pod whose

from en respectable a quarter, may impair the by the gentleman from Virginia, been sustained disrespect

freedom of debate in my humble person. by the House, that momentous subject would thie previ:

Mr. DRAYTON having requested the favor have been disposed of, almost without an argu-
of an explanation, as to some points in the rement.
marks of the gentleman from Virginia, (Mr.
Doponez,) that gentleman re-stated the ob.

Mr. D. then entered into a detail as to the de. Servations alluded to, and Mr. D. then proceed bate on the preceding day, and stated the varivil in reply. The lionorable gentleman from ous opinions expressed by different members Virgin, as well as the honorable gentleman up to the time, when the call for the previous from Lussachusetts, on the preceding day, question was made by the member from Virgi(ur. Erazerr.) had both conceived there was aid feel it as a species of treason, a violation of

Mr. D. ther, proceeded to state, that he something in the observations he had offered to the House on thiut diy, unbecoming of him, the spirit, an attack on the genius and furdaC. Dutros.) and uncleserved by those to mental principles of the Constitution, to make whom it was applieil. He would assure those

such a motion at a time when a subject of such worthy gentlemen, and the House, that it was

weight had been but superficially discussedwith him a governing principle, when joining

when in fact the subject bad rather been openin the debates which took place on that floor, diments of but a few individuals on that floor

ed than entered into--when the views and sennever intentionally to express a sentiment10, not to water a single word-which could

had been expressed upon it. Surely, (said but the feelings, wound tie pride, or injure Me, D..) if there ever was a subject--if there Me character of nuy individual within these even

was a stage of any subject--at which the from the consciousness of a peculiar "sensitirse been made-- it was the subject then before the ness on these puinis within his own breast; and House, and the time, to which he had referred. as die did not conceive that any of his fellow He considered that call as a sort of comment on members had a right to take liberties

with is the very point before the House--namely, the

freedom of debate. Was it commendable, then, hand, that he had no right to make free with was it riglat, when about to prepare for the de. Mont II, then, incantivusly it was certain fence of tie citadel of that right, thus to assail done that which it was his constant en tu vor said, he thought

the difference of opinion to eld-be could only assure those gentle which was subsequently found to exist amongst offensive interpretation that it was not this which took place justified his assertion, that justification, suite the grounds in which he had the call for the previous question was made. the the worls which had given offence to Mr. D. concluded by re-assuring the

honorable the very respectable gentlemen from Virginia He had intended no offence to their feelings, Hon universally considered throughout the nor any aspersion of their characters; if they here that the question brought of thought the expression

he had used

was harsy

, privilebat it was a question involving first one pained him to think it had done s»; there were en els the rights of the citizen, le protection Kinder feelings, or a more profound respect.

Mz. DODDRIDGE said, I would remind the

und die the lone commed prehen me other

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ded, in a long and discursive argu. review the grounds for the assumplion rise of this power by the House. In e of his remarks, he expressed an opi the right of exemption from question might

be said in debate, was to pro: bers from responsibility in courts of referred to the immunity enjoyed by

who, although not subject to action ning that might be said by them on

in issue before a court, were yet of their privileges and rendered liable, r persons, for language used when

out of the record. What was the elation to this matter? In a debate on ect of certain charges against the col. the port of Wiscassel, the member 70, (Mr. STANZERT,) accused Governor

of participating in an attempt to comeudid fraud upon the Government. d that to do with the question before se! If it was not travelling out of the ne, (Mr. F.) was at a loss to know uld be considered so. He had thought ne that it was, and that the gentleman elling on dangerous ground. He artif such a power as that now contendpould be granted, members of Cone uld become irresponsible

, and that visiting this city might be outraged by ch impunity; the courts of law being gainst them, and their own hands being En by this authority to punish for con

- breach of privilege. It would lead estruction of that American feeling ught always to resent a slander or any

jury upon character and reputation. munity of members was never intended ct them from wanton insults to their citizens; and the best mode of preserva dignity of that House would be prof conduct and deportment, and purity In the part of its members. This would

best shield, and under such a course it e assuredly thrown over them by the pinion of the people of the United

bserved, that the term ruffian had been

to Gen. Houston. He had lung known entleman, and he would say that such a "as, in every respect, inapplicable to Mr. F. entered into an eulogy of the er, merits, and services of Gen. H. and d, in the course of it, to the fact of his risen from the ranks when he carped for his country and received a wound fence, which had disabled a limb. He en from this state, he said, to that of or of Tennessee; he had, himself

, te een a member of Congress, and it was be wondered at, that when he was of a splendid fraud, he should show eeling under such a degrading accusa. If there was an unction which rendered rs of that House sacred, his friend Gen. n had been, therefore, long since ed with it. He begged them to n collect ey, themselves, would some time or

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