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have any reduction of taxes, rat, " than e ontnue the old system ; and really the king the bill a little better than the prosen rift. But there are others who could only have seen actuated by electioneering motives. Who were etermined to hove a bill of some ki d, some modification or other, to enable the poros ns of M \rtin V in Buren to cry ou compromise! the glorious compromis the Union is sovo The bill is, evidently, a most grievous disap. pointment to the va, Birenite Jacksonians.— They had, themselves, some of them a ... ast, calculated so fully the disposition and ability of the friends of Mr. Van Bure to control the tariff, that they really expected to be able to produce such a tariff' as would satisfy the south.

lative, body, so little acceptable to those by - whose votes it was carried. It is a singular fact, that the small minority who voted against 15, comprises many who owe much better pleased with the bill than abodtone half that east their - Many voted against it, who privately admit that it is a better tars than the present offe, and more voted in favor of it, who publicly and privately declare it is worse for th. States a ho complain of being injured by

the protective policy.”

The foregoing from the York Gazette *es ** true statement of the view which to c fiends of the tarist ake of the new biłł. We could confirm it by numerous letters of a similar purport what a very different opinion have he friends of the tariff formed of the new bill from that which the servile, prositoried Van Burn press. es are inculcating on the freemen of the so sh: The latter are called upon to meet their “triti brethren half way and acco ot-the “comprowis.” so generously offered Attempts are made to represent it as a “sacrifice” on the port of the torth. The base, treac ferous cry is, “ com: proofs, compromise!” let us also “sacrifice” something, and save the Union, The ext; nt of this “compromise,” this “sacrifice,” on the part of the northis fully shown in the extract a bove. So decidedly is it a fantrfacturers' bill, that we are candidly told, that many (ultra tariff) woo voted against it consider it a “better tariff than the present one.” No doubt they do; and, although they voted against the bill, they rejoiced at is passage. They voted against it from policy. It would show their devotion to toe protective system ; and it would enable the ** iudicious” tariff men to battle more success

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bled to show to the south, the hostility of those denominated the ultra-’ariff party. This policy was too palpable to be neglected ; and we see with what avidity it was pursued by the faithless, treacherous, self-styled friends of the south. The Globe and the Enquir r took the lead, and we shall soon have the whole servile pack yelp ing after them unless they are shamed into si. lence by the indignant voice of the people. what shall we say to those who “ voted in fa. vor of the bill, who declared it worse for the south, worse for their constituents, than the bul of 1828, some, we believe, voted tor it from mistaken patriotic views, thinking it better to

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How wofusly are they disappointed. The first movements of the party showed the impo -ibiliso of it. The northern memb-rs had to fly the rack, fearful of the consequences at home, and the southern members had to follow wh rever the former led, cursing the bill in secret, and vociferating loudly in its praise in public. It was a cruel dilemma, but there was no scoping from it. what could they do? To cry out reachery against their northern allies, and join their true hearted, free trade, and States right brethren, was a magnanimity to which they darea not aspire. Some have, indeed, been andid enough to own that they have been deceived,and they "have it now in their power, amply, nost

ted in turning too willing an ear to the deceiver, by coming outboldly and honestly, and joining their brothren in their resistance to their oppressors. To their honor be it spoken, some have avowe, this to be their determination.

rue vice preside.Ncy, V1 nar N1A AND Nonth Cartoli N.A.—These two patriotic States have held conventions for the selection of candidates for President and Vice P. silen, and wave uni ed in the support of Andrew Jackson for P.esident, and Philip P. B orbour for Vice President. The conventions by which this ticket has been adopted, are denounced by the trichmond Enquirer as failures; because forsooth, a large majority of the people of those States did not turn out at the elections for delegates to those conventions. - The Enquirer is well satisfied with the Baltimore convention, at which Mr. Van Buren was nominated; altuough the objections on the ground of popular sanction are in finitely greater in the case of Virginia and North Carolina. We contess that we have no particular reverence for conventions of this kind, as they are now managed in the United States. They are obviously of. ener resorted to, to put down rivalship, to an to ascertain the will of the people. With regard to the convention at Baliimore, this as obviously the case. No one doubted that Mr. Van Buren would be nominated there. The wonder is, that the greatest part of the votes given him, were from States in which he has not the least prospect of an electoral vote, and that this powerless tribunal should be thus used, to control the votes of the triends of General

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ampty, to red em the errors they have commit- "

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Jackson, in States giving him an efficient sug ort, we shall see whether this necromancy will have the intended effect; or the patriotic sons of the south, suffer themselves to be thus driven to the standard of Martin Van Buren, the champion of the abominable tariff system For ourselves, we have not the least hesitation in giving our feeble support to that talented and patriotic son of Virginia, Philip PENELETox Lanaoton. -

The preceding extract from the Federal Union, published at Milledgeville, Georgia, expresses, we have no doubt," he sentiments of a large ortion of the citizens of that State; and when they become better acquainted, (as they will be on the return home of their members in Congress,) with the views of the Van Buren party of the norto, we have little doubt but that a majority of the state will cast him, off as one who materially aided in fixing the burden upon o they feel souppressive. Bot why should they vote for Mr. van Buren when it most be apparent that it is almost impossible for him to be elected? Aste being elected by the people, that is out of the question. He will unquestionably loss New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, North and South Carolina, if he loses any of those States, he will not be elected by the people.o. But suppose him to go to the Senate. Is - there one single individual to be found who will say that he has he slightest chance of being closen by that body? No one ever pretended to be so blind as not to see that a ma. tively hostile to Mr.

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jority of the Senate are pos. Van Buren.

This is not the case with Mr. Barbour. The same majority which elected Mr. Tazewoit

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who would also get thovotes given by the
Jackson Van Buren party to Mr. Poindexter.
lf, therefore, it be the wishes of the people
of Georgia, not to have Mr Sergeant ohosen
as Vic President, and not to throw away the
vote of the State, there is but one course to
pursue-not to vote for Mr. Van Buren.
The NExt coxgloss:
The election of memberso Congress in Lon.
isiana, was held on the 2d instant. Accounts
from New Orleans say that the Hon. Edward
D white is re-elected without opposition.
Mr. Greghton, or Ohio, declines a re-elec.
tion to congress. - -

THE UNIVERSITY of ALABAMA. The “Spirit of the Age” published at Tus. saloosa, gives a gratifying account of this infant institution, and the character of the faculty is such as to promise increased pr Yeral of he professors are known hire as gentlemo, fextensive hierary attainments, p. *** Woods was formerly professor of math. : o - *} oatural philosophy in columbian i. -8- ‘..." district. Professor Bonfils conu to datage and highly respeciable female socity with distinguished

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into four classes, and we hear
the students highly soken of Two of these
classes, it is supposed, will, during the
autumn, commence the study
and italian languages.”

shall rank among the dutie
to watch, specially, over.
church, then public prayers
low as ordinary incidents

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Journal, to refer to the rep
the committee of the Gen

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raduates of the Universityof Virginia.o. --- The following extract will be gratifying to he friends ..". institution: “The University went into operation in the

spring of 1831, and is in a very prosperous
condition,
one hundred. About sixty of these, since the -
arrival of Mr. Botfils, which has not been

The number of students is about

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more than two months, have taken up, in addi,

tion to their other studies, the study of the

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boarung **ol in ti,
**enussiaProfessor Tutwiller ranke
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to the

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to bring about the war, (the Indian war except

Y.DITORIAL REMARKS, &c.

-we have heard it said, (we have not referred to dates,) that the important victory under Commodore Perry, which turned the tide of war in our favor, occurred the next day after that which had been set apart by him for a similar purpose. . - - . But it is charged that Mr. Clay was hypocritical; that he introduced this resolution into the Senato, because he had ascerained that Gen. Jack-on had refused to appoint a day. to of e no Mr. Clay’s apologists, nor are we in his can. ficience. His friends, however, deny that he knew Gen. Jackson's opinions upon this subject ; and no one could trave anticipated that Gen Jackson could have entertained constitutional scruples upon such a subject. If Mr. Clay had ascertained his opinions, many of his most intimate portisans had not—and it is assuming too much to assert, against his denial, that he had. A reference to dates will show that the resolution was introduced before Mr. Clay could have obtained any knowledge of

General Jackson's opinions through the press :

what private channels he may have, we know -not. - . But gross and improper as the remarks of the Advertiser are, those of the Huntsville Demo clat are nuch more so. That print, of the 5th instant, contains the following extraordinary ar. ticle: Faort two Ruxtsville nextoca ar. “ War, pestilence, and famine, when Mr Clay, at a former period, invoked “war, pesti. lence, and famine” upon his country, it was lit. tle expected that he would ever have the pleosure of winessing the practical effects of any of thes", his favorite scourges. But, to judge from the accounts lately received, there remains scarcely a doubt, that the table orator will be gratified to find his withes, at least in part, ful. filled; and that his pestilence, which is uow raging on our bord rs, in the shape of the cholera, - will soon make is appearance in our large cities, and, perhaps, ex en to very part of the

* county. Mr. Clay's object in o the

PEstilence first, is, no doubt, the result of mature deliberation and conviction of its importance, as a preparutory measure, if his w An and FAmost should immediately follow . It is cer, inly an improvo ment upon uno modern system of military tactics, to sweep off thousauds peaceably at their hoto s, where they can be decently buvied by their friends, instead of accomplishing * the whole work in the field, where the fatiguo ... of killing so many by t.e sword would be almost unsupportable. We hope, however, that with all his it genuiy, M. Clay will not be able

ed.,) which he so ardently desires between the • south, r , and northern people; and that he la:ter will be procrastinated to some “more propitious” time. It is forther stated in the papers, that Mr. Clay onto plates a tour through Vir. ginia so soon as googress shall adjourn, and that he will take Hanover, (wis native county,) and old Goochland to his route. Now, we have gro at solicitude for the welfare of the old dominion, and particularly these two counties;

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the latter being the land of our birth, and the former the abode of many dear friends; and we pray that Mr. Clay may disengage hums. If from his pestilence, before he crosses the line, for there would be no getting rid of it, should it seize updr, his native slashes.’”

We could scarcely credit our own senses— we did not suppose that in this enlighted age, and in this Christian country, there could be fund an individual so wanting in respect for public opinion, to say nothing of the higher obligations of religion and morality, as to be guilty of such profanity; to sport thus with the powers or the Almighty!!!

This writer attributes to Mr. Cloy the power of him who rules the storm and directs the whirlwind; of him whose anger is a consuming fire, and from whose vengeance there is no escape, V. rily, there is cause for humiliation, for fasting and prayer, when such language is acceptable to our rulers. . Much has been said about Mr. Clay's war, pestidence, and famine speech. The remarks were exceedingly improper, but that is no apology for misrepresen ong them. They were used by Mr. Clay as a figure of speech, intended to show his objections to the elevation of Gen. Jackson. He did not implore the Almighty to send us war, pestilence, and famine, but as an alternative preference, in his opinion, to the moral and political consequences which would follow the election of Gen. Jackson. He was at invoking either war, pestilence, or famine, bu protesting againt the election of General Jackson. It has pleased the Almighty to inflict us with ALL, and surely Mr. Clay ought to be among the first to humble himself in prayer for a mitigation of these combined visitations; for his opposition to one is no reason why he sho old dotre all.

We find in the Globe the following list of nominations and appointments: Appon roleNTs by THE PRESIDENT, By und with the advice and consent of the Senate. Aarot, Wall, late Secretary of the Legation of the United States at London, to be Charge d'Affaires at London. . George W. Campbell, of Tennessee, one of the Commissioners for carrying into effect the late Convention between the United States and France. . . . . John K. Kane, of Pennsylvania, sane, Thomas H. Willians, Mississippi, same. * John E. Eros, of the District of Columbia, Secretary to use Board. John H. Whe ier, of North Carolina, Clerk. William McRee, of Mississippi, Commissioner on the part of the United States for running the bounda y line between the United Stales and the United. Mexican States. It bert Love, of Nortly Uarolina, Surveyor. . Samuel O. Bayard, of Ohio, Clerk. Gordon Forbes to be Surveyor and Inspector of the Ilevenue for the port of Yeocomico in the State of Virginia, vice John S. Tapscott, deceased.

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John w Langdon, to be consul of the U. states a Laguira, Isle del Carmen, in Mexico: David G. Burnet, of New Jersey, to be gonsul of the U.States at Galvezton in MexicoFrederick List, of Pennsylvania, to be Consul of the U. States for the Duchy of Baden: Robert Roedoffer, of Munich, in Bavaria, to be Consul of the U. o at that place. To Powhattan Ellis, to be judge of the United States, for the District of Mississippi, vice Pete Randolph, deceased.” John H. Sommerville to be register of the land office, for the district of lands subject to sale at Montgomery, in the state of Alabama Nimrod E. Benson, to be receiver of public money for the district of lands subject to sale at Montgomery, in the State of Albomas Jack Sbackelford to be register of the land office, tor the district of lands subject to sale at Mont, vallo, in the State of Alabso Joab Lawler to be receiver of o for he district of lands subject to sale at Montevallo, in the State of Alabama. -- o * why has the Globe omitted to give the appointment of Leois F. Linn and soilkins op

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provide for the final adjustment of land claims in Missouri’ we have some roarks upo these nominations in reserve, and have waited to see what would be said of them by the Globe. We now ask of the organ to say who are these commissioners? o claims had they for such an appointment? and upon whose recommendation were they appointed 2

The organ may rest assured that, if it canań.

swer satisfactorily, it will be to the interest of

the Administration to answer quickly.

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pers of yesterday, the o meeting held in the state House yard, Philadelphia, upon the subject of the President’s veto mes.

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which assails the bank, and denounces the pro

ceedings with as much viroience as its file leader, the Globe, could do the Uni. States Gazette estimates th

thousand o o MEETING of THE PEOPLE: At a numerous meeting of toe citizen

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** , ungrateful, as it is

Pennsylvania and of the Union, heartily and - manfully to contend at the approachin: election for the maintenance of tho-e principles, and the promotion of those rights, which the - patrio's of our revolution sealed with their blood. Charles J. Jack offered the following resolu -- tions accompanied by some remarks suited to the occasian. The resolutions were unanimously adopted: - Resolved, That in the veto of President 3ackson, he has shown an utter contempt of the unanimous voice of Pennsylv nia, express... ed through her Legislature, and delegation in Congress, both with regard to the bank, the tariff, and the judiciary. - - . * Resolved, that the hostility of General Jackson to Pénnsylvania is as extraordinary as it is to be doubted that to her active, persevering and permanent support, is he mainly indebted the presidency

3.

... lution, which was unanimously adopted. Resolved, that the thanks of this meeting are que, and are hereby tendered, to the Hon. George M. Dallas and William Wilkins, Sena.

for his elevation to

Many of the opponents of the admoors or who are in favor of the Bank of the uno States, were r conciled to the veto, unter a hope, that added to the other causes of disaffection, this would defeat the re-election of General Jackson. “We are not, surprised that songuine partisans shoul make such calculations. There are several States in which the change of a few votes would reverse the result; and that there is sufficient cause for change, if there had been another candidate acceptable to - the people, is apparent. But the politicians have not, we are induced to believe, placed a proper estimate upon the fact that those who have the independence to separate from the Jacks on party are generally deep|ly committed gainst Mr. Clay—they have not taken into the account the organization of the party press, and tie influence which it exercises over the public mind. For ourselves, we confess that some of the last scenes of the late

- - • session of Congress, connected with the causes Daniel W. Coxe offered the following reso. \gress,

which we know to have operated upon the individuals who controlled the action of the two Houses, have convinced us, against our will, that the love of office and the hope on “re ward,” has hio a most dangerous influence

tors from Pennsylvania, for having, after a full over the legislation of that body. We are not sli-cussipn and deliberation being had on the surprised that these rival factions have created Exocutive veto to the bill for rechartering the la general belief that the contest is a mere bank, cowtinued to vote for the passage of said struggle for office, and that therefore the counbill; and that the Secretaries are instructed to try will not be benefitted by a change. - communicate the same to those gentlenen. ol, this the time for the patriot to despond?

Josiah, itantiall offered the following resolu-'Shall thes; fold their arms in quiet at quies

tion, which was adopted by acclamation.

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ice-ce, and permit our institutions to decay for want of energy to maintain them? We will not desp tir—we will confide in the virtue and intelligence of the people; and having placed jour trust in these we will discharge our duty; opposing those acts which tent to preju ice and thus to undermine our wise institutions We will fearl, ssly and faithfully labor to enlighten the public mind, by censuring that which deserves censure, and recording those

facts which form part of the public history, .

and, as such, should be known to the people. The western papers bring us the following circular trom the Commissioner of the General Land office : “San : to send you the 2d number of the

“foct: ; Globe.” It is only oac dollar for thirIts numbers. As it is of the one wrest wron|Tasco in the approaching contest for the Pre: sidency, that this to per should be circulated and real in every neighborhood in Oolo, can you procure five or ten subscribers to it in your v. culty if you can and dy, you may transmit the sauney to me, and I will see the papers forwarded 6 such persons, and to such post offi| , as you shall direct. The back mu wbers wiłł be sent.” . - . . . . coxwest.—General Jackson, in his inauguirst al tress, said : - *

o rocent demonstration of public sentiment inscrib, s, on the list of executivo duties, 1... cn racters too les' ole to be overlooked, the task of reform ; which will require, particular* * - - -

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