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brought the patronage of the Federal Govern-stice to close its concerns. The also

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- - --- 516 UNITED states weekly TELEGRAPH,

ly, the correction of those abuses that have the United states had less ustonewoo.
men into conflict with the freedom of elec-spired on the 1st of March, 1811 on the Is
tions, and the counteraction of those causes of June, 1842, the bank paid 70 percento
which have disturbed the rightful course of ap-jits capital stock, and on the 1st of Octobers:
pointm no, and h veolaced, or continued pow-ceeding, an additional instalment of ego
er on, unfaithful or incompetent hands”- per-cento ---

: The great objection urged against the re-joon the other side, the Franklin Rolo

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son, has put his veto upon the bilo to recharter wom. Nixon
the Bank of the United-States. We present Jos, M. Johnson

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that gentleman explicity stated that, althoug

he occupied the Chair wien the debate com menc d, it had not, at the time he relinquished it to the President, partaken of so excepti hable a character as to rendor it necessary to arrest it. Mr. Tazewell, seeing the poin' to which the debate was tending, resumed the Chair with a view to arrest it, should it become proper to do so; but it is due to Mr. Poindexter to say, that this would have been done as promptly by him, as it was afterwards done by Mr.Tazewell. * It is but fair to say, that the Intelligencer copi... ed his report from another paper, and that the * editors not having been present, do not vouch o for its accuracy or - . .

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ion to the quantum of vituperation bestowed

upon the Senate, will be the pleasure they will

give to the Pre-ident and to those who either ido control him, or at least are supposed by the wily sycophants and slanderers to bave that power . . . . . . * - * * Some persons may stippose that we are doin injustice to the Executive m supposing that the course pursued by his editorial partisans meets with his appr. bation. They will naturally |-uppose that the first officer of the Government twood never descend to encourage, by his an– |probation, that disgraceful vitup ration of a co ordinate branch of the Government, which i. distinguished the administration presses for some months past. . . . . But are we unjust? Have we not every reason to suppose that this abuse of the Senate is agreeable to the Executive, and that it is a part of a fixed determination and o destroy its independence, and render that body a mere register of the will and wishes of the Executive.

nian, of July 21, and is signed by any citizens. In no other manner can we account for he

of Philadelphia: * *

.* bestowed by the Psesident himself, on

- ... - y - - ... A meeting of the Democratic Citizens of the that body, and its reiteration by the hundred City and County of Philadelphia, who will sup- organs of the views and wishes of the kitchen

* port the President of the People is the firm

cabinet.**Nor can we otherwise account for

... and viruous exercise of his constitutional pow: the course pursued by the Executive in relation ers, and who are friendly to the re-election of to the appointment of a Register of the land

ANDREw J Ackson, BANK OR NO BANK, will be held on Monday next, the 23d instant, at 5 o'clock-in the afternoon, Independence Square, State House Yard. . . . . . . i’ENNSYLVANIANS! The President of your choic, is again assailed by your defeated enemies, under old pretens s, and new disguises. - - AMERICANS! The citizen who has sealed your freedom with his best blood in: two wars, is charged with reason to your institutions: - PEOPLE OF THE UNIO & ! Your advocate -is attacked for his Roman firmness in during to restore the purity and virtue which are the only safeguards of the Republic: You are to weigh the accusers in the balance,

" and to pronounce the judginent of the incor

luptible people.

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- are now n-king, by the partisans of he Execu

tive, to subvert the independence of the Senate, • have become so manifest, that none can even pretend to doubt the fact. An attempt of such * a nature, by a large portion of the periodical press, is calculated to excite uneasin-ss in the mind of every friend to our politieal mstitutions; but when we see that these attempts are coun. tenanced and encouraged by the President limself, our tears are toubled, rhat this is the case at present, is very apparent. The pertinacity with which the Globe and the other setvils presses persist in their “buse of those In mbers of the Senate who dare to differ from the Presiden, in any of those matters upon, which we may have set his heart, is conchu v. evidence of its receiving his sancti or, and to , 'no doubt, teel well convinced, that in proporo

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'office for Mount Sulus, Mississippi. These are !all parts of one whole. All tending to force the Senate •" yield submission, willingly 9 or unwillingly, to the wishes of the Executive. Acting upon some by a dread of personal abuse, upon others, by a fear of the public service suffering, and their fellow citizers being put to great inconveniences, unless they yield those rights and powers granted then by the coastitution, to gratify the whims and caprices of the Executive. - - - The circumstances connected with the appointment of the Register of the land office at Mount Salus, in Mississippi, which led us to the preceding remarks, are th; following: The Senate, in the session of 1830–1, had passed a resolution “that it was inexpedient to appoint a citizen of any one State to an office in another State, in which such citizen does not reside, without some evident necessity for such appointment.” The propriety of some such principle, expressed or implied, being adopted by the Senate and Executive, is so apparent, that the resolution was adopted by the following vote. . . . ... “ - -Thos: in italics were filendly to the adminisration. . - “. . . . . . Those who voted in the affirmative, are; Messrs. Barton, Bell, Benton, Burnet, Chase, Clayton, Foot, Hendrick, Kong, Marks, Noble, Pointierter, Robons, truggles, Sanford, Seymour, Silsbee, Smith, of M rytand, Tozewell, Troup, willey, Woodbury, 22. • ‘Those who voted on the no gative, are, ofessrs. Barnard. Blob, Dorkerson, Dudley, Ellis, Kane, Koght, McKinley, sinth, of S. ... olina, Whitc.—10. . . . . . | 1st the face, however, of this declared opiinion of the Senate, the Executive goalinated,

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at : he next session, Samuel Gwin, as the Re

gister of the above named land office. Mr. Gwin ministration, (we should rather solo

was a clerk in the post office department, and had been, a short time previous to the moting

of Congress, appointed by the President to fill

the office to which he was then nominated. On
the nomination coming before the senate, Mr.
Gwin was rejected by the foowing vote;
Those who voted in the affirmative, are,
Messrs. Bibb, Brown, Dallas, Dickerson,
Dudley, Grundy, Hill, Kane, Knight, Mangún),
Marcy, White, Wilkins.—13,
Those who voted in the negative, are,
Messrs. Bell, Benton, Buckner, Clay, Ewing,
Foot, Hanna, Hoyne, Hendricks: Holmes:
Johnston King, Miller, Moore, Poindexter,
Robbins, Robinson, Ruggles, Seymour. Silsbee,
Tomlinson, Troup, Tyler. Webster-34
Sometime afterwards, June 10th, probably
under the impression that the Senate had been
pretty well drilled into submission by the abuse
which had been so lavishly bestowed o
them, Mr. Gwin was re-nominated. The re-
nomination being taken into consideration, it.
was laid on the table by the following vote: o
Those who yoted in the affirmative, are,
Messrs. Bell, Benton, Bibb, Chambers, Clay.
ionowing, Foot, Frolinghuysen, Hendricks,
Holmes, Johnson. Knight, Mungush, Moore,
Naudan, Poindertor, Robbins, Ruggles, soyo
mour, Silsbee, Smith, Sprague, #o.
ton, fomlinson, Tyler-27 o'
Those who voted in the negatoe, are,
Messrs. Brown, Buckner, Clay, ballas, Dick:
erson, Dudley, Ellis, Forsyth, Grundy, Hill.
Kane, o Miller, Robinson, White,
Wilkins.-17-o-o-o-o:
this course was adopted at the instance of
a friend of the President, with an under-
standing that he should be advised to with:
draw the nomination, and nomistate some other
individual. It was subsequently stated in the
Senate, that the President had declared that
he never would nominate to the office “a citi.
zen of Mississippi * *o o
Thus the . remains vacant, and o
lic revenue, and the interests of the citizens of
Mississippi, are to suffer through the blind ob.

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stimacy of the President, unless he is determinio

ed to usurp the power of re-appointing Mr.

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thus diminish the respectability of that aking of the tariff law he says --- --

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to - What has disturbed he tranqui - country but a belief in the south that the riff in defence of States Rights, during the present ... . as it was, was unjust, unequal, and oppressive?|session of Congress, entitles him to the respect * ... " The setter b fore us admits that the bill is an and gratitude of his constituents. attempt to tranquilize the discontented. How - - [9 cheers—1 gun. - for it us been successful may be seen in the By Thomas S. Mays, Esq. orator of the day: spirit which is man fosted in the following. The Whigs of 1776, the Republical s of 1798, - and the State Irights Party of 1832. Actuated

to asts :

... by the same pure devotion to the principles of

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tute powers of the ouvernment may be, out in

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of a o Against that of the tyrant, the

tem. Got by cupidity out of self interest, as to

620 UNITED states weekly telegraph.

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the legislation of Congress, we cannot compro- fier, go by intellect out of pon sty. ories mise a constitutional principle without putting one on the later, -

at hazard all our rights.”

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By Dr Stephen S. Garrett, south Carolina They have made their last appeal to the jus:

and Georgia; Sprung from a common ancestry,

and patriotism of the present Congress, and

they will make common cause in defence of the not granted we will show them in the blood

rights of the south. -
By Mr. Thos. Brenan, South Carolina Nul

lification : A monument of terror to the north

ern aristocracy. With a Hamilton, a Hayne, and a Miller as its guide, it will soon teach such tyrants that the cotton planters of the south must

"o" be respected. o
By"Bolling Hall, sen: Esq. The Constitution
of the United States: A rule of action, prescrib-
ed by the States, or the people, for the govern-
ment of their agents: To protect the weaka-
gainst the strong, and the right of the minority
against the usurpations of the majority. We
will not permit this sacred instrument to be ntil-
lified by our servants.o
[John W. Womack, Esq., previous to offer
ing a sentiment, favored the company with

pertinent and excellent speech. He concluded by proposing the following toast: Our Constitution, Liberty, Free Trade and State Rights, forever, or o By Mr. T. Robinson, jun-The oppression knife of a Brutus or the axe of Cromwell may avail, but what can withstand the tyranny of a heartless majority but an appeal to the original rights of man against such op ression. [Mr. Wm. Nichols, jun, said that the exercises of the day had suggested to him the propriety of the following sentiment jo South Carolina; Ask her for her jewels, and like the mother of the Grachii, she will point you to her gallant and gifted sons. . . . By Merrel Ashurst. The orator of the Day, Mr. Scott, Mr. Womack, Mr. Robinson and Mr. Brumby: They have plainly told us our rights. will we defend them or not. - Bvowm. B. Read. Nullification rather than submission. Free trade or no trade. Yeomen of the south, stand to your rights.o By Dr. A. G. Goodwyn. The Rights of Freemen : Among them is the right to fight in resisting oppression. --.*.*. Alexander. Dixon H. Los firm and undeviating supporter of State Rights. Alabama is not yet prepared to dispense with his services. - By B. M. Carter. I hope that the sons of true republicans have not forgotton the cause: that their fathers fought and bled for; and if they have not, let them consider the tax on tea and the tariff.

By A. Mortin. “The Union. It must bel.

preserved”--upon the principles of justice and
equality, * ...o. ----
By John T. Ashurst. May the spirit which
animated the hearts of our ancestors in 76 sus.
tain her sons in 32, and the same glorious result
most follow. -
By 1st am woodward. The American sys-

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be matched against the celebrated horse Nulli

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