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posite opinions he, at different periods, has en tertained of the President, I ought to conform myself. I never had any personal rençontre with the President—I never promulgated a bulletin on any such rencontre. I never com: plained of the toresident beating a brother of wnine after he was prostrated and lying apparently lifelessor he member from Missour; needs no more specific indications of the transaction to which allusion is now. motle, Nor did I ever make such a prophecy of the events. which would ensue from the elevation of the President, as the public press ascribes to the hon, Senator from Missouri, o, Mr. CLAY-concluded by observing, that he did not mean to detain the Senate by any far. ther notice of the observations of the Senator from Missouri. He had now and forever discharged all obligations under which that Sena _tor hail placed him, and he had given him a full acquittaance. o. -- Mr. BENTON said, that it was true he and General Jackson had had a personal conflict; o *** **ue he had fought with him; but he *Ped, toey had fought as men, when that contest was o so was their enmity–three --- they were good friends, and at any * *...* would have assisted and ho o on his power for the other. They o * was true, but there was no *o adjourned o vergeity between then**w- remaining on the public

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skix telegraph,

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out the author in the Senate

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heard from he gentlem in from lienttucky.

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to his sleeve—it would stick, stick, stick there; and there he wished it to remain. * Mr. CLAY rose, and said he returned the charge of calumny to the Senator, from Missourt. * The CITAIR, (Mr. Tazewell.) said the de-bate could not longer be suffered; --fron Kentucky must take his soot. Mr. G1.A.Y. I wish to explain.

the sedator -
ist, h committee on the part of the Senate.

A message was received from the House cominunicating that a committee has been appain ed on the part of the House to join such committer as might be appointed by the Senate to wait on the President, oad inform him that the two Houses were now ready to adjourn.

Messrs. Tylen and Kiss were appointed

On motion of Mr. Pol NDExten, the Senate

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t ve business, in order to enable him to submit

• Mr. GLAY-1 tell the President i nost o motion in executive session.

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tor from Missouri out of order?

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At a quarter before eight the doors were re

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Mr. Tylen, from the committee appointed to wait on the President, reported that they performed to t du y, and had received for wer that the President had no further conmunications to make.

On twotion of Mr. B1a1, a message was sent

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The CHAIR-the present incumbent was not to the louse of Representatives to inform the

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words were not distinctly audible in the gallery; but we understood him to say, that he had not • conceived the debate irregular at the period he Mr. Potspex I BIt having sat down, there was a general call of “question,” “question.” The CHAIR then put the question, “shall - this bill pass?” It was decided in the negative * -ayes 22, noes 19; a majority of two-thirds beins required to pass the bill; by the following vote : o - o - ~ - YEAS–Messrs. Buckner, Chambers, Clay, Clayton, Dallas, Foot, Frelinghuysen, Hen‘drick Ho'nes, Johnston, Poindexter, Prentiss, * Robbins, Robinson, Ruggles, Seymour, Silsbee, Sprague, tipton, Tomlins n, Webster, Wil... kins—22 - - , - - **

ley, Ellis, Forsyth, Grundy, Hyne, Hill, Kane, King, Mangun, Marcy, Miller, Moore, Tazewell, Troup, Tyler, White-19. - -

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suspended.

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liouse that the Senate was ready to adjourn. A loessage was received from the House ! staong that, having closed its legislative scs.

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The Senate then adjourned to the first Mon: day in December next. - s

The Hous E OF REPRESENTATIVES, in positance of the order of Saturday, as.

solo at six o'clock. Mr. Masos, of Virginia, offered a resolution witch was adopted, calling up several-bills from the caleidar - i Mr. Stewahr, by conscut, presented certain memori ds from citizens of Pennsylvania, praying for a subscription to the stock of the Ches opos and Ohio Caval Guajpany, to be ap. plied in the cons ruction of the w-stern scetion of that work, +- --The inetmorials were laid upon the table. | Mr. Ste “Ant presented, also, a memorial on the subject of the tar, if on the motion of Mr. BAasoom, of Virginia, * resolution was unanimously passed granting 50 dollars additional compensation to each of the messogers of the House, in consequence of the unusual length of the session. On the motion of Mr. Taylon, ef N. York, an additional compensation of one hundred dol.

| lars was voted to the chaplain of the House.

Mr. T. in proposing the resolution, expressly stated that it was offered without the knowledge of the chaplain. On the motion of Mr. Polk, an extra compensation was voted to the postmaster , of the House... o On the motion of Mr. McDuffI2, the resolution for printing 10,000 copies of the Presi. dent's message, on the bank bill, was called up and adopted, the amendme-t submitted by Mr. Whittlesex, of Ohio, having been previously negatived without a division. On the motion of Mr. An Axis, 500 additional copies of the Senate's repurt, on the subject of weights and measures, were ordered to be

• *- lpriated. . . . The resolution was agreed to, and the rule

Mr. Polk offered the following resolution, which was adopted:

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- A message, similar in purport, was received

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Resolved, that a committee be appointed by this house, to be joined o such committee as may be appointed by the Semo to wait on the president of the United States, and to no tify him that, unless he may have some further ommunications to make, the two Houses of congress having completed the business before them, are ready to cose the present session by adjournment. *"o A message was shortly afterwards received from the senate announcing their concurrence in the resolution.** o Messrs. Polo and Fishtax were appointed the committee on the part of the House.o.o. After a short interval, Mr. Pook, from the joint committee, reported that the committee had discharged the duties for which they were appointed, and received from the President,

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dered, that a message be sent to the Snate to

notify that body that this House, having co

pleted the business before it, is now ready to

elose the present session by an adjournment;

and that the clerk do go with saidomessage.o.

from the Senate. the House, then, at 8 o'clock; adjourned to meet again on M

TAres weekly

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cember next.

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declared under martial lawoour news schooner Eclipse came to town this morning at nine o'clock, having boarded at sea at eight o'clock last evening the Packet ship Francois 1st, Captain Pell, from Havré, on the 10th of June, By this arrival, the editors

of the courier and Enquirer are exclusively into

possession of Paris dates of the 8th, and Havre of the 9th June. o --The intelligence will interest, as demonstrating the disturbed situa: tion of France, and the probability of another revolution. We have confined ourselves almost exclusively to the particulars of the insurrection in Paris, as we have neither time nor space to trace the movements in the departments. Of these Maine et Loire, La Vendee, Loire Inferieure, Deux-Sevres, and several others, are placed under martial law by Royal Ordonnance. It has been discovered that the Duchess de Berri and Gen. Bourbon have visitod all the southern provinces, and many of their circulars and o orders have been seized and published.-- The accounts come to us only through the ministerial papers, the liberalones having been . *PPressed or issued with blank pages, o . have no correct means of judging of the o:. but by their partial representation. great *** we learn enough to excite anxiety for the future. The disband.

be: found of exciting

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President pro tem. of the Senate, and asks us to

name the Van Buren Senators who did. We are not in the confidence of the Van Buren Senators, and therefore we do not pretend to know who voted for Mr. Poindextor; but w assert, upon the best authority, that Governor Miller voted for Mr. Tazewell, and that Mr.

... Poindexter did not vote for himself . The statement in the Globe is a wilful and deliberative calumuy.

We are told in the Globe that there never "has been a session of Congress so distinguished for political intrigue as that which has just closed; and it adds, that the “aspirants for the Presidency and its outposts, the Departments, have been unwearied in their cfforts to throw the affairs of the country into confusion, with a view to profit by the chances,” . The ‘‘aspirants to the Presidency” are, first, Gen. Jackson, next Mt. Clay, nex, Mr. virt, and last, it least, the Hon. Mortin Van Buren And, without pretending to question the accuracy of the statement, we venture to assert that the candidates suppored by the Globe have done more to throw the affairs of the country into confusion than it was possible for Mr. Clay and Mr. Wirt to do. But we note the article as explaining the policy which is to be adopted; and the reasons of the warfare which is to be waged against the members of Congress who have had the indepen fence to prefer the interests of their constituents to the will of the President. - - - - * . The Van Buren policy is to flatter and purchase those woo can be purchased, and denounce those who cannot. It is to bribe those ... who can be bribed, and silence those who cannot. The session coumenced by the appointment of a Speaker remarkable for his partisan subserviency, and this appointment was followed by a rumor that he was to be appointed minister to England, - To the effect of this rumor on the Speaker himself, and upon several other aspirants to foreign missions, in the two Houses may, in our opinion, be traced the intrigues, which have had a most unfavorable bearing upon the character and legislation of Congress. I will be our duty to speak of these hereafter. . But we refer to the article of the Globe, to say that its chief object is to discredit, with their constituents, those independent mem. bers of Congress, whom they could neither purchase nor intimidate into a blind acquiescence in all the intrigues put on foot by the kitchen cabinet, for the so. of Mr. Van Buren.—

secondary to that object; and the whole power

: of the administration is to be thrown against any

member who dared to refuse his support. Will the people approve? We will see,

- the TARIFF, . Mr. McLane's project compared with Mr. - Hayne's. In the Globe of Saturday we have a long article, accompanied by a formidable array of figures, to show that “Mr. Hayne’s proposed reduction on protected articles Fou The rinst Yeau would have been 600,000 dollars less than that which would have been effected by the bill of the Secretary of the Treasury.” A little further on the writer makes the “total reduction in the first year $300,000 more by the Secretary’soil that by Mr. Hayne's proposition.” Now, without admitting the fact to be as here stated, what would it prove if Mr. Hayne’s proposed reduction for the “first year” was less $300,000, or even $600,000, than Mr. McLane's final reduction. Mr., Hayne submitted to the Senate no detailed plan, but

been quoted in the Globe,) that provided the duties should be finally “brought down to the lowest revenue standard,” the duties on the projected articles might be brought down gradually to that point. It was intimated by Mr. H. that 15 per cent. was the true revenue stand ord, which he supposed, with charges, &c. would give to the manufacturers an amount of protection, fairly incident to revenue, equal to 333 per cent. It is true that Mr. Havne -declared that, provided these principles were

not care if the reduction on the protected articles should be made by two or three successive steps, (the public debt being spread over the same period,) while the unprotected articles, (not now admitted duty free,) should be brought down at once to 15 per cent. Mr. H. declared that if his plan were accepted, he did not care if the first year a reduction should be

made a part of the measure that in three years it should be &arried down a still further reduction, and the third year to bring down the duties on the protected articles to 15 per cent. atl valoren. Can any one suppose that such a proposition would not have been accepted by the whole south? And if suc', a plan had been adopted by Congress, the existing difficulties on the subject of the tariff, would have been finally and happily adjusted. Assuming the calculations in the Globe to be correct, the following would be a fair comparison between Mr. McLane's scheme, and Mr. Hayne's proposition,

All the great interests of the country are but showing the final reduction by each scheme.

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he intinated in his speech, (a part of which has

adopted in the adjustment of the tariff, he did .

made of only ten per-cent., provided it was

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